James Hoffmann: Deep Fried Coffee - Page 4

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
Pressino
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#31: Post by Pressino »

Note: video shows sand roasting for nuts, but clearly the machine could be used for coffee "nuts" and maybe by coffee nuts...

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yakster
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#32: Post by yakster »

I bet it would be really difficult to execute much of a profile with sand, it probably responds pretty sluggishly to changes in temperature. That's why sand is used in Turkish coffee and people also use sent in meat smokers replacing the water in a pan with sand to keep the temperature stable.
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Pressino
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#33: Post by Pressino replying to yakster »

We are now getting into the realm of speculation and will never really know how well sand roasting would (or would not) work until we try it.

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#34: Post by Jonk »

As far as I've heard the heat is supposed to be very uneven when using sand to brew cezve. Maybe it was a good way to control the heat centuries ago and it lives on as a tradition. Imagine walking on a beach a hot, sunny day. The very top layer of sand can be burning hot, but if the sand is soft enough for you to sink in it's nice and cool underneath.

In a spinning drum like that nut roaster I guess the sand is more evenly heated. Seems like the benefit for nuts at least is quick, pass-through roasting. I'd expect it's very difficult to get rid of every grain of sand from a bean unfortunately.

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LBIespresso
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#35: Post by LBIespresso »

Before I started roasting I thought of roasting coffee like sticking something in the oven. I have since learned that different types of heat applicaton (radiant, conductive, and convective) "cook" things differently and at different rates. I have also learned that our roasters all seem to apply heat in these different ways differently from each other as well as differently based on batch size, drum speed, airflow, etc....

Yeah, it's complicated. I believe that roasting in the future will more precisely apply heat intensity as well as heat type. Maybe silly discussions like this will spark a great idea to help move things in that direction. Even if deep frying isn't the future :lol:
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#36: Post by JamesB517 »

Frenchman wrote:Next step: air frying coffee. Oh, wait...
Ha!
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#37: Post by COFF3Edrinkinrabbit »

rmongiovi wrote:One direction I've been curious about but haven't seen much development in is radiant heat. Rather than heating a drum and/or air and then letting convection/conduction do the work, agitate the beans and shine infrared directly on them.
Actually, I (luckily) got the chance to use a roasting machine (not BocaBoca) thats designed with a similar concept in mind.

Results are OK at first, and after tweaking my previous roasting beliefs to account for the difference in heat application when roasting with mainly radiant heat energy (trust me its very different, especially after the beans gone yellow), I did manage to get some fair results.

I personally wouldn't say roasting with radiant energy gives "better" results since I believe that the green coffee used already set the ceiling quality-wise, but I do think that there is some potential. The coffees can taste extraordinary when roasted this way, and it seems that with radiant-driven roasts, one do not need to heat up the roasting air to similar temperatures when roasting on traditional drum roasters. This drastically reduced the energy spent while roasting (since heating up air and maintaining its temperature is...not the most energy efficient thing to do thermodynamically speaking).
rmongiovi wrote: Likewise coffee roasting with microwaves. Why not? Because microwaving doesn't generally encourage the Maillard reaction and that's integral to developing coffee's flavor. To brown things in the microwave you generally use a special dish that gets hot itself and provides the heat needed for the Maillard reaction. So microwaves are producing the energy but not directly doing the browning. That makes my expectation of microwave coffee roasting be, "probably won't be as good as regular roasting."
Didn't get the chance to touch the machine, but have tried two microwave roasted samples (taiwan sure is a place with some absurd coffee roasting technology). Good, developed, fruit and floral forward cups, but for my taste it sure can benefit from a bit more browning. I think this can potentially become a style (especially paired with the boom and craze of all these new processing methods).

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TomC
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#38: Post by TomC »

yakster wrote:I bet it would be really difficult to execute much of a profile with sand, it probably responds pretty sluggishly to changes in temperature. That's why sand is used in Turkish coffee and people also use sent in meat smokers replacing the water in a pan with sand to keep the temperature stable.
My Weber Smoky Mountain smoker has been filled with a heat-soak mass of simple beach sand from Home Depot since day one for gentle heat radiation and cooking. No complaints with regard to that cooker over a decade now....
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