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PIXIllate
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#531: Post by PIXIllate »

decent_espresso wrote:PCBs getting finished being made this week, and then they're getting assembled. I'm supposed to get them at the end of May.
Thanks. I think my Simple Scale is getting ready to pack it in so here's hoping it holds out a few more months. Looking forward to it.

Decent is one of those black hole companies for me, like Kafatek. You resist it at first but the longer you think about it the more sense it makes to just spend the money and put yourself out of your misery. Now that I have a Monolith the pull is getting stronger.

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decent_espresso (original poster)
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#532: Post by decent_espresso (original poster) »

Good milk swirl

Dennis Hew shows the swirling pattern you want to achieve when steaming, so as to get perfect microfoam that also makes great latte art.

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decent_espresso (original poster)
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#533: Post by decent_espresso (original poster) »

PIXIllate wrote:Thanks. I think my Simple Scale is getting ready to pack it in so here's hoping it holds out a few more months. Looking forward to it. .
Drop us an email at http://decentespresso.com/contact and we'll replace the Simple Scale for you, at the same time we send you the Decent Scale.

PIXIllate
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#534: Post by PIXIllate » replying to decent_espresso »

Thanks John but there's no need for that. As long as it survives until the replacement gets here it's served it's purpose and been well worth it.

Get those DE1's back in production and keep pushing espresso forward.

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Chert
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#535: Post by Chert »

This idea got the tiniest bit of traction and I suppose a machine without surround would neither speed up the production process nor reduce the cost much, but what about that? Any espresso machine's form and unique design advertises for the maker but the home market doesn't do that for you much compared to the burgeoning commercial. I could seriously lighten my Astoria Argenta by recycling its innards and putting a Decent Pro 220 machine under the hood.
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Randy G.

#536: Post by Randy G. »

Yesterday I finished the full installation of my DE1XL. It is now fully plumber in and out. I will say that it went very well. After use of a couple of weeks or so I can make two (hopefully) constructive comments:
1 - The non-plumbed ceramic drip tray is very easy to dislodge since the very smooth, high-quality ceramic tray's bottom has nothing to get it engaged into the frame. It is designed to easily slide out, but at times it has the potential to slide out too easily. I applied small, clear vinyl(?) cabinet bumpers to the frame and it makes it nearly impossible to accidentally bump it out of place.

2 - The plumbed drip tray presents a couple of difficulties:
a - The 'nipple' on the bottom of the tray is quite short and tapered. The short length give little purchase for the silicone hose included which has a tight, ninety degree angle to direct the flow towards the back of the machine. Unfortunately, the nipple's taper decreases towards the tip instead of getting a bit wider towards the tip. It was a challenge keeping the hose in place while I use two tie wraps to secure it. it popped off a couple of times before I was successful. A flare at the tip of the nipple, or maybe just a groove at the point it meets the tray might solve that problem.
b - If a home, custom installation is being done, a sanitary installation of the drip tray will be difficult because a sufficient length of drain hose must be left the allow the drip tray to be slid forward. This needs to be done to occasionally clean the reservoir tray even if the machine is using the Plumbing Kit. The adhesive nature of silicone tubing exasperates the sliding of the drip tray without pulling the hose off the fitting. So a bit of excess hose needs to be supplied to eliminate the need to detach the hose from the other end and to try to avoid dislodging the hose from the tray.

If you are plumbed with a recessed installation with the drain hose going straight down into a cabinet from the exposed bottom of the machine much of the above is not a problem, and that seems to have been the intention of the overall design of the plumbed drip tray. This solution to run the hose out the rear of the machine under both the drip tray and the reservoir is a bit of a second-best solution, particularly in terms of convenience.

Beyond that, the espresso my wife and I have been enjoying has been and the control I have over the process have both been quite remarkable. Finally, control over the process.
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#537: Post by dmw010 »

Randy, thanks for the plumbing report and suggestions. I should be getting my DE1PRO next week and will have to use the silicone elbow for the drip tray.

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decent_espresso (original poster)
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#538: Post by decent_espresso (original poster) »

"BEST PRACTICE" espresso profile now available.

I've been working on a "best practices" espresso profile, incorporate the best practices we've found in the five years we've been shipping the Decent Espresso machine.

I'm very much looking for a better name, but I'm not going to name it after me (some people suggested), as all I've done is poach 3 other people's good work (Damian Brakel, Scott Rao, Jonathan Gagné) and merged it into one unified profile.

Here is what I think is "best practice" about this profile:
  • quick fill of group head at the start of preinfusion
  • low pressure preinfusion, to assist capillary action in fast, even wetting
  • slightly softened pressure rise to avoid channeling that a hard rise can cause
  • extraction phase switches to flow profiling, for automatic channel healing.
  • extraction phase has a linear flow rate ramp up over time, to keep constant water contact time, instead of using pressure profiling to approximate this
  • extraction phase uses pressure limiting, so as to never go above the set max pressure (9 bar)
  • the extraction phase decides the end-flow rate relative to flow at peak pressure. This adapts the profile to the grind size (not yet implemented) -- this comes from Gagne's work.
  • accurate stop-at-volume closely matches scale weight, because of a fully successful preinfusion
  • a smooth puck resistance curve is achieved
Some of the "best practices" here were originally discovered on traditional machines:
  • several machines (such as Kees's Idromatic) have a quick fill, followed by a soft-pressure-rise feature built into the group, and manual lever users have done this for years
  • pressurized preinfusion is fairly common in traditional machines, but to my knowledge, no traditional machine implements this by measuring puck pressure. Instead they measure pressure-behind-a-flow-constrictor, which gives different results.
Here is a photo using this profile. The traces behind are my Londinium god-shot, which was my reference to try to imitate, but hopefully improve.



Things to note about my shot pull that are different than the Londinium god shot reference:
  • the pressure rises both start at 0:12 but the "best practices" profile takes a few seconds longer, and has a linear pressure rise
  • the flow rate down/up bump of Londinium, which occurs as max pressure is hit, is mostly gone with this profile
  • pressure has a flick up around 0:25, due to fines migration, visible now due to the constant flow. With Londinium, this fines migration is visible as a flattening & decreasing of the flow. The extraction theory I'm adhering to doesn't think that the flow rate declining in a shot, is a good thing, so this is the biggest difference between Londinium and Best Practices profile.
This profile is now in the 'nightly' build of de1app, or make it by hand with the images below.

Note: I have not yet implemented the "mutating" aspect of this profile, which is to have it change the final goal flow rate based on the flow rate at the end of the "pressurize" stage. It's currently set manually (default: 2.2ml/s) and you'll want to adjust this so that it's (in my experience between 0.5ml/s and 1.0 ml/s) more than the pressure you observe at peak pressure.

-john

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#539: Post by decent_espresso (original poster) »

Randy G. wrote: a - The 'nipple' on the bottom of the tray is quite short and tapered. The short length give little purchase for the silicone hose included which has a tight, ninety degree angle to direct the flow towards the back of the machine. Unfortunately, the nipple's taper decreases towards the tip instead of getting a bit wider towards the tip. It was a challenge keeping the hose in place while I use two tie wraps to secure it. it popped off a couple of times before I was successful. A flare at the tip of the nipple, or maybe just a groove at the point it meets the tray might solve that problem.
There should have been a cable tie provided with your kit, which is there to be cinched around the silicone tube, once you have mounted it over the exit of the drip tray.

It sounds like you used your to accomplish the same thing?


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Randy G.

#540: Post by Randy G. »

decent_espresso wrote:There should have been a cable tie provided with your kit, which is there to be cinched around the silicone tube, once you have mounted it over the exit of the drip tray.It sounds like you used your to accomplish the same thing?
There was one included, John. I tried it in my first attempt, and as I pulled it tight the tube got 'squeezed' off the drip tray. So I pulled a couple more out of my stock and tried again. I had to be very diligent to get it to hold; firmly pushing the tube onto the tray to set the end of the tube up against the base of the tray as I tightened the first tie wrap.
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