DIY Metal Cyclone Chaff Collector

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Capuchin Monk
Posts: 1200
Joined: 14 years ago

#1: Post by Capuchin Monk »

After months of contemplating and planning, my diy metal cyclone chaff collector is finally done.


Parts consist of stainless steel 4" - 2" concentric reducer (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08L8PGKNY?re ... tails&th=1), 1.5" diameter stainless steel pipe with flange (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08FMT9BHN?re ... tails&th=1), 2" to 1.5" stainless steel exhaust pipe (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09J88PD39?ps ... ct_details), some stainless steel sheet (1/16" thick) and high temperature rated (550dF) JB Weld glue.





It takes many hours to do this when tools are limited. For anyone who is thinking of doing this, I would say go for it only if you have adequate metal working tools and a drill press. If not, just buy a pre-made one.
Without adequate tools, this can happen.

Jackace
Posts: 3
Joined: 3 years ago

#2: Post by Jackace »

Hey that's great! I've been wanting to do something similar. If you run the fan too fast does it start sucking some of the chaff back into the airstream? Thanks for that!

Capuchin Monk (original poster)
Posts: 1200
Joined: 14 years ago

#3: Post by Capuchin Monk (original poster) »

Air stream meaning the outlet of the blower fan? If so, then the answer is no, the cyclone action separates the chaff and drops it down to collector at the base. Faster the air speed is, harder it gets for solids to escape.

Doodads
Posts: 8
Joined: 5 years ago

#4: Post by Doodads »

Wow, great work! It looks really nice, and I like that you didn't need a garage full of sheet metal tools to build it. I've searched for an off-the-shelf stainless cone before with no luck.

Does chaff make it through to the fan or does it catch it all? I'm using a plastic cyclone at the moment, but it does allow some chaff through.

Capuchin Monk (original poster)
Posts: 1200
Joined: 14 years ago

#5: Post by Capuchin Monk (original poster) »

Doodads wrote:Wow, great work! It looks really nice, and I like that you didn't need a garage full of sheet metal tools to build it. I've searched for an off-the-shelf stainless cone before with no luck.
Thanks. I did find a stainless steel cyclone collector but it costs more than what I was willing to spend.
Does chaff make it through to the fan or does it catch it all?
I tried medium to high speed on my blower fan and it filters out all chaff that I can tell so far. Even if some escape, it won't be an issue for me since it's directed to outside anyway.

Capuchin Monk (original poster)
Posts: 1200
Joined: 14 years ago

#6: Post by Capuchin Monk (original poster) »

Update:
It turns out that 1.5" center pipe may be too restrictive for my moderate capacity blower fan. So it's been enlarged to 2" diameter and inlet pipe has been cut inside. It works better now. :)

medley
Supporter ♡
Posts: 33
Joined: 17 years ago

#7: Post by medley »

wow, this is impressive!
And that's some thick gauge SS to be working with, not an easy task without a full shop of tools.

Capuchin Monk (original poster)
Posts: 1200
Joined: 14 years ago

#8: Post by Capuchin Monk (original poster) »

medley wrote:And that's some thick gauge SS to be working with, not an easy task without a full shop of tools.
Originally, it was going to be this funnel which would've been easier to work with. If I get some free time in the future, I may make one with it.

NotThatGuyAgain111
Posts: 27
Joined: 2 years ago

#9: Post by NotThatGuyAgain111 »

How much is the temperature in cyclone?

Capuchin Monk (original poster)
Posts: 1200
Joined: 14 years ago

#10: Post by Capuchin Monk (original poster) »

I don't have a temperature probe in the cyclone but I would guess it's around 400 d F at the highest during final minute of roasting when the air temperature exiting the roaster shows around 410 - 415 d F.