Screen problem with my Rocket R9 One

Equipment doesn't work? Troubleshooting? If you're handy, members can help.
Anwarsulami
Posts: 2
Joined: 1 year ago

#1: Post by Anwarsulami »

Hi,

So my R9's control screen froze so i turned of my machine using the knob and turned it on thirty minutes later.

However, the machine turned on the boilers started heating everything was functional except the screen was stuck in the Off mode and when clicking the on/off button no response. The only response i get is when i click the technician button in the bottom left (please see picture attached)




Please help me fix this

Thanks a lot!

ron231
Posts: 51
Joined: 8 years ago

#2: Post by ron231 »

I went through similar with my R60 years ago, and have since heard many horror stories about shipping expensive heavy machines for repair.


If you ship it out, there is a high chance that it will get broken and then you will have to spend a year plus fighting for your money.

Good luck (hug)

Anwarsulami (original poster)
Posts: 2
Joined: 1 year ago

#3: Post by Anwarsulami (original poster) »

I have contacted my local supplier and they will replace it for me. I didnt even get the chance to use it.

It pains to see expensive machinery get shipped out with manufacturer defects. I have heard stories since then about this model specifically having manufacturer defects.

WWWired
Posts: 352
Joined: 5 years ago

#4: Post by WWWired »

Hi Anwarsulami :) What a shame this occurred. It is likely something that occurred during shipping as the company would not have put something like that into a customer's hands. The Rocket R9 is a beautiful and brilliant machine and great to hear you have a replacement on the way! That is excellent news for sure! :)

Unfortunately, the more electronics that are added to these machines, the more care is needed in handling them. Often times many of the measurement components on higher quality espresso machines depend on extremely precise specifications. I've noticed in some comments folks looking for machines that have basic mechanical control and switching internally. Like a car from the 70's, they can be fixed with a foot of bailing wire, a wrench and a screwdriver haha . . . if a piece of software on modern machines decides it can't figure out the oscillations in a heating cycle and bungles the set point targeting on a steam boiler, things get pretty sketchy. The more bells and whistles on these machines means more care in their handling is a good thing :)