Trying to Date a La Pavoni Europiccola

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Billbell3

#1: Post by Billbell3 »

Greetings,

I'm having trouble finding which years a recent La Pavoni I purchased was manufactured. I do know it has a four-post heating element and the element base and collar are not bolted on, only secured by threading onto the boiler.
Thanks in advance
Bill

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grind727

#2: Post by grind727 »

Have you seen Francesco's site? It has nearly everything you would ever need to know about La Pavonis and their history, including their different iterations through the years. If not, this should help you narrow it down.

http://www.francescoceccarelli.eu/lapavoni_eng.htm

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Randy G.

#3: Post by Randy G. »

grind727 wrote:Have you seen Francesco's site? It has nearly everything you would ever need to know about La Pavonis and their history, including their different iterations through the years. If not, this should help you narrow it down.
http://www.francescoceccarelli.eu/lapavoni_eng.htm
...and http://www.francescoceccarelli.eu/lapavoni_pr_eng.htm .
Espresso! My Espresso! - http://www.EspressoMyEspresso.com
LMWDP #644

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peacecup

#4: Post by peacecup »

I dated a Pavoni on and off for a while but finally settled down with a Ponte Vecchio.. :D
LMWDP #049
Hand-ground, hand-pulled: "hands down.."

Alslaw
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#5: Post by Alslaw »

Usually there is a date stamp on the element itself identifying the month and year (somewhere near the wattage & voltage stamp). Aside from that, there is usually a date printed on the underside of the base. Finally, you can use the serial number (possibly on the group itself if the machine is old enough), and cross reference with Francesco's site as mentioned above.
LMWDP # 606

Billbell3

#6: Post by Billbell3 »

Thanks to each and all. I think I'm looking at a '76. moving forward.

Billbell3

#7: Post by Billbell3 »

Sorry, '77. Before I reassemble the beast as is, are there any more current changes that I could make now to better the safety and productivity of this machine?

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homeburrero
Team HB

#8: Post by homeburrero »

I think the main thing is to make sure the ground is good and be sure to plug it into a GFCI or RCD protected outlet.

The wiring scheme on the three position lighted switch can be a little confusing. If you neglected to make a sketch or pic of the wiring you can use the one at F. Ceccarelli: http://www.francescoceccarelli.eu/La_Pa ... p74-77.JPG

If the steel ball in the pressure release valve is corroded you may want to replace it with the newer teflon mushroom, but if you do that be sure to get the one with the correct spring (it is weaker and has more coils than a professional or a later model Europiccola safety valve spring).

You can check the resistances of the elements (for a 110V element it would be in the ballpark of 60 ohm for the 200W and 15 ohm for the 800) and make sure no element terminal shows conductivity to the brass base of the element.* Once wired up double check that you do have good continuity between the element base and the grounding prong of your plug before plugging in. Then when you fire it up on a GFCI protected outlet, if the machine has a ground fault problem it will trip.

Be careful not to walk away with it inadvertently on. If you leave it on it will slowly hiss away all the water at which point the element will get red hot and burn out. It has no thermal safety fuse to (sometimes) prevent that.

* If you happen to have an electrician friend with an insulation tester (aka megger), they can tell if and where it has a ground fault with the machine safely uplugged. Sometimes a ground fault is in the element or (more rarely) in the power cord and is not detected by a multimeter. But a problematic machine will immediately trip a working GFCI if the ground wiring is good.
Pat
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