Bezzera BZ10 trips circuit breaker, microswitch replacement? - Page 2

Equipment doesn't work? Troubleshooting? If you're handy, members can help.
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BaristaBoy E61

#11: Post by BaristaBoy E61 »

Replacing a switch will not fix the problem's origin that is a water leak.
Without addressing the origin you've only treated the symptom. This new part will fail again.
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cafeIKE
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#12: Post by cafeIKE »

If those connecters are not replaced, they will probably be trouble in the future. Corrosion is visible on the blue lead. The red lead looks slightly blackened.



Any line that can be exposed to wire MUST have a drip loop so that water cannot access the connection except by direct spray.

IMO, assembly like this is planned obsolescence / designed to require repair. Shameful!

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aoleg (original poster)

#13: Post by aoleg (original poster) »

BaristaBoy E61 wrote:Replacing a switch will not fix the problem's origin that is a water leak.
Without addressing the origin you've only treated the symptom. This new part will fail again.
Very true. The problem is that Bezzera *designed* it like this. There is no water leak. The water gets there with every refill of the water reservoir. A few drops of water on any side of the water reservoir left after each refill will inevitably land on the switch, because there is no path for the water to escape other than the hole above it.

This is ill design, and I am still thinking how to fix it. A dome-shaped rubber seal or something. This is the second revision of the BZ10 that was released some time in 2017, so Bezzera must be confident that it's OK to have an electric switch directly behind the open water tank. I wonder how this was ever approved internally, and how it managed to pass through the EU and international safety regulations.

aoleg (original poster)

#14: Post by aoleg (original poster) »

cafeIKE wrote:If those connecters are not replaced, they will probably be trouble in the future. Corrosion is visible on the blue lead. The red lead looks slightly blackened.
Double-checked the wires. The red lead is OK, no signs of corrosion (the blackening does not look to be of the harmful type). The blue lead was slightly oxidized; when I was replacing the part, I cleaned it with a metal brush. That said, I will keep looking for new wires; unlike the microswitch, which is a numbered part, the wires are a bit difficult to source.
cafeIKE wrote:Any line that can be exposed to wire MUST have a drip loop so that water cannot access the connection except by direct spray. IMO, assembly like this is planned obsolescence / designed to require repair. Shameful!
I am sure it wasn't planned; it seems like a stupid design carried over from other models through decades. If caught, this design would not pass through EU safety regulations for kitchen appliances. This is worse than the much cheaper machines I used before.