Coffee roasting... for coffee drinkers? - Page 2

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
Bean_Thinking (original poster)
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#11: Post by Bean_Thinking (original poster) »

I didn't notice this until now! Thank you for the thoughtful reply! Between this and the Rao books I have something to work with. Thanks again, everyone.

bored117
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#12: Post by bored117 »

Something like Kimchi... has been around for few hundred years (yes it did predate that on bit diff form than what it is now). We don't really change recipe every decade to suit the latest trend. We acknowledge there will be variants of it and make recipe that seems to hit middle ground in book but in reality there will be uncountable recipe in each home. Actually, I just refuted about the "bible" like book. There is no such book for Kimchi. Or even more convoluted would be foods produced using kimchi.
It seems like coffee is hard to narrowly define as well. Many varietals, terroir, and processing (which is ever increasing) changes the taste, structure of bean to roast. Roasting itself has different target group. And consuming at brewing level has tons of different way of brewing (well, we can simplify it to probably dozen).
Collage course would probably be better off starting with life cycle of coffee, maybe cupping to find these impacts of each steps, and where does roaster fit in in this ecosystem. And from there on possibly some practical things such as charge/drying phase/malliard/FC/2C and how each variables impact flavor notes of coffee, how heat and air is used and bean reaction to it through each of this given single bean.
Now, to extend this to type of bean and process method would be well beyond 101 I think.
In that note, I've been reading Hoo's book and Rao's book to get some better grasp at things as well as other resources. Still experimenting.

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Jeff
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#13: Post by Jeff »

Though not intended as a course, I find Lucia Solis' podcast information dense and valuable. While I don't always agree with her position, her opinions are well supported.

https://www.luxia.coffee/#resources

Mbb
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#14: Post by Mbb »

If you want to actually understand roasting, you're going to have to roast coffee.

If you want to actually understand the differences between origins and types, you're going to have to drink well roasted coffees from them.

If you want to understand the differences between processing techniques, well I can summarize it for you. Do you like your coffee to taste clean , or do you fancy a bit of funky rotten fruit smell and taste.

Milligan
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#15: Post by Milligan »

Mbb wrote: If you want to understand the differences between processing techniques, well I can summarize it for you. Do you like your coffee to taste clean , or do you fancy a bit of funky rotten fruit smell and taste.
Lol, you had me until this part. Inserting a bit of personal bias here eh? :mrgreen:

Capuchin Monk
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#16: Post by Capuchin Monk »

bored117 wrote:There is no such book for Kimchi.
Well, there are "books" for some foods, Bolognese Sauce (Ragu) in Italy and Saint Martin's Croissant in Poland. Those two have official recipe published for all to see and they are very specific. I have tried the official Bolognese sauce and it's very good. 8)

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Jeff
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#17: Post by Jeff »

Amusingly, all coffee is fermented, natural, dry, washed, ... so you can't meaningfully say that you don't like fermented coffees. "Anaerobic fermentation" is something of a bizarre label since fermentation, by definition, is anaerobic.

One good reference on the marketing jargon is Christopher Feran's https://christopherferan.com/2022/08/19 ... processes/

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Martin
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#18: Post by Martin »

Heatgun/Dogbowl + wood stirring stick.

I'm not a fully-committed Luddite, but sometimes a straightforward option can be most instructive and quite possibly the best. Sure, check out the great resources suggested here, but start roasting tomorrow.
Heat + Beans = Roast. All the rest is commentary.