Another Huky chaff collector setup (cyclone)

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
STG
Posts: 164
Joined: 5 years ago

#1: Post by STG »

I drew from inspiration from DanoM's fan and cyclone: "Homemade" Small roaster cyclone

The rest is ducting from HomeDepot, a chunk of pipe and couplings from AliExpress. The goal was compact yet effective:




It is such a huge quality of life improvement and it works extremely well. It's not the largest receptacle but it is very easy to empty and it easily lasts for the roast sessions I do. That fan is very powerful. I only operate it at about 15% and that is plenty.

Hopefully this helps someone else!

Capuchin Monk
Posts: 1275
Joined: 15 years ago

#2: Post by Capuchin Monk »

Nice!

How do you empty out the chaff, just pull down the bottom collector?

jkoll42
Posts: 105
Joined: 14 years ago

#3: Post by jkoll42 »

Nice. Reminds me of many years ago when I started out roasting with a modded Poppery in my apartment I essentially had the same setup but used a ball jar for collection (small roast sizes) and didn't need a fan as to popper was the fan

STG (original poster)
Posts: 164
Joined: 5 years ago

#4: Post by STG (original poster) »

Capuchin Monk wrote:Nice!

How do you empty out the chaff, just pull down the bottom collector?
Exactly. It's just a slip fit on the reducer. It's held on with a screw clamp that wasn't on when I took the photo.

greggakel
Posts: 16
Joined: 1 year ago

#5: Post by greggakel »

@STG - Nice setup. I'm about to build my own as well. With regard to the fan/blower:
  • How does the fan/blower you purchased compare with the fan that came with the Huky?
  • What other parts did you need to purchase with that fan/blower from Aliexpress? I see you need to wire it to a plug to connect it to a power source.
  • Are there any future cleaning considerations? That is, is there a concern that the motor will become damaged from the exhaust or other bits that may collect in or near it? Or is the motor already protected similar to how it would be in a vacuum?
Cheers!

-Greg-

STG (original poster)
Posts: 164
Joined: 5 years ago

#6: Post by STG (original poster) replying to greggakel »

1. I mean, it's entirely different. WAY more powerful. A 1.5 setting is more than enough, 2, you start sucking more beans up than you'd like. It also sounds kind of odd at low speeds.
2. It's not really the community's preference, it's just that another user had suggested it and it seemed reasonable so I gave it a shot. We'll see how long it lasts.
3. I got the speed control with it and you'll need a 12V power supply.
4. The only thing it's protected by is the cyclone itself. I've already put chaff through it during testing and it did not seem to mind it at all. With the speed set correctly, zero chaff makes it through the cyclone. It works quite well.

greggakel
Posts: 16
Joined: 1 year ago

#7: Post by greggakel »

@STG - Cool. I did see that fan used elsewhere when I originally researched what people were doing and then saw you referenced that fan as well.

Is there a concern with the voltage and that damaging any electrics? I have a builder-friend who will help mash this cyclone together. His immediate concern was that the fan doesn't take much to run. He used the example of, "If we're pulling in 240V and the fan runs on 20V, then where does the rest of the energy go?" The concern was amplified (oh the puns) when we discussed wiring because he seemed to think there was still a potential for the fan plug/wires to be live when unplugged from the motor speed regulator. And there was this general concern that it could all overheat and potentially risk fires.

Not sure if any of those concerns have weight here? Or if people with similar setups have experienced overheating or hat to mitigate fire risks, etc.

All that said, how do you power the fan? Is it coming off the mains? Are you using some sort of battery setup? Etc.

THANKS!

STG (original poster)
Posts: 164
Joined: 5 years ago

#8: Post by STG (original poster) replying to greggakel »

Hi Greg like I mentioned above, you must use a 12V power supply to run the fan because it is a 12V DC fan. The 12V power supply converts line, in your case 240V AC to 12V DC by means of a transformer and other electrical components. This is a very common arrangement with many electrical devices and should not pose a safety concern if done correctly.

Capuchin Monk
Posts: 1275
Joined: 15 years ago

#9: Post by Capuchin Monk »

greggakel wrote:Not sure if any of those concerns have weight here? Or if people with similar setups have experienced overheating or hat to mitigate fire risks, etc.
I've heard of possible flame within the roasting chamber due to chaff catching fire. For such event, roasters have a water squirt bottle handy during the roasting session. If needed, they squirt it through the trier hole.
All that said, how do you power the fan? Is it coming off the mains? Are you using some sort of battery setup? Etc.
I'm not sure what particular models are available in UK or EU but they are typically called "wall wart" DC supply plug. They convert outlet AC to DC either dedicated voltage or adjustable.

greggakel
Posts: 16
Joined: 1 year ago

#10: Post by greggakel »

STG wrote:Hi Greg like I mentioned above, you must use a 12V power supply to run the fan because it is a 12V DC fan. The 12V power supply converts line, in your case 240V AC to 12V DC by means of a transformer and other electrical components. This is a very common arrangement with many electrical devices and should not pose a safety concern if done correctly.
Thanks! I didn't follow the original comment. Apologies for making your repeat and clarify yourself. Much appreciated though!!!
Capuchin Monk wrote:I'm not sure what particular models are available in UK or EU but they are typically called "wall wart" DC supply plug. They convert outlet AC to DC either dedicated voltage or adjustable.
This is ace! I think I found the solution: https://amzn.eu/d/c5pQ7F0 The info from Amazon is copied below.

Shipenophy Switching Power Supply Driver Transformer 220V (or 110v) to 12V 6.5A 80W Good Driver 12x9x4
  • High Working Efficiency: Small DC ripple of the switching power supply transformer, which has high work efficiency., 12v 83.3a 1000w power supply
  • 2u power supply, Short circuit protection, overload protection, over voltage protection, switching power supply 230v 50hz to 13.5v, over current protection, over temperature protection.
  • Low operating temperature and long service life.
  • Strong Anti Interference Performance: The switching power supply transformer has good anti interference performance and high reliability.
  • Transformer Switching has small and compact size, high power density, Short circuit protection, overload protection, over voltage protection, over current protection, over temperature protection.