Versalab M3 Grinder - Page 13

Behind the scenes of the site's upcoming equipment reviews.
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Teme

#121: Post by Teme »

Abe Carmeli wrote:Here the Mazzer is faster and more convenient. It takes ~ 20 seconds to grind for a shot. The Mazzer will grind enough coffee for 2 shots at that time frame, and you don't need to attend to it as it grinds.
Thank you for the summary Abe. I assume that the 20 seconds is for a double shot (as it was noted earlier on in the thread)?

By the way, any views regarding the quality of the components, the finish of the grinder and potential durability?

Also, what size are the burrs?

Br,
Teme

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another_jim
Team HB

#122: Post by another_jim »

Teme wrote:
By the way, any views regarding the quality of the components, the finish of the grinder and potential durability?

Also, what size are the burrs?
The flat burr is 64mm, iirc, don't know about the conical one. The flat burr size is deceptive. Because the conical burr does the rough bean breaking, the coarse grinding surface is a lot larger compared to the similar size Cimbali Cadet or Mazzer Jolly burrs -- see my previous posts on the topic.

The grinder section is massively solid, but so are those of commercial grinders. My take is that there is more metal on the mounts and better mounts on the drive shaft; whether this makes a difference I don't know.

Andy published a link to the Bodine DC motor used on the unit. Going DC involves the addition of a rectifier board, but allows one to set the motor speed on a pot. Bodine motors have a very good reputation, so I doubt there will be any problem in that regard. The only thought I have is this: Generally grinders this size use 350 to 450 watt AC motors rather than 110 watt dc motors. DC motors have greater torque, but my guess is that operating this grinder at higher speeds will be difficult -- the motor is sized for low speed grinding only.

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AndyS

#123: Post by AndyS »

another_jim wrote: Going DC involves the addition of a rectifier board, but allows one to set the motor speed on a pot. Bodine motors have a very good reputation, so I doubt there will be any problem in that regard. The only thought I have is this: Generally grinders this size use 350 to 450 watt AC motors rather than 110 watt dc motors. DC motors have greater torque, but my guess is that operating this grinder at higher speeds will be difficult -- the motor is sized for low speed grinding only.
And, John Bicht from Versa is of the opinion that speeding up the grinder has a negative effect on the flavor of the resulting espresso.
-AndyS
VST refractometer/filter basket beta tester, no financial interest in the company

Abe Carmeli
Team HB

#124: Post by Abe Carmeli »

AndyS wrote: And, John Bicht from Versa is of the opinion that speeding up the grinder has a negative effect on the flavor of the resulting espresso.
I concluded a week of working with the grinder at a lower speed (I guestimate it to be around 300-350 rpm, but I have no way to tell.) I could not detect any advantage in the cup when compared with the standard speed of 500 rpm.
Abe Carmeli

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AndyS

#125: Post by AndyS »

another_jim wrote:The flat burr is 64mm, iirc
The famous Angelo Minicozzi from Espresso Parts Source asked me to post that the flat burrs are actually 68mm OD.
-AndyS
VST refractometer/filter basket beta tester, no financial interest in the company

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luthier

#126: Post by luthier »

Image

My new static-cling grinding scale.
You've been perfecting your technique for a long time...... So have I.

Abe Carmeli
Team HB

#127: Post by Abe Carmeli »

luthier wrote:My new static-cling grinding scale.
Nice setup, but how did you fix it in place? My concern would be that if the scale is only clinging and not really fixed to the dial it will shift in position.
Abe Carmeli

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luthier

#128: Post by luthier »

Abe Carmeli wrote:
Nice setup, but how did you fix it in place? My concern would be that if the scale is only clinging and not really fixed to the dial it will shift in position.
After polishing the contact surface with metal polish, the static force and the friction will do the job well.
It won't shift at all.
You've been perfecting your technique for a long time...... So have I.

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AndyS

#129: Post by AndyS »

luthier wrote:My new static-cling grinding scale.
I'd humbly suggest that you redo your scale so that it has 100 graduations for one full turn. Then we all have the scale, with a common frame of reference for comparison.
-AndyS
VST refractometer/filter basket beta tester, no financial interest in the company

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luthier

#130: Post by luthier »

Half a turn is enough for my usage.(from espresso to drip)
It has about 110 graduations(110mm, or 11cm) for half a turn. Btw, I drew this scale in autoCAD.
You've been perfecting your technique for a long time...... So have I.