Coffee roasting machine - Help needed - Page 2

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
warlock (original poster)

#11: Post by warlock (original poster) »

MNate wrote:You betcha! MN can be great! And New Zealand is definitely on our list of places to visit for many reasons. Not sure if you want to keep the beauty to yourselves though!

So far I've decided not to go bigger with a roaster so I may not be the best help. The Bullet seems to get most of the recent love on HB, with Quest and Cormorant seeing a lot of action too. Beyond that people seem to get into the sample roaster size and there it seems, like you were initially asking, people seem to stay with someone close to them due to transportation and support of the larger machine. So I'd go with Mill City Roasters, but just because they are here in Mpls.

So... my advice has run out! Jim's comments below may help a little more:

Can the Bullet R1 really roast better coffee than Quest M3s?
another_jim
Team HB
#28: Post May 13, 2019, 12:16 am

I'm not sure if they are in competition. The Quest works best with 1/4 to 1/3 pound of coffee; the Bullet with 1/2 to 1 pound. The Quest started out as a hobbyist roaster, but has found much more of a market as a sample roaster. In every design iteration, its been shifted towards that application. The Bullet seems aimed squarely at the high end hobbyist market; and it seems more an upgrade for the Hottop programmable than the Quest. Notice that Sweet Maria's sells the Bullet; and Coffee Shrub the Quest.

I've noticed people evolve in very different ways when using 1/4 pound and 1 pound roasters. I and other Quest users order many small lots of coffees, auction sample boxes, etc, and consume most of what we roast ourselves. Right now, I have about 25 different odds and ends green coffees in 1 to 5 pound lots, of which I roast about 5 or so every week, as well as some auction sample boxes I'm working my way through more slowly. People with larger roasters buy a smaller number of 10 and 20 pound bags, and end up roasting for their office and neighborhood because they produce a lot more coffee than they can consume themselves. Which one do you want to be?
Thats a interesting way to think. Yes you guessed it correct - I love coffee and I intent to small batch roast and sell as a hobby. I have access to a particular coffee via a few coffee farms in India and I am keen to test it in the NZ market at a modest price.

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JohnB.
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#12: Post by JohnB. »

warlock wrote:Hey JohnB, thats a wonderful suggestion too. But given its extremely manual and I am little to no experience. I am scared this might not be the best choice for me. Would you agree?
No. A number of owners on the Facebook Cormorant forum are first time roasters. It's not hard to pick up the basics as long as you don't try to change too many things at one time. Johan, the builder/seller, has posted a number of videos on YouTube that will help get you started. 12 years ago I bought a Hottop P as my first roaster & after a few roasts converted to it a B as I wanted to have more control over the roast. Spent a lot of time modifying the Hottop trying to get it to perform like a well designed drum roaster roaster. Wish there had been a Cormorant back then.
LMWDP 267

Lwowiak

#13: Post by Lwowiak »

As you are in NZ, and I am in Australia, may I offer you the same guidance that I have supplied to many other home roasters in Australia.
Finding a decent machine to roast 1kg is hard. Most of the branded roasters from Turkey and Europe start at $10k.
There are a couple of threads here that gave me guidance.

Basically Blue King and Wintop offer great gas and electric roasters with 1, 2 or 3kg capacity. They are well built and also imported by a couple of companies who then sell them as their own product, but at double the price. Both Blue King and wintop are reputable companies to deal with, and can be contacted via Alibaba. Wintop sell Blue King and Santoker units.

Landed into an Australian port, including freight, plus GST and import duties, these roasters cost between $4,000 to $5,000 AUD. The bullet starts at $5k. These roasters are easy to maintain and their are plenty of videos on the web. I know a few people who have gone down this path and they are very happy with their units.

Though a learning curve will be required, these roasters will yield a great result and offer many features that other roasters will not. they also have 500g models, but the 1kg unit is great value.

Capuchin Monk

#14: Post by Capuchin Monk »

Lwowiak wrote:Landed into an Australian port, including freight, plus GST and import duties, these roasters cost between $4,000 to $5,000 AUD.
:shock:

Then maybe Kaldi Fortis or Wide 400?

Lwowiak

#15: Post by Lwowiak »

1kg BK roaster is about $3k USD. Freight is LCL and varies to which port it is sent to.

Regardless of price, any of these are a much better option a bullet if you seek a true 1kg capability.

contact the sales people, they are very helpful and will assist you with all of your enquiries.

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LBIespresso
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#16: Post by LBIespresso »

To echo John here, IF you can get your hands on a Cormorant, I believe it is a great first roaster. I say this as a Cormorant owner and it is my first machine as well. I had zero roasting experience when I ordered it. I took 1 in person 4 hour class at an SCAA facility and watched endless hours of Mill City videos. I was happy with my early results and continue to be happy with my progress.

I never considered myself super handy before I purchased my first espresso machine but since then I have gained comfort in taking things apart and putting them back together. Which I did have to do with my Cormorant but with Johan's (The manufacturer) eyes on my work through Skype.

It is a simple yet elegant machine that is very nimble. It is all I know but I recommend it without reservation.
LMWDP #580

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tgappmayer
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#17: Post by tgappmayer » replying to LBIespresso »

Thanks for the recommendation. I'm curious - how long have you had your Cormorant for, and how often do you roast on it? What's the average throughput of a day of roasting?

Great looking machines - definitely very high on my shortlist as well.

Capuchin Monk

#18: Post by Capuchin Monk »

When I was shopping for a small gas fired drum roaster a few years ago, it was narrowed down to Cormorant and Kaldi. The wait time for Cormorant is the reason why I went with Kaldi.

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LBIespresso
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#19: Post by LBIespresso »

I have had it for 2 years and typically roast 3-5 batches of 1 pound each in a session. On average I roast every other week, sometimes more or less. It just depends on whether I am roasting for myself or myself and others or if I am trying to figure something out like varying airflow, diffuser or some other variation.
LMWDP #580

warlock (original poster)

#20: Post by warlock (original poster) »

JohnB. wrote:No. A number of owners on the Facebook Cormorant forum are first time roasters. It's not hard to pick up the basics as long as you don't try to change too many things at one time. Johan, the builder/seller, has posted a number of videos on YouTube that will help get you started. 12 years ago I bought a Hottop P as my first roaster & after a few roasts converted to it a B as I wanted to have more control over the roast. Spent a lot of time modifying the Hottop trying to get it to perform like a well designed drum roaster roaster. Wish there had been a Cormorant back then.
Thanks buddy, I'll keep a note of this and keep the links I find about this. I'll watch them all before I conclude about this machine. From the sounds (& looks)of it, it feels very sturdy. Good recommendation