Ikawa Home Roaster 100g (2021 ver.) - Review - Page 8

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
rhtrevino
Supporter ♡

#71: Post by rhtrevino »

mgrayson wrote: Guatamala Blue Ayarza Espresso- Great day 1, Great day 3.
Just roasted up a batch of the Guat for filter. It looks great, so can't wait to try it.

Auctor (original poster)
Supporter ❤

#72: Post by Auctor (original poster) »

mgrayson wrote:Well, a lot of energy has to transfer to the beans, and it's only coming from the air, so there has to be a temperature drop.
I hear you. Once the beans hit similar Temps as the original airflow, that should steady, right? I wonder if its safe to assume a 100 degree delta from initial temp to exhaust airflow.

Separately (more broadly to the community), is there any value in creating a separate thread that matches various Green beans with Ikawa Roast profiles? Id like to believe that given how many of us now own the Ikawa Home, there may be value in sharing bean recipes. Thoughts?

CafelatStore: home of Cafelat products online
Sponsored by CafelatStore
mgrayson
Supporter ♡

#73: Post by mgrayson »

Zambia Isanya Kateshi, Filter Medium +, Day 3, prepared as espresso. First impression - earth. After a few seconds, spice, then a pulse of bitterness, settling into a long aftertaste of dark coffee. All of these still tastable after adding steamed milk. Quite comforting, which is a marked contrast to just post-roast, when it seemed undrinkable.

Greens from outside the Ikawa world due today, so things will get - well, probably frustrating.

Matt

mgrayson
Supporter ♡

#74: Post by mgrayson »

I've spent this afternoon roasting greens from non-Ikawa sources. I'm trying their generic profiles - have to start somewhere. But now I have a problem - what to do with honey processed greens. Ikawa provides profiles for Natural and Washed, but not Honey. Any advice on how to approach it? For example: use profile X, but dump the beans after 2 minutes of development? Or is it simply "it's the same as washed for most of your generic roasting purposes." Or "you're doomed. Go back to Klatch."

Any advice welcome,

Matt

baldheadracing
Supporter ♡

#75: Post by baldheadracing »

My advice to anyone starting roasting is to:

1. buy 10lb or 20lb of a washed Guatamalan or similar washed hard-bean high-grown Central American coffee. Washed Guats are friendly to roast, can handle a variety of roast levels and brewing methods, and are typically inexpensive enough that you won't mind if a batch goes to the compost. Roasting the same coffee over and over is the fastest and easiest way to learn your roaster;

2. consider getting a FoodSaver or equivalent and vac and freeze your green coffee into smaller portions. That way you won't have to learn how to adjust your roasts as the green coffee ages. FoodSaver (brand) rolls are pretty good; I use mylar rolls https://vacuumsealersunlimited.com/prod ... r-cabelas/

Everyone - everyone - starting out wants to roast a variety of coffees, but I would say to stick to their coffees with supplied profiles if you go that route. The subscription seems a pretty decent deal.

mgrayson
Supporter ♡

#76: Post by mgrayson » replying to baldheadracing »

Good advice, certainly. But has anyone EVER followed good advice to beginners? It usually takes years of work to appreciate the importance of good advice. How many people start making espresso by getting consistent and then varying one parameter at a time to understand its effect? How many piano students practice slowly? Ok, so I *did* ask for advice, and here I am complaining. Apologies!

I'll dump my exotica in the freezer and do as you suggest. I quite like Guatemalan, so it won't be a hardship. And the Ikawa subscription looks to be the only coffee they sell that doesn't have hideously expensive shipping. Edit: No, shipping is free if you order enough....

Auctor (original poster)
Supporter ❤

#77: Post by Auctor (original poster) »

Not sure if this is me falling into the trap, but I just purchased 6 different varieties from Ikawa (not the sampler) and got free shipping. Due to arrive Monday (4 day ship time, 20% off).

Baratza: skilled in the art of grinding
Sponsored by Baratza
baldheadracing
Supporter ♡

#78: Post by baldheadracing »

mgrayson wrote:Good advice, certainly. But has anyone EVER followed good advice to beginners? ....
I'm just repeating the advice that I got from a roaster when I was starting out. At the time I probably had a dozen different greens. He sold me 20 lbs of Guatemalan. I must admit that I have never bought Guatemalan since ... but that was before I knew about freezing green coffee. The "thing" to do back then was store greens in cloth bags so the greens could breathe. I only drank Guat for months ... :o

MNate
Supporter ♡

#79: Post by MNate »

You know... with a traditional roaster I might agree with the buy one type and learn the ins and outs of your roaster and how to roast. But with an automatic I wonder if it's not better to roast a wide variety and see what the roaster does best with its set profiles. Idk. But if you can't vary the profile much, how many iterations can you try with 20 pounds?

I almost bought one today...

mgrayson
Supporter ♡

#80: Post by mgrayson » replying to MNate »

I thought about this a lot before buying. Even without the advanced editor, the generic coffee provides 30 different profiles - 15 each for espresso and filter. But there's also each Ikawa-provided coffee's curves and *their* 30 variations. And finally, you can choose a long development time and then go into the cooling cycle at any time prior to the curve's end. I was thinking, probably naively, that with, for example, a non-Ikawa Ethiopian, I might start with Ikawa's Ethiopian curves.

And one can do both. There are always the Ikawa coffees. And it's good that they provide a target. If I teach myself roasting without good examples from the same machine, I might just fix upon a mediocre result and think that that's as good as it gets. This happened the last time I tried roasting a decade ago.

You're right that it isn't a standard roaster, but that doesn't mean there isn't a lot to learn about its behavior. (And I only got 10 pounds of Guatemalan. And my family adds milk and sweetener - they'll be happy with it forever. And so far, of the Ikawa coffees, I like the Guatemalan best. So this isn't really a hardship.)