How to roast anaerobic coffees?

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
BarryR

#1: Post by BarryR »

I've purchased a few recently and haven't been overwhelmed. I'm a fan of natural process coffees and complex flavors so these are probably up my alley. I assume I'm doing something wrong.

I try to roast them pretty light but the weight loss always winds up close to 15% (which is much more than my typical City+ roasts which are around 13%. Maybe anaerobics have more moisture to lose?

Anyway, I assume MET should be on the low side and I should be somewhat gentle in roasting.

Any other advice?

PS: I'm mostly roasting for brewed coffee, not espresso and I have a Hottop modified for PC control.

Rickpatbrown

#2: Post by Rickpatbrown »

I cant say that there is a trend specific to anerobic processed greens. I've had some that behave just fine and others that are super wacky.

I'm not super knowledgeable about processing, but aim think that the techniques, timing and additives can vary greatly. I'd expect there to be big variations in how they roast.

I tend to like them roasted lighter (so yes, gentler)This preserves the unique flavors imparted by the fermentation. These tend to be sweet, fruity, winey, desert focused (cinnamon), etc. These types of flavors don't go well with dark roasty flavors, in my opinion.

Underwhelmed isnt the word I'd use to describe the anaerobics I've had. They are usually intense and/or weird. This is a very risky processing and can really ruin some otherwise wonderful coffee.

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Marcelnl
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#3: Post by Marcelnl »

I've had a couple of anaerobic coffees lately and they are in my top 5, both were roasted by a reputable roaster as I have no access to greens like that...
Both (first one was 120hr fermented and was funkier...as in heavier on the wet sock flavors, the second batch 48hrs, more emphasis on the winey flavors) were roasted close to what I'd call a medium level, similar in color when I drop my beans at around 208'C...FWIW of course....
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bicktrav
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#4: Post by bicktrav »

The first thing to note is that not all anaerobics are the same; there are anaerobic washed coffees, anaerobic honeys, and anaerobic naturals (expect variation within the categories). The most common these days seem to be anaerobic naturals. They tend toward heavy fruited tones and boozy ferment. Speaking broadly, anaerobic naturals fly through development; heavy heat in the latter moments of the roast destroys them. The reverse is true of the initial half of the roast; they need ample heat or they suffer from profound RoR sags during Maillard. Here are a couple examples of anaerobic natural profiles. The first is from El Vergel in Tolima, Colombia; the second is a Wush Wush from Ethiopia. Both curves yielded stellar cups. For reference, on a washed coffee, I typically run gas at around 3.5 inches WC (corresponds pretty neatly with 35%) heading into development. In both of these, I'm well beneath that. I also kept development short: about 13% for each. Higher DTRs don't yield the same uppercut notes. Of course, this is just my take. Others may have totally different approaches.


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Chert

#5: Post by Chert »

bicktrav wrote: I typically run gas at around 3.5 inches WC (corresponds pretty neatly with 35%) heading into development. In both of these, I'm well beneath that.
Thanks for the profiles. You have a Huky and SF-6 and I assume these curves are from the SF-6.

Do you still use the Huky? If you were using the huky would you also shoot for 4.5 min 4.25 min and 1.25 intervals?

I find it interesting to see how the larger roaster drives differently. If I were to hold my max heat setting through dry end, on the huky, I would really have to drop the gas to extend the ramp in the fashion you do on the SF-6, still with relatively high gas. I see you haven't cut the pressure of the gas to half until almost 7 minutes into a 10.5 minute roast.
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Rickpatbrown

#6: Post by Rickpatbrown »

bicktrav wrote:... the second is a Wush Wush from Ethiopia. Both curves yielded stellar cups. For reference, on a washed coffee, I typically run gas at around 3.5 inches WC (corresponds pretty neatly with 35%) heading into development. In both of these, I'm well beneath that. I also kept development short: about 13% for each. Higher DTRs don't yield the same uppercut notes. Of course, this is just my take. Others may have totally different approaches.
Not sure if we should discuss this here, or the Wush thread but...

I was actually referring to the Wush as being "wacky". You're profile looks anything but wacky. It looks great. In particular, I notice that 1stC is at a normal temp (or at least same as your Colombia anearobic.

More specific to this thread ... this particular natural anearobic had a particularly late crack for me and a lot of others. This is one of the reasons I say the processing is rather extreme and can produce wildly different roasting requirements, depending on the parameters if the ferment.

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yakster
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#7: Post by yakster »

Has anyone looked at the moisture level or water activity of these "wacky" anaerobic process coffees?
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olutheros

#8: Post by olutheros »

Rickpatbrown wrote:More specific to this thread ... this particular natural anearobic had a particularly late crack for me and a lot of others. This is one of the reasons I say the processing is rather extreme and can produce wildly different roasting requirements, depending on the parameters if the ferment.
I've had this happen with a couple other anaerobic naturals as well, but couldn't say whether it's actually a trend or just my mind making correlations out of nothing.

I am curious about roasting approach for late-crackers like that -- I think the most successful for me (in a limited number of tries) has been to just to kinda ignore the sound and drop at a temperature/development time that I want, regardless of how much it's cracking.

bicktrav
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#9: Post by bicktrav »

Chert wrote:Thanks for the profiles. You have a Huky and SF-6 and I assume these curves are from the SF-6.

Do you still use the Huky? If you were using the huky would you also shoot for 4.5 min 4.25 min and 1.25 intervals?

I find it interesting to see how the larger roaster drives differently. If I were to hold my max heat setting through dry end, on the huky, I would really have to drop the gas to extend the ramp in the fashion you do on the SF-6, still with relatively high gas. I see you haven't cut the pressure of the gas to half until almost 7 minutes into a 10.5 minute roast.
Yep, these curves are on the SF. I still use the Huky, although not nearly as often. You're absolutely right that the machines behave very differently, and I agree with you: the differences are pretty interesting. On the Huky, I'd need to start cutting gas earlier and more dramatically to achieve the same curve. That said, the theory described above still applies. I roast anaerobic naturals on the Huky using higher initial heat and lower finishing heat than is typical for the machine.

Rickpatbrown

#10: Post by Rickpatbrown »

olutheros wrote: I am curious about roasting approach for late-crackers like that -- I think the most successful for me (in a limited number of tries) has been to just to kinda ignore the sound and drop at a temperature/development time that I want, regardless of how much it's cracking.
I only have one roast on this bean, but it came out too dark using my standard, time past 1stC, to determine development.

Next roast, I will try just going from my normal 395°F. This is where 99% of my beans crack.