Food safe adhesive - Page 2

Equipment doesn't work? Troubleshooting? If you're handy, members can help.
jpender

#11: Post by jpender »

rmongiovi wrote:The thing to worry about is that once you've glued that magnet back in it's going to be in there to stay so make absolutely sure you've got the polarity right.
Cyanoacrylate bonds can be undone. Acetone will break it down. Heat will also weaken the bond. If it's a metal doser you could get the magnet really hot to loosen it up. I was repairing the metal hinge on a pair of eyeglasses and that darn superglue bonded too fast, before I could get the hinge installed correctly. I used a bic lighter to release it.

TallDan

#12: Post by TallDan »

I'm confused as to why decent even suggests a food safe glue. A tiny dab of glue under the magnet in that part of the funnel shouldn't ever touch any coffee. Even ground coffee that somehow touches the magnet seems likely to end up on your countertop, not in the portafilter. CYA, I suppose.

jpender

#13: Post by jpender »

TallDan wrote:CYA, I suppose.
Well, yeah. Wouldn't you make the same recommendation, even without a lawyer telling you to? It's one thing to make a decision for yourself but advising customers is different.

Do we even know with certainty how safe Super Glue or one of the dozens of other "super glues" really is? Would you eat a tube of it? Even if you were sure that cyanoacrylate is okay to swallow what about the other unlisted proprietary ingredients?

I wouldn't worry about it in this case. But I wouldn't use it to glue a broken coffee cup back together.

TallDan

#14: Post by TallDan »

I have used it to glue a couple broken coffee mugs together. If it's just the handle, I'll still use it for coffee. If it's actually part of the mug that touches coffee, that mug gets moved to shaving or pen holder duty.

That's relevant here because, to me, gluing the magnet into the funnel is like gluing the handle on the mug. It never contacts the coffee.

jpender

#15: Post by jpender »

TallDan wrote:That's relevant here because, to me, gluing the magnet into the funnel is like gluing the handle on the mug. It never contacts the coffee.
I agree with you that it's not a concern in this instance.

But suppose it were a super deadly toxic glue, one that would kill you if you ingested a picogram of it. Would you still be as sure about it "never" contacting any of the grounds?

TallDan

#16: Post by TallDan » replying to jpender »

That's more than a bit hyperbolic. There isn't such a glue. There isn't even any substance that is toxic at such a level. Botulism toxin is considered the most potent, and people inject that into their faces at doses larger than a picogram.

I think it's safe to assume that we're talking about glues that are readily available at retail stores, which are not anywhere near that toxic, especially when dried/cured.

NicoNYC

#17: Post by NicoNYC »

jpender wrote:I agree with you that it's not a concern in this instance.

But suppose it were a super deadly toxic glue, one that would kill you if you ingested a picogram of it. Would you still be as sure about it "never" contacting any of the grounds?
I'd expect that a product toxic in such minute doses would never make it to market, at least not from a reputable company. Hell I don't know how they'd manufacture something that dangerous without employees dropping like flies.

Speaking of reputable company, all of them publish SDSs (Safety Data Sheets) for their products. These sheets break down the hazards of their products; flammability, health (skin contact, inhalation, ingestion, carcinogenic), as well as what to do in the event of ingestion, inhalation, etc. It's not a comprehensive accounting of every danger, but it's a good way to gauge the overall toxicity of a product.
LMWDP #718

jpender

#18: Post by jpender »

I was just trying to make the point that there is potential contact. And there is some level of concern about toxicity -- otherwise why wouldn't you glue your cup back together when the the broken part touches coffee? So it isn't a question of if, it's a question of how much, and how potentially toxic the substance is.

Risk aversion is another factor, assuming it's a personal decision. I have used small amounts of JB Weld inside my moka pots and espresso machine where the cured epoxy was bathed in boiling water that ended up in my cup. I don't know how many gallons of JB Weld infused liquid I've consumed over the years. JB Weld is considered non-toxic but is not FDA food safe. There are reasons to be concerned about consuming it. I'm not too worried. But if I were selling a product to someone I sure wouldn't tell them to do the same thing.

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yakster
Supporter ♡

#19: Post by yakster »

Weber Workshops tells users to use super glue to reattach magnets in their magic tumblers and funnels.
-Chris

LMWDP # 272

JJ La Moore (original poster)

#20: Post by JJ La Moore (original poster) »

Thanks for all the replies. I'll use super glue to stick the magnets back in -- after making sure I've got the polarity right, of course. Cheers.