Misty Valley Yirgacheffe - Page 2

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
jasongcasale

#11: Post by jasongcasale »

Misty Valley is one of the best coffees I have had I love it in espresso..

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wingnutsglory
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#12: Post by wingnutsglory »

I might be missing it but I can't tell on their site that it's not stock they're selling from last year's offering. I've been waiting (im)patiently for this year's Ethiopia arrivals to start trickling down to home roasting greens suppliers...

Trjelenc

#13: Post by Trjelenc replying to wingnutsglory »

I noticed that Sweet Maria's has got quite a few Ethiopians, I ordered some Ethiopia Dry Process Yirga Cheffe Mengesha Farm to see if it has the blueberry they're advertising.

Case17

#14: Post by Case17 »

addertooth wrote:Yes, one of the resellers is coffee bean corral. Roasted right, the blueberry flavor is unquestionable.
How tricky is this one to roast? It seems that the CBC Misty Valley is pretty reliable for blueberry?

I had been considering getting the recent Sweet Maria's Ethiopian (https://www.sweetmarias.com/ethiopia-dr ... -7368.html) which also lists some blueberry notes. But, I've always about about Misty Valley and maybe now is the time to try it instead....

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wingnutsglory
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#15: Post by wingnutsglory »

Trjelenc wrote:I noticed that Sweet Maria's has got quite a few Ethiopians, I ordered some Ethiopia Dry Process Yirga Cheffe Mengesha Farm to see if it has the blueberry they're advertising.
Oh, that one looks appealing! Maybe it should go to the Greens Alert thread.
I'm a little apprehensive since I find SM tasting notes a little optimistic sometimes. This one sounds pretty promising though!

addertooth

#16: Post by addertooth »

Coffee bean corral has another good "blueberry performer from Ethiopia".
It is the Ethiopia Durato Bombe Sidamo bean.
I roasted it last weekend. In my opinion it is an even better blueberry flavor than the Misty Valley type (although the Misty Valley is pretty outstanding in blueberry flavor).

The main difference I saw as the Durato seemed to be a more complete/well-rounded blueberry flavor AND it needed about a 5 day rest period for the flavor to develop. The Misty Valley developed blueberry flavors during the rest much quicker.

I have roasted both, and their roasting curves are very similar.

addertooth

#17: Post by addertooth »

Case17 asked:

How tricky is this one to roast? It seems that the CBC Misty Valley is pretty reliable for blueberry?


It is a dense high-altitude Ethiopian bean. This makes it one of the easiest to roast. Like most dense beans, it requires a harder/faster roast to build up to first crack... but it can take it. And, a faster roast tends to preserve the fruit flavors much better than slower and more gentle roasts.

And yes, both it and the Durato Bombe listed above are easy to pull off. I would offer you my roasting method, but it is tuned for a Gene Cafe roaster, which relates rather poorly with other roasters.

Milligan

#18: Post by Milligan »

addertooth wrote:Coffee bean corral has another good "blueberry performer from Ethiopia".
It is the Ethiopia Durato Bombe Sidamo bean.
I roasted it last weekend. In my opinion it is an even better blueberry flavor than the Misty Valley type (although the Misty Valley is pretty outstanding in blueberry flavor).

The main difference I saw as the Durato seemed to be a more complete/well-rounded blueberry flavor AND it needed about a 5 day rest period for the flavor to develop. The Misty Valley developed much quicker.

I have roasted both, and their roasting curves are very similar.
I had their Shantawene Sidamo G1 from last years harvest alongside the Misty. I preferred the Sidamo for reasons other than blueberry. It pulled a better and more flavorful espresso for my palette. Both were nice.

I agree about roasting these beans. Very very easy. Drop them around rolling first crack for fruit or just after first crack end for some chocolate undertones. They taste flat in my opinion if you go too far into medium (as with most Ethiopians.) I believe I did a low/average charge temp and aggressive heat through drying and most of maillard. Taper in to first crack as with any other light roast.

kkoltunf

#19: Post by kkoltunf »

I just bought some Misty Valley and I have a Gene Cafe roaster. I would love to hear how you roast these beans on the Gene Cafe.

addertooth

#20: Post by addertooth »

kkoltunf,

Let me break out my copious roasting notes....
Like all roasts, each one should be an improvement upon the former roasts. You do the math, look at moisture loss, and development time. You compare any loss of the "lighter notes" such as floral and fruity, and tune development to gain the best flavor the beans can produce.

For starters, if you are using the Gene Cafe there are three temperatures to remember for this bean. The first 402 degrees F (which is used for pre-heat and dehydration cycle). Next is 473 degrees F (which is started at the tail-end of the dehydration phase, and extends to First Crack plus 60 seconds). The final temperature step is 437 F (which is what you drop the temperature down to about 60 seconds after first crack BEGINS).

Roasting notes:
Pre-heat the EMPTY drum at 402 F for five minutes. Do a rapid stop, quickly pull and fill the drum with 1/2 pound (8 oz, or 227 grams) of green Misty Valley beans. Quickly re-insert the drum, zero your kitchen timer, and start the Gene Cafe at 402 F (The stop, fill, clear, start cycle should only take you about 30-45 seconds max, to retain the heat in the Gene).

Let it dehydrate for 5 minutes with the beans in at 402 F. Raise the temperature to 473 degrees F at the 5 minute mark on the kitchen timer.
Some observations: Beans hit full yellow at about 6 minutes, some roasts as late as 6 minutes and 15 seconds. At 10 minutes and 30 seconds you will note First Crack has begun... start thinking about that temperature change you will have to do in a minute.

At 11 minutes and 30 seconds lower the temperature at 437 degrees F. By this time First crack should have completed. Now you will be working on the development phase. Continue roasting at 437 F until the end of the roast.

The Roast is pulled and EXTERNALLY force cooled with flowing air at the 13 minute mark. This gives a 19.2 percent development (roughly). I use a shop-vac to pull air through a colander which is holding the beans. The beans are stirred while they are cooling for a couple of minutes. I typically stop cooling when the beans are at about 105 degrees F.

Recipe tuning notes: The age of your heating element, and ambient temperature may require minor adjustments to this example My Gene has low miles, and I normally roast with an ambient temperature of 85-90 degrees F. If you don't feel the fruity flavor is bright enough, reduce the amount of time you are roasting at 437 F in 15 second increments. I am pretty happy with where it is at right now. It produces a clear bright blueberry flavor. Earlier attempts at different times/temperatures produced a more "muddy/fuzzy" blueberry note.

Cupping notes (or the importance of cheating): When I eat a REAL blueberry I notice some things about the flavor. It is tart, sweet, blueberry aromatics, and tannic (from the skin). The combination of all these flavors create the overall impression of "real blueberry flavor". Some roasted coffee beans are sweet, but rarely as sweet as an actual blueberry. You may note the perception of the blueberry is enhanced by adding a small amount of sweetener to the coffee. Purists, who will only drink coffee black will likely dislike this "cheat".

Best of luck to you with your Gene.

Addertooth