Which side is the top on this heating element? - Page 3

Equipment doesn't work? Troubleshooting? If you're handy, members can help.
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guijan12

#21: Post by guijan12 »

espressojoe wrote:Thanks Ira! Check this out. I think this is correct (assuming that the soldered tube lines up and I believe it does). The original wiring (before I dismantled it) is in last pic. The black and orange wire on the right go to the pressurestat.

image

I agree with Jake; its 180 degrees out.
Don't care about the soldered tube: that is probably used to insert a temperature probe.
If you do not have it in your machine, the tube is of no use.

Is it a EU machine and heating element?
That would mean it is meant for preferably 3x400V, in delta.
Or 230V in star.



I believe it is lined up in star now, but you can only be sure after measuring the elements electrical resistance.
It would explain why it takes ages to heat up.
Regards,

Guido

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Jake_G
Team HB

#22: Post by Jake_G »

Indeed most commercial machines are wired from the factory to support 3 phase mains power, but pretty much all US machines are adapted for 240V split phase, as this one is.

This is accomplished by jumping two of the phases together on the main power switch and adding the shorting bars to the element as this one has them.

This is a simple 120V "A-phase" on the left or "a" leads of the coils and 120V "B-phase" on the right or "b" leads of the coils. The fact that there are two wires on the right side is just a result of using what was already there, since the machine is able to run 3-phase by removing the jumper from the main power switch.

Cheers!

- Jake
LMWDP #704

espressojoe (original poster)

#23: Post by espressojoe (original poster) »

Thanks guys! This is way over my head. Are we still on track to install the wires according to my drawing (below)? If yes, what would I be looking for when I attach an Ohm meter? When "180 out" was mentioned is that a reference to the rotation of the heating element compared to the original?



Thanks!
Joe

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Jake_G
Team HB

#24: Post by Jake_G »

You should wire it like this:


Writing on the bottom, two shorting bars on the left three terminals with the wire on any if the three joined terminals (I drew it on what would be the bottom left, but yours was wired to the center - either is fine) and then put the shorting bar on the right side between the center and upper terminal with the black wire in the center right terminal and the orange shielded wire on the bottom right (again, I drew these wrong, but it really doesn't matter, just make it look like it did before).

Make sense?
LMWDP #704

espressojoe (original poster)

#25: Post by espressojoe (original poster) »

In your drawing, it looks like the black wire would be solo and in the original the black wire was tied to another by that metal connector (the orange wire on the right is the solo wire)...


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Jake_G
Team HB

#26: Post by Jake_G »

You can flip the orange and black if you like with no ill effect, but you are correct that I drew it wrong.
LMWDP #704

espressojoe (original poster)

#27: Post by espressojoe (original poster) »

Thanks. Is my drawing incorrect? I thought that since the heating elements seems to line up with that soldered pipe or thermostat (pictured below) that the wires should then line up as pictured in the 2nd photo below (with the writing on the left side of the new element).



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Jake_G
Team HB

#28: Post by Jake_G »

The only problem is that the element on the left side is upside down.

You can't install it that way.

Spin it around so that the writing is on the bottom and then you will be ok.
LMWDP #704

espressojoe (original poster)

#29: Post by espressojoe (original poster) »

Yes, that was my plan. So I guess there's more than one way to skin a cat on the installation of the heating element. If I have an Ohm meter, is it possible to know if I've got it right before plugging it in? If i turn it on and it's not correct will it just blow the fuse? It's on a 110v dedicated GFI.

Thanks again!
Joe

ira
Team HB

#30: Post by ira »

Measure the three connected together to both the single and to the two connected together. The single should be double the reading of the two connected.