Learning to roast in the Neapolitan style - Page 10

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
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Almico

#91: Post by Almico »

drgary wrote:Thanks for showing that profile, Alan. In my roaster it doesn't run away like that. Also I wasn't the only one on this thread who found that the coffee needed rest to overcome the initial bitterness and integrate into a very mellow shot. I've liked it best starting about 10 days post-roast but already it was quite improved 2-3 days out. If I can get it all the way to 2C with steadily declining RoR I'll post about it here. It would be a different green, though.
The "runaway" factor depends on just how fast you want to get to the desired drop temp. If the goal was to try and roast the outer seed faster than the inner, then getting there quicker is the way to go. Taking more time would allow for more heat transfer to the inside.

I brewed a pot this morning. As expected, less sweet- 0.8 Brix and a bit roasty. The upside is it seems to retain some of the nuttiness and toffee of my normal dark roast, but at a price. I have that gritty sandpaper feeling on the roof of my mouth that just won't rinse out no matter how much water I drink.

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drgary (original poster)
Team HB

#92: Post by drgary (original poster) »

That might be what I call "spice," which some like, others don't. I'll be interested to learn how it tastes after it's rested.
Gary
LMWDP#308

What I WOULD do for a good cup of coffee!

sareea

#93: Post by sareea »

Alan,
What are the curves ?
Green is inlet temp ?

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Almico

#94: Post by Almico »

sareea wrote:Green is inlet temp ?
Yes

sareea

#95: Post by sareea » replying to Almico »

I see inlet temp past 10:00 is cooler than bean temp.
whats driving the roast past 10:00? Isn't that problematic for a roast?

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EddyQ

#96: Post by EddyQ » replying to sareea »

It means the hot drum is doing too much heating and cooler air is is needed to shape profile.
LMWDP #671

sareea

#97: Post by sareea » replying to EddyQ »

I understand, I am sure air cooler than beans are not passing the beans otherwise...

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Almico

#98: Post by Almico »

It absolutely means that the air passing through the bean mass is cooler than the beans. Cooler incoming air is required to slow the roast. I will sometimes pull the trier to let more cooler air into the drum. Whatever it takes to keep the RoR from rising; something it is trying to do in a big way at that stage of a roast.

sareea

#99: Post by sareea » replying to Almico »

That is new to me
Good to learn
Thanks

Rickpatbrown

#100: Post by Rickpatbrown »

Almico wrote:It absolutely means that the air passing through the bean mass is cooler than the beans. Cooler incoming air is required to slow the roast. I will sometimes pull the trier to let more cooler air into the drum. Whatever it takes to keep the RoR from rising; something it is trying to do in a big way at that stage of a roast.
Hot d%#n! What a nugget of knowledge! I was wondering why (I thought it was exhaust temp) was dropping.

So, do you measure exhaust temp?
That would be really interesting to see inlet temp go down, but exhaust go up or stay the same ... meaning excess heat is coming from the beans.

Lately, I've been using exhaust temp to get another idea of roaster energy. My Huky is a very different beast, than yours, though.