How to Split a Daterra Masterpiece - Page 2

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
User avatar
bradm
Supporter ♡

#11: Post by bradm »

I'm in for 5#. You pick which one, I'll learn.

To the moderators: collaborative roasting where everyone has the same bean is IMHO a huge attraction and value to this forum. Even better when we can collaborate to access large lots of high quality coffee that aren't otherwise available to individuals. Please permit and encourage this.

User avatar
GC7
Supporter ♡

#12: Post by GC7 »

I really like the two Daterra coffees that I've tried and especially the Sweet Blue. However, they have been pretty simple crowd pleasing offerings rather than knock your socks off complex flavor filled drinks. I will buy more because they are great values, pleasing alone and as blending components.

The very best Brazil coffee I've ever had and one of my all time favorites was the Sitio Baixadao offered by Roastmasters a few years ago. It was as close to a beautiful red burgundy wine as I've ever had. This to me was at the time the potential of coffee from Brazil. Now we seem to have all these exotic processing methods and a couple of novel genetic varietals of beans to choose from.

https://www.roastmasters.com/brazil_coe.html

I guess my question is if a low grown Brazilian coffee can meet the expectation of these offerings and especially at the price points they are asking. This isn't a criticism but I really don't seem tempted at those prices unless the exotic varietals and processing make that much of a difference. Interestingly, I have the Panama Elida Natural and the Natural ASD. I prefer the "regular" Natural.

Flair Espresso: handcrafted espresso. cafe-quality shots, anytime, anywhere
Sponsored by Flair Espresso
User avatar
Boldjava (original poster)

#13: Post by Boldjava (original poster) »

GC7 wrote:I guess my question is if a low grown Brazilian coffee can meet the expectation of these offerings and especially at the price points they are asking. This isn't a criticism but I really don't seem tempted at those prices unless the exotic varietals and processing make that much of a difference. ...
One knows only if the coffee passes the lip.

I always view these in comparison to wine. 5 lbs of the $16 coffee will end up running $0.61/cup (figuring $20 with transportation and I use 33 cups in a pound, not 48). A pound of coffee lasts me a little less that a week in our home.

My wife is the wine drinker in our home. I buy $15/bottle wine which lasts about 4-5 evenings.

Why do this or buy into it? Just fun once, to walk with the prize. Then, I will know after the coffee passes the lips.
-----
LMWDP #339

User avatar
GC7
Supporter ♡

#14: Post by GC7 »

Boldjava wrote:One knows only if the coffee passes the lip.

I always view these in comparison to wine. 5 lbs of the $16 coffee will end up running $0.61/cup

Why do this or buy into it? Just fun once, to walk with the prize. Then, I will know after the coffee passes the lips.
Dave- I do buy your argument. You have made it before. I spend modest amounts on expensive but not crazy expensive coffees. I never pass up the AA and AA+ Yemens and others. I guess I was asking about the potential of the low grown Brazil coffees for the complexities that make a coffee great. I could drink the CJ Pink Bourbon at 1/3 the price of these every day for its intense sweetness and complex flavors. Ditto the Keramo Neguse for its balance and intense strawberry. Lots of great coffees around these days. Can these live up to the "Masterpiece" hype. I know you have to be in the game to find out but I thought it worth the discussion.

User avatar
Boldjava (original poster)

#15: Post by Boldjava (original poster) »

Dave- I do buy your argument. You have made it before.
Sorry for the redundancy friend (winks).
-----
LMWDP #339

User avatar
GC7
Supporter ♡

#16: Post by GC7 » replying to Boldjava »

Substitute wisdom for redundancy. I always appreciate your point of view Dave.

User avatar
Chert
Supporter ♡

#17: Post by Chert »

The auction lots are larger I think than 53 lb and it would be interesting to compare historical auction prices to these offerings. The farm has a top reputation and a high sustainability rating with sought after coffees in the lower tiers as has already been stated.

For a hobbyist roaster and coffee enthusiast it is a rare opportunity. Too bad I missed the window on samples.
| |_
| LMWDP #198 |

Cerini Coffee & Gifts: official US importer for Olympia Express
Sponsored by Cerini Coffee & Gifts
User avatar
Boldjava (original poster)

#18: Post by Boldjava (original poster) »

Chert wrote:The auction lots are larger I think than 53 lb ...
Just for clarification for all. Not an auction. Prices are as stated and yes, lots are larger than one box of 53 lbs of each coffee, though Daterra doesn't specify how many boxes. Timeliness will be important.
-----
LMWDP #339

User avatar
Chert
Supporter ♡

#19: Post by Chert »

Right. My point was that one could compare this to the usual auction arrangement for cost and feasibility.
| |_
| LMWDP #198 |

User avatar
CarefreeBuzzBuzz

#20: Post by CarefreeBuzzBuzz »

One bean at a time.

Sorry Flint, I just couldn't resist. Cortado made me do it.
CarefreeBuzzBuzz
___
Artisan Quick Start Guide
http://bit.ly/ArtisanQuickStart