Elektra Microcasa a Leva boiler leak problem - Page 2

Equipment doesn't work? Troubleshooting? If you're handy, members can help.
User avatar
SimonPatrice (original poster)

#11: Post by SimonPatrice (original poster) »

rpavlis wrote:
Polishing away the pitted area and treatment with strong carbonate solutions, allowing the part to soak for a few hours can be used as treatment.
Thanks for the detailed explanation. What would you use to polish the different areas? I'm guessing the inside of the boiler would have to be polished too? When you talk about soaking the boiler in a strong carbonate solution, what exactly do you mean? (keeping in mind that my champs d'expertise? are music and education and not chemistry. :wink: )
Patrice
LMWDP #428

User avatar
rpavlis

#12: Post by rpavlis »

Simply dissolve baking soda or "washing soda", sodium bicarbonate or carbonate respectively in water until no more will dissolve. Leave this solution in contact with the area for a while. Polishes like Bar Keeper's Friend can remove light problems. The really important thing is to get rid of the insoluble copper compounds where the corrosion is occurring.

Weber Workshops: tools for building better coffee
Sponsored by Weber Workshops
User avatar
SimonPatrice (original poster)

#13: Post by SimonPatrice (original poster) » replying to rpavlis »

So, since most corrosion necessarily started from the inside of the boiler I should also do this to the inside of the boiler, right? Do you think I could just fill the boiler with the sodium bicarbonate solution, leave it there for a while and then rinse thoroughly? I guess what I want to know is if I really need to disassemble the whole machine to try to polish the inside as well?

Thanks for all the help!
Patrice
LMWDP #428

User avatar
drgary
Team HB

#14: Post by drgary »

Are these just pinholes or bigger leaks? If pinholes I expect filling the boiler with solution and rinsing should be enough. If larger leaks you might need a more aggressive repair, like brazing.
Gary
LMWDP#308

What I WOULD do for a good cup of coffee!

User avatar
SimonPatrice (original poster)

#15: Post by SimonPatrice (original poster) »

drgary wrote:Are these just pinholes or bigger leaks? If pinholes I expect filling the boiler with solution and rinsing should be enough. If larger leaks you might need a more aggressive repair, like brazing.
Just pinholes. Actually, water is leaking from only one place so far but I can see that it wouldn't take long for other corroded areas to start leaking as well.
Simply dissolve baking soda or "washing soda", sodium bicarbonate or carbonate respectively in water until no more will dissolve. Leave this solution in contact with the area for a while. Polishes like Bar Keeper's Friend can remove light problems. The really important thing is to get rid of the insoluble copper compounds where the corrosion is occurring.
So, just to make sure I get this right:

1st step, fill the boiler with a sodium bicarbonate solution and let set for a while (minutes? hours?)
2nd step, apply the same solution to the corroded areas on the outside of the boiler (I still have to figure out the best way for the solution to stay in contact with those areas for a while).
3rd step, polish the corroded areas on the outside of the boiler.
4th step have the pinole silver brazed or silver soldered so that it doesn't leak anymore.

Does this make sense?

Rpvalis. what should the corroded areas look like after being treated with the sodium bicarbonate solution?

Thanks!
Patrice
LMWDP #428

User avatar
drgary
Team HB

#16: Post by drgary »

4th step could be to use Loctite as mentioned earlier to seal the pinholes. That would be much less expensive than paying someone to silver solder or braze.
Gary
LMWDP#308

What I WOULD do for a good cup of coffee!

User avatar
rpavlis

#17: Post by rpavlis »

It should not have any spots that look somewhat like rust on it any more. It should not be porous. The carbonate tends to displace the chloride from the solids on the surface, and the carbonates can be easily removed. A bit of something like vinegar after washing off the carbonate solution would also help get rid of the last traces of the chlorides. The chloride is the real villain here. That is why one should use water with very low chloride.

BPlus: turning your coffee spirit
Sponsored by BPlus
User avatar
SimonPatrice (original poster)

#18: Post by SimonPatrice (original poster) »

drgary wrote:4th step could be to use Loctite as mentioned earlier to seal the pinholes. That would be much less expensive than paying someone to silver solder or braze.
The Loctite would be strong enough even with the pressure from the boiler?
Patrice
LMWDP #428

User avatar
drgary
Team HB

#19: Post by drgary »

I would not suggest it if it didn't work for me and others. It is a specific type with wicking properties.

Using Loctite 290 to seal small cracks and pin holes in boilers

/downloads/ ... atalog.pdf
Gary
LMWDP#308

What I WOULD do for a good cup of coffee!

User avatar
SimonPatrice (original poster)

#20: Post by SimonPatrice (original poster) »

drgary wrote:I would not suggest it if it didn't work for me and others.
I didn't mean to offence you in any away. It's just that with three kids around the machine, I want to make sure that scalding water that's under pressure doesn't make its way out of the boiler. Which Loctite product would you recommend?

I really appreciate the numerous advice.
Patrice
LMWDP #428