Coffee Shrub Cuptoberfest 2013 [video]

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
pShoe

#1: Post by pShoe »

Coffee Shrub posted a video showing their discussion during Cuptoberfest 2013. Some good discussion going on between the slurping. Did anyone here attend? Any thoughts on what they were talking about?

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endlesscycles

#2: Post by endlesscycles »

I thought it was awesome discussion. Schooley is the man. Well worth the time spent.
-Marshall Hance
Asheville, NC

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yakster
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#3: Post by yakster »

Thanks for posting this, very interesting, just wish that the slurping from the cupping wasn't so close to the microphone. I take that back, it doesn't seem to matter where the microphone is, the white noise of the slurping really cuts through.

Oh, and I like Christopher's point that solely focusing on development and extending the time after first crack really flattens the roast. I've been paying more attention to allowing for development before first crack with good results, more sweetness and balance instead of just acidity.
-Chris

LMWDP # 272

pShoe (original poster)

#4: Post by pShoe (original poster) »

I am experimenting with that style of roasting more often too. I like how well it works for lighter roast, but I'm still trying to make it work for FC and FC+ roasts. When I try a short development time for FC to FC+ I have gotten divots occasionally. I haven't seen divots since my days of air roasting on a popcorn popper with no controls. I think I will make more use of stretch before 1C for brewing roasts and an occasional SOE roast and increased development time for my traditional espresso roasts.

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TomC
Team HB

#5: Post by TomC »

I see two good friends. It was a great video.
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farmroast

#6: Post by farmroast »

we've discussed this concept in the past. The idea of managing moisture in the drying depending on a desired roast level and finish/development intention. With an intended light roast coming into first carrying too much moisture being underdeveloped with a short finish. Or coming in too dry for a more med. roast ending up flattened. The trick being heat management during drying to actually accomplish this.

side note:James Hoffmann is about to post his 2nd Learn together topic "Introduction to roasting" should be interesting to follow.
LMWDP #167 "with coffee we create with wine we celebrate"

pShoe (original poster)

#7: Post by pShoe (original poster) »

farmroast wrote:Or coming in too dry for a more med. roast ending up flattened.
Thanks makes sense. I typically don't see roast degree discussed when talking about slow start / fast finish. At best a time is discussed as to when to end the roast at a specific RoR, or simply saying spend as little amount of time as needed in the development stage. As I said before, I think it is practical for lighter roasting but perhaps not for med. to dark roasts. In the end, it is all a balancing act between the different phases of the roast and manipulating the time spent in each to achieve the desired characteristics a flavors.

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TomC
Team HB

#8: Post by TomC »

I think the stretched drying phase only lends itself to the fast finish coffees that excell in such a profile, otherwise any other coffee taken to a further degree of development (time wise) will end up being flatter and baked out, or ( temp wise) taste too roasty. There's a delicate as all hell, balance.
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cimarronEric
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#9: Post by cimarronEric replying to TomC »

After reading Schooley's "Stretching Out the Roast" series, not long after I had received my roaster, I tried many combinations of stretches (think slow-fast-slow) resulting in the revelation that virtually all of the commercial roasts I've experienced were really baked. It was a wholly frustrating time in my education as everything I did tasted like plain old "coffee" rather than the fruity, interesting ***coffee*** I'd roasted previously through the luck of ignorance.

Having now tasted well-roasted coffee, I don't know why I ever liked coffee in the first place, but I'm glad I stuck with it long enough to start roasting my own.
Cimarron Coffee Roasters
www.cimarronroasters.com

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endlesscycles

#10: Post by endlesscycles replying to cimarronEric »

I went through a similar period wondering why my roasts were lacking that particular (baked) flavor every other roaster seemed to possess. Now, I recognize the baked note in every roast, period.... just to a lessor extent in those that are well done.
-Marshall Hance
Asheville, NC