Home roasting - what's the big deal? - Page 3

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
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niad

#21: Post by niad »

I am drinking the best coffee in months this week. It is homeroasted with one third of each, Monsooned Malabar, Kamerun Robusta and Brasilian Santos. I am a total roast newbie but i read some articles and guides and now on my second try i got it right, thats for sure. Wow, what shall come from this in the future, i never thought it would be this good. Started drinking from the roast after the fifth day and it is simply among the best coffee i have had. It is easy, fast and well worth the work to roast at home.

niklas
sweden
Niklas Adolfsson

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Worldman (original poster)

#22: Post by Worldman (original poster) »

Nik,

Tell me, please (I am even "newer" than a newbie) do you roast all three (3) beans together - OR - do you roast them seperately and blend them after roast.

Do most of you guys who roast, roast the blends together, i.e. all the beans in the roast are blended BEFORE roasting. How do you deal with different roasting profiles? Or, are they the same?

Len

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niad

#23: Post by niad »

I have up until now just roasted them together. I have read that the Monsoon Malabar shall taste better if you roast some of it a bit lighter though. I will roast today again and then i will try to roast at least some of them separately to get out the flavours even more. I will come back and tell if it made any difference. It would also be fun to just put the oven to 225 degrees celsius (sweden) and wait for the first and second pop and be done. Just to compare. The last time now i roasted first on 225 degrees til the first pop and then lowered to 195 and waited for some oil on the beans and then took it up again to 225 and when i heard the pops again i took them out, it took about 25 minutes in all.
Niklas Adolfsson

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Compass Coffee
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#24: Post by Compass Coffee »

Worldman wrote:Nik,

Tell me, please (I am even "newer" than a newbie) do you roast all three (3) beans together - OR - do you roast them seperately and blend them after roast.

Do most of you guys who roast, roast the blends together, i.e. all the beans in the roast are blended BEFORE roasting. How do you deal with different roasting profiles? Or, are they the same?

Len
Here are some blending articles & threads that may be of interest...
http://www.sweetmarias.com/blending.html
An Aficionado's Guide to Espresso Blending
http://www.roastmagazine.com/backissues ... rules.html
Mike McGinness, Head Bean (Owner/Roast Master)
http://www.CompassCoffeeRoasting.com

pauljolly65

#25: Post by pauljolly65 »

Worldman wrote:I just don't see the need to roast my own when freshly roasted beans are available to me at will (as long as I drive to the roastery or a couple of coffee bars to get them). One supposes that most of you also have decent local roasters. Why then do you home roast? What is the advantage?
World, if you don't like to do things yourself, then don't bother. (I don't mean that to sound snappish; there are many things which I too pay others to do for me which I could do myself, so I'm right there with you to a certain extent.) Great locally roasted coffee, if good enough to suit one's tastes & curiosity, will add it's small dimension to a happy life. Personally, I love trying to do things myself...which is why I started roasting back in '01 or '02. Now I can't even look back. The variety of beans available to me as a homeroaster keeps my mind active and my taste buds interested!

I would suppose that you could also say, 'Why pull your own shots if the local espresso bar has a dialed-in three group La Marzocco which can produce better espresso than your home machine will ever do?' Why do it? Because I want to learn about it myself and see how good I can get. And save some $...a LOT of $, given my three-doubles-a-day habit. But it sure ain't for everybody....

Cheers,
Paul

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Worldman (original poster)

#26: Post by Worldman (original poster) »

pauljolly65 wrote:World, if you don't like to do things yourself, then don't bother. (I don't mean that to sound snappish; there are many things which I too pay others to do for me which I could do myself, so I'm right there with you to a certain extent.) Great locally roasted coffee, if good enough to suit one's tastes & curiosity, will add it's small dimension to a happy life. Personally, I love trying to do things myself...which is why I started roasting back in '01 or '02. Now I can't even look back. The variety of beans available to me as a homeroaster keeps my mind active and my taste buds interested!

I would suppose that you could also say, 'Why pull your own shots if the local espresso bar has a dialed-in three group La Marzocco which can produce better espresso than your home machine will ever do?' Why do it? Because I want to learn about it myself and see how good I can get. And save some $...a LOT of $, given my three-doubles-a-day habit. But it sure ain't for everybody....
hmmmm...Do I like to do things for myself? hmmm...

Perhaps not. I am not sure. I DO like to make my own espresso/cappuccino, etc. - but that is mostly because it is better here at home than anywhere else except the occasional visit to certain coffee bars when certain barista are on duty and pulling good shots that night. In other words, it is too much of a crap shoot going to coffee bars and I drink too much coffee to go so often. (It is only 08:20 here now and I have already had 3 shots!)

It occurs to me that I would (might?) have too much anxiety if I were roasting my own because I would then worry about the beans and their provenance, the roast profile/times, cooling time/method, blending ratio, etc. All of this is juxtaposed against finding a local roaster whose product suits my taste (which I have already done almost 20 years back).

Another of my (too many) per peeves is roast coffee inconsistency. Whether it is Intelly's Black Cat (which can range from GREAT to pretty mediocre) or La Prima's FTO (which has been off 2 times in my usage of it) to their Miscella Bar (which also goes from GREAT to mediocre) to Counter Culture's Espresso (which can range from pretty good to pretty uninteresting) the roast coffee bean consistency is not spot on - ALL THE TIME.

I wonder if I would be able to maintain adequate consistency if I were roasting my own little ¼ pound batch? My suspicion is: NOT.

Len

pauljolly65

#27: Post by pauljolly65 »

Worldman wrote:It occurs to me that I would (might?) have too much anxiety if I were roasting my own because I would then worry about the beans and their provenance, the roast profile/times, cooling time/method, blending ratio, etc.
I know what you mean. I've had several batches which went bad (mostly earlier in my roasting days) and sometimes I would rage about it....then I realized that, for me, part of the Zen of coffee roasting is being able to let go of the bad and continue the pursuit of the perfect. Many homeroasters pay astonishingly close attention to every aspect of the roast in an attempt to turn each variable into a control. More power to them, but really it's all about how the coffee tastes...and I think they get it right far more often than not. Other roasters throw a few handfuls of beans into the drum and start roasting, directing the attention of their eyes, ears, and noses to the beans rather than the clock, the Variac, and the thermometer. More power to them, too, but again it's all about the cup.
Another of my (too many) pet peeves is roast coffee inconsistency. Whether it is Intelly's Black Cat (which can range form GREAT to pretty mediocre) or La Prima's FTO (which has been off 2 times in my usage of it) to their Miscella Bar (which also goes from GREAT to mediocre) to Counter Culture's Espresso (which can range from pretty good to pretty uninteresting) the roast coffee bean consistency is not spot on - ALL THE TIME.
For true, 'Man, for true. I like the variation that I get with homeroasting much, much more than the variation I get when I shell out $15 for a pound which someone else has had the fun of cooking up. I've got a few blends which I think I really know how to roast, and which are consistently good. But I spend far more of my roast time dabbling in various SOs, seeking each coffee's sweet spot. It doesn't always work: right now, I'm finishing up a pound of Yemen Sana'ani which I roasted too light, and I notice the sour taste in each cup. However, I've got the Colombian Cauca La Esperanza at home, and I know it's spot-on.

Good thread, World. It's got us all thinking, I hope!

Cheers,
Paul

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Compass Coffee
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#28: Post by Compass Coffee »

Worldman wrote:It occurs to me that I would (might?) have too much anxiety if I were roasting my own because I would then worry about the beans and their provenance,
That's easily handled by buying ones greens from a very picky cupper like Tom of Sweet Maria's.
the roast profile/times, cooling time/method, blending ratio, etc. All of this is juxtaposed against finding a local roaster whose product suits my taste (which I have already done almost 20 years back).
When I started home roasting six years ago I could not and was not having consistent good luck ordering via Internet. But times have changed yet there's no going back!
Another of my (too many) per peeves is roast coffee inconsistency. Whether it is Intelly's Black Cat (which can range from GREAT to pretty mediocre) or La Prima's FTO (which has been off 2 times in my usage of it) to their Miscella Bar (which also goes from GREAT to mediocre) to Counter Culture's Espresso (which can range from pretty good to pretty uninteresting) the roast coffee bean consistency is not spot on - ALL THE TIME.

I wonder if I would be able to maintain adequate consistency if I were roasting my own little ¼ pound batch? My suspicion is: NOT.
Who can say whether you could or could not achieve desired consistency. I know many who can, including myself. But you gotta enjoy the process!
Mike McGinness, Head Bean (Owner/Roast Master)
http://www.CompassCoffeeRoasting.com

WhyGirl

#29: Post by WhyGirl »

RapidCoffee wrote:Why cook a meal when you can get take-out food? Why play an instrument with the world's greatest music in your CD collection? In fact, why participate in any amateur endeavor when a professional product is available for purchase?

Quite simply, I home roast for the love of it. It's part of my ongoing passion for coffee. There are endless possibilities for wonder, enjoyment and satisfaction in coffee roasting, just as in coffee brewing.
________
John

....Why cook a meal when you can get take-out food? ...... 1. cause it cost more. 2. home cook taste better. 3. take out just cant compare with home cook!.

....Why play an instrument with the world's greatest music in your CD collection... cause listen to your self play music are different than listen to a CD ....also the enjoyment of it!

But yeah I get your point.

Randii

#30: Post by Randii »

WhyGirl wrote:....Why cook a meal when you can get take-out food? ...... 1. cause it cost more. 2. home cook taste better. 3. take out just cant compare with home cook!.

....Why play an instrument with the world's greatest music in your CD collection... cause listen to your self play music are different than listen to a CD ....also the enjoyment of it!

But yeah I get your point.
1. That depends on who's doing the cooking and. . .
2. If you can't play the instrument, it's not enjoyable! :wink: :lol:

I just had this conversation this morning with one of our local roasters - who is giving a presentation this weekend on home roasting. I asked him, "why would I want to home roast?" His metaphor was, "you can buy fresh bread or you can bake your own bread". I don't roast, because there are *at least* 5 local roasters in and around the Pasadena area, where I can always get beans freshly roasted on the same day (just like the bread I buy from our local bakeries - it's almost like living in France!). It appears to be such a rare privilege to have local coffee roasters nearby, so I think it's better to support our local coffee roasters (and other local artisans), instead of trying to do for myself what they do best. I want to keep our local coffee roasters in business, so I can CHOOSE to roast - not HAVE TO roast!