Cormorant vs Chinese roaster - Page 4

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
Capuchin Monk

#31: Post by Capuchin Monk »

Brewzologist wrote:For example, many smaller drum roasters have less thermal mass than larger ones, requiring more gas changes perhaps because of this.
Also, smaller one reacts quicker to change in gas or vent. That could be an advantage. :idea:
Yes, when you move to a larger roaster you will have to learn its differences, but isn't that going to be true no matter what?
Yes, I recently moved to a larger capacity burner (same roaster) and going through the learning curve again.

dnsvd

#32: Post by dnsvd »

Brewzologist wrote:I'm going to respond a bit differently. IMO, you don't necessarily need to find a smaller roaster that acts like a bigger one. I'd suggest you just get one that is of the same type as you intend to eventually get (e.g. fluid bed, drum, gas/electric, etc). For example, many smaller drum roasters have less thermal mass than larger ones, requiring more gas changes perhaps because of this. But, there is **so** much to learn about roasting in general that you could spend a good couple years on a smaller roaster just figuring roasting out. Yes, when you move to a larger roaster you will have to learn its differences, but isn't that going to be true no matter what?
Can you really learn a lot on a behmor or gene cafe CBR 101? You can't take samples while roasting and logging using artisan seems a no go..
Not a rhetorical, but an honest question.

I am dipping my feet into home roasting and i am looking at different roasters. I would like to learn as much as possible by reading the books by Rao, roasting a lot of smaller batches and of course, tasting. I think i will learn much faster on a roaster like the huky, kaldi, quest MS3, cormorant or the bullet, all with artisan logging.

Besides the bullet, which is out of my budget, I\'m really tempted to buy a cormorant but from one point of view this seems like a bit of an ''overkill'' but from another point of view this seems like a machine that can stay with me for a very long time and grow with me.

Capuchin Monk

#33: Post by Capuchin Monk »

dnsvd wrote:Besides the bullet, which is out of my budget, I\'m really tempted to buy a cormorant but from one point of view this seems like a bit of an ''overkill'' but from another point of view this seems like a machine that can stay with me for a very long time and grow with me.
There have been some new crops of roaster on the market recently.
https://m.english.kamel.co.kr/product/c ... display/2/
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/3256804 ... 5180%21rec
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/3256803 ... 6329%21rec
I wish they came up when I was shopping for one a few years ago. :(

georgemvg (original poster)

#34: Post by georgemvg (original poster) » replying to Capuchin Monk »

The kamel cube, with its little chaff collector, I think is the cutest little roaster out there, though not very cheap.
The other two, are electrical, out of question, for me at least...

Milligan

#35: Post by Milligan »

dnsvd wrote:Can you really learn a lot on a behmor or gene cafe CBR 101? You can't take samples while roasting and logging using artisan seems a no go..
Not a rhetorical, but an honest question.

I am dipping my feet into home roasting and i am looking at different roasters. I would like to learn as much as possible by reading the books by Rao, roasting a lot of smaller batches and of course, tasting. I think i will learn much faster on a roaster like the huky, kaldi, quest MS3, cormorant or the bullet, all with artisan logging.

Besides the bullet, which is out of my budget, I\'m really tempted to buy a cormorant but from one point of view this seems like a bit of an ''overkill'' but from another point of view this seems like a machine that can stay with me for a very long time and grow with me.
Skip the low end stuff completely if you want to learn the craft of roasting without hamstringing yourself. What you propose is exactly the path you should take for your goals. I'd probably skip the electric roasters as well like the Quest and Bullet if you want to be able to 1:1 follow Raos books and use widely available gas roaster methods. Go straight to the Cormorant, Huky, Kaldi, or other gas fired roaster. Durable roasters have a strong resale market as well.

georgemvg (original poster)

#36: Post by georgemvg (original poster) » replying to Milligan »

I second that, as Bullet, not the quest, has a ton of electronics. Something can go wrong every minute you use it. And its production rating is very low...