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Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
Cwilli62
Posts: 208
Joined: 5 years ago

#271: Post by Cwilli62 »

mgrayson wrote:I was never thrilled with any of the out-of-the-box Ikawa coffee/profile combinations. It gets better when you can make your own, but it's more work. My tastes (espresso only) start at about their darkest not-over-developed roast and go darker from there.
I have tinkered with recipes a little bit. There's a lot to learn, though!
brunomarinho wrote:In case it helps I've been experimenting with this profile:
https://share.ikawa.support/profile_hom ... AlENkBQgA=

It is based on this post https://www.tumblr.com/no-stream/178085 ... intro-this

I've been playing with how many seconds after first crack and using mainly one coffee (ethiopia) and have got some very decent lighter roasts. One thing that I notice is that depending on the beans it is really hard to notice first crack and things tend to over develop and as pointed before, small air roasters can be aggressive so 5s or 10s can make a big difference after first crack.
I'll give that post a read and also take your profile for a spin.

viteaux
Posts: 37
Joined: 8 months ago

#272: Post by viteaux »

Hey Bruno, thanks for posting this. Just so I'm clear, the post you linked seemed to me to indicate that the poster let the roaster "charge" for 30 seconds before dropping the beans. Did I read that correctly and is that how you are doing it? I've been struggling with Ethiopians myself. Getting close with help here, but not as dialed in as as other coffees.

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drgary
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#273: Post by drgary »

Cwilli62 wrote:African coffees are my go to. But I do like variety and try to switch it up. It's also hard for me to get many pounds of any particular coffee because I'm worried about getting bored with them. However, I understand that the downside of that is that it's harder to dial in a roast with only one or two pounds of coffee.
Two lbs. should be plenty, since the IKAWA roasts such small quantities. If one of those coffees tastes close to what you want, you could order more right away and freeze the greens, vacuum packed to keep them fresh.
Gary
LMWDP#308

What I WOULD do for a good cup of coffee!

brunomarinho
Posts: 9
Joined: 5 years ago

#274: Post by brunomarinho »

viteaux wrote:Hey Bruno, thanks for posting this. Just so I'm clear, the post you linked seemed to me to indicate that the poster let the roaster "charge" for 30 seconds before dropping the beans. Did I read that correctly and is that how you are doing it? I've been struggling with Ethiopians myself. Getting close with help here, but not as dialed in as as other coffees.
Hey! Yes, I've been adding the beans at around the 30-second mark. I've been finding it challenging with some Ethiopian beans as it's difficult to discern the first crack, but I've managed some flavorful roasts. Perhaps we should do an A/B test, dropping after 30 seconds versus at the start of the timer, to see if there's a noticeable difference. I suspect it might lead to an earlier first crack.

For Ethiopian beans, aiming for an 11% weight loss seems to hit the sweet spot for my taste. Interestingly, one roast resulted in only a 10.2% loss, which I'd normally consider under-roasted. It was a bit grassier than I prefer, but it brought out a unique strawberry cake note that I haven't been able to achieve with roasts over 11%.

GDM528
Posts: 830
Joined: 2 years ago

#275: Post by GDM528 »

brunomarinho wrote: It was a bit grassier than I prefer, ...
While experimenting with stepped profiles, I developed an association of grassiness with the browning phase of the roast: IKAWA Home - profiles

Many IKAWA profiles tend to be really short, especially for lighter roasts. That gets me concerned the greens aren't spending enough time to cook out the grassiness. My current solution is to start RoR profiles with an initial 170-190C step, which gets the roast into the browning phase sooner and extends its percentage of the overall roast time. FWIW I've seen IKAWA offer similar step-hold-step profiles for their curated greens (AA Karuthi, Kenya).

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drgary
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#276: Post by drgary »

Coming from a 1 Kg drum roaster, I find the dial in opportunities ample with a small charge weight and a consistent roaster, especially if you charge with 65 gm. While I'm waiting for Kapton tape to add more thermometry to my IKAWA, I'm pairing greens that interest me with IKAWA's posted profiles for similar coffees.

Here's a specific roast paired to a coffee that worked wonderfully with IKAWA's posted recipe so you can try it with a green that's currently available.

I downloaded IKAWA's Al Qafr, Yemen recipe and their recommended Filter Light-Medium + and Espresso Medium + versions. The coffee I used was Yemen Mocca Mattari from Coffee Bean Corral. it may be the same as this coffee at Sweet Maria's for a much better price.

The Al Qafr, Yemen Espresso Medium + nailed it very close to the flavors described on both sites. It was multi-dimensionally sweet and fruity with apricot leather along with cantaloupe and honeyed tea. There was a bitter top note that may disappear with more rest. It was at its best as it approached room temperature. I had this six days post-roast. It should be even better now. Weight loss was 13%.

The Filter Light-Medium + roast had a mild Meyer lemon flavor with some rustic bitters and not much else. Maybe it needs more time to open up. We'll see. I have 2 lbs of that coffee, so there's plenty to enjoy from here.
Gary
LMWDP#308

What I WOULD do for a good cup of coffee!

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drgary
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#277: Post by drgary »

Here's another profile matched with a coffee that's still available. It's at Prime Green Coffee, Colombia La Cristalina Pink Bourbon Natural. I used the IKAWA Home recipe for Kemgin Geisha Filter Lt Med ++, 65 gm, 13.6% moisture loss. I'm sampling it 4 days post roast after letting the grounds rest for 15 min. It is floral and balanced with a slight bitter note at top, but that bitter note might settle out as it rests. I haven't fine-tuned the roast using the Edit function, but this is a good place to start. I brewed it in a Clever Dripper at 202°F / 94 C and steeped it for 4 minutes at coarse grind with an HG-1 hand grinder. Those of you with a large, flat burr grinder are likely to get more definition of flavors.
Gary
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What I WOULD do for a good cup of coffee!

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drgary
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#278: Post by drgary »

Here's another approach to that coffee. When I crunched on a bean it was a complete fruit bomb. This is a profile I adapted from our member Phil, aka crunchybean, from his posts in a thread where I was experimenting with roasting Ethiopian naturals. The charge weight was 65 gm.

Tips for roasting an Ethiopian natural



Here's my sketched in version with more data points than his:
131C 1:38
157 2:22
183 3:31
215 5:31
237 7:41
249 10:00
Fan 75 through 10 min, then 79 through 11:16

I followed his suggestion in the same thread to drop the roast the moment you smell fruit and don't wait. So, I used my senses along with his go-to profile. At 4:15, the hay smell disappeared, so the coffee was through the drying phase. At 5:00, Maillard (browning) could be seen through the top of the roaster. At 6:30 the roast smelled bready. At 8:00 it smelled intensely fruity and I hit the Cool button. This achieved a 10.7% moisture loss.

I tried the same profile with a Yemen. Almost all Yemens are naturals that are very dense and high-grown. My next pass at the Yemen would drive more heat into the bean early on because the milestones were compressed and the taste out of the roaster wasn't nearly as amazing. The hay smell disappeared at 5:10. 6:20 was bready/malty. 7:20 was fruity and sweet and I dropped it. Was it a successful roast? Too soon to tell because Yemens are said to need lots of rest.
Gary
LMWDP#308

What I WOULD do for a good cup of coffee!

GDM528
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#279: Post by GDM528 »

drgary wrote:... that coffee.
To clarify, you mean the Pink Bourbon natural in post #276?

If, hypothetically, someone wanted to try this profile with greens they already have on-hand, what sort of general attributes should they consider? Varietal, processing, altitude, climate?

mgrayson
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#280: Post by mgrayson »

drgary wrote:Here's another profile matched with a coffee that's still available. It's at Prime Green Coffee, Colombia La Cristalina Pink Bourbon Natural. I used the IKAWA Home recipe for Kemgin Geisha Filter Lt Med ++, 65 gm, 13.6% moisture loss. I'm sampling it 4 days post roast after letting the grounds rest for 15 min. It is floral and balanced with a slight bitter note at top, but that bitter note might settle out as it rests. I haven't fine-tuned the roast using the Edit function, but this is a good place to start. I brewed it in a Clever Dripper at 202°F / 94 C and steeped it for 4 minutes at coarse grind with an HG-1 hand grinder. Those of you with a large, flat burr grinder are likely to get more definition of flavors.
I roasted the same with an Ikawa inlet profile that I edited from Royal Coffee's "Crown Inlet SR1.4 +DG v5" (The original can be found here https://royalcoffee.com/product/3427097000011498037/ under the Ikawa tab. I have no idea if this profile was appropriate. It's used there for a triple washed, but it's one of Royal's goto profiles.

In the first few weeks, the dried fruit was overwhelming - many naturals, especially anaerobic, remind me of dark beer. Now that it's had 4 weeks to rest, the fruit and floral notes are still there, and I can drink it as espresso.