Shorting heating element

Equipment doesn't work? Troubleshooting? If you're handy, members can help.
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Chert

Postby Chert » Mar 29, 2019, 3:58 pm

With a Maximatic that is shorting my GFCI, I need to perform this:OE Heating element repair

high temperature epoxy, glyptal, and teflon collars are needed, but that is the issue. I looked about the extensive Cremina video collection Doug and Barb produced (WOW!) but I don't see any mention of where to purchase these items. JB weld has high temp epoxy putty about $8 and I see a small quant of electrical sealant paint on Amazon, not specifically glytpal. I don't need a quart. But I don't know where to find teflon collars.

Also, anyone suggest an additional possible method? A sealant that after the drying step might be wicked into the bases of the element and cure out to prevent water ingress?

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yakster

Postby yakster » Mar 29, 2019, 4:29 pm

Here's a bottle of Glyptal on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/MG-Chemicals-GLP ... 008OA7DDK/

Maybe if you can figure out the ID and the OD that you need you could source a bit of Teflon tubing to use instead of a Teflon collar.
-Chris

LMWDP # 272

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BaristaBoy E61

Postby BaristaBoy E61 » Mar 29, 2019, 4:32 pm

Might it be possible to find someone that repairs or rebuilds heating elements commercially for the restaurant or HVAC business that might be able to complete this process for you at a nominal cost?
"You didn't buy an Espresso Machine - You bought a Chemistry Set!"

jwCrema

Postby jwCrema » Mar 29, 2019, 5:12 pm

You have at least three options. One option is to go to the closest Cenex to see what repair materials they have in the espresso machine department.

The second option, which I recommend, is to purchase a new heating element. The Maxi has had a long life, and is still being produced. Cerini Coffee in NY is the US Dealer and they will sell you an element.

The third option is an off shoot of the second option. But it could save you a lot of money, is to look at the wattage and dimensions of the element and use Google to hunt one down. It's totally possible. I've done it. If you need help PM me. I'm in your timezone.

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Chert

Postby Chert » Mar 29, 2019, 7:34 pm

yakster wrote:Here's a bottle of Glyptal on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/MG-Chemicals-GLP ... 008OA7DDK/

Maybe if you can figure out the ID and the OD that you need you could source a bit of Teflon tubing to use instead of a Teflon collar.


Thanks. That one is similar to what I saw, but it states that it is gliptal. And cheaper.

I wander if tubing is how OE made the teflon bumpers. The project is written up so well, just not specifics on two of the three needed items.
jwCrema wrote:You have at least three options. One option is to go to the closest Cenex to see what repair materials they have in the espresso machine department.

The second option, which I recommend, is to purchase a new heating element. The Maxi has had a long life, and is still being produced. Cerini Coffee in NY is the US Dealer and they will sell you an element.

The third option is an off shoot of the second option. But it could save you a lot of money, is to look at the wattage and dimensions of the element and use Google to hunt one down. It's totally possible. I've done it. If you need help PM me. I'm in your timezone.


I still with the very first option unless I determine I cannot achieve it: repair it myself. I'll check out Cenex.

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drgary
Team HB

Postby drgary » Mar 30, 2019, 10:28 am

+1

If it's a water short it's not hard to fix once you source or fabricate the materials. Also, Flint, I don't know if you need the PTFE sheath. If you want to coat that rod you could build up the epoxy a bit more. Added: Or better yet, see the responses immediately following this one.
Gary
LMWDP#308

What I WOULD do for a good cup of coffee!

OldNuc

Postby OldNuc » Mar 30, 2019, 3:16 pm

Actually once you get it all baked out and it is definitely dry all that is required is to coat the area between the outer sheath and the center contact with glyptal and bake dry at 140F or so. Apply 3 to 4 coats and bake each one and allow cooling to ambient in between coats. The little ceramic or teflon tubes or epoxy serve no electrical purpose but are just structural supports to preclude inadvertent shorting due to displacement. If you want to add them use a high temperature epoxy that is NOT metal filled or a split teflon tube that you then bond into place with another final coat of glyptal. Doug wrote those instructions to cover all cases and all levels of experience.
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Paul_Pratt

Postby Paul_Pratt » Mar 31, 2019, 6:13 am

The baking element procedure does work very well, I believe I have even read that some industrial elements are required to be "run-in" and their insulation increases after they get used.

I successfully used the Orphans procedures the past few weeks and was able to save my beloved Pavoni Eurobar and an old Marzocco element from the 70's. Both would trip the GFCI / RCD and an insulation test with my Megger confirmed that with low readings. An hour or so in the oven and the Megger readings were excellent.

Instead of glyptal I used some bog standard RTV silicone down inside and was able to reuse the original ceramic bushings. As others have said the glyptal seals and the ceramic/teflon sleeve stabilises the terminal post to prevent it from moving. You can use anything to achieve the same function - as long as it does not conduct electricity of course.
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