Strietman Countertop Model Coming - Page 8

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donn

#71: Post by donn »

fransg wrote:the relatively light pressure
How so? I mean, is this simply your choice, to pull your shots at a light pressure, or is it as you suggest in some way a characteristic of the machine? If you ground too fine, by mistake, and had to press 4 or 5 times as hard, wouldn't the ES3 accommodate?

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dcupstateNY

#72: Post by dcupstateNY »

Question (again): are the vertical columns solid rods or hollow tubes? Anyone??
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Dave

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Marcelnl
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#73: Post by Marcelnl »

Not sure what the structural difference between thick walled tube and solid rod would be..


But weren't there TWO threads about this new machine? I recall a new thread and the one with the announcement was closed and now suddenly this one is active again and the one called something like ' first impressions' dissapeared? Or is my mind fading fast?
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wouter

#74: Post by wouter »

Hello All,

To answer some of the questions.
The tubes are hollow 2 mm thick stainless steel tubes. The pressure profile is sort of the same as with Olympia Cremina, only the CT1 / ES3 has a slightly longer arm and more distance between the pistonarm rod and the leverarm turning point.
If you grind really to fine and press to hard it has a safety catch (W rubber flips out) This happens only above 10 bars. This to prevent the machine from breaking.

I personally like light roasted coffees, mostly I use Kenian or Ethiopian beans for demonstrations.. These coffees can be especially beautiful with a lighter pressure and a slightly lower temp (89c)
Some years ago, when I used the Caravel often I remembered that I also liked these sort of profiles.
Maybe it has to do with the lighter crema development of light roasted coffee's that you assume that you are applying less pressure..?
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fransg

#75: Post by fransg »

donn wrote:How so? I mean, is this simply your choice, to pull your shots at a light pressure, or is it as you suggest in some way a characteristic of the machine? If you ground too fine, by mistake, and had to press 4 or 5 times as hard, wouldn't the ES3 accommodate?
The relative distance between the "knee" that the lever is bending from and the point where the piston is connected to is larger than in many other levers, like the La Pavoni. So on the La Pavoni the leverage is greater, but any unsteadiness in the hand of the barista is also amplified.

On Strietman's devices you apply less force by the smaller leverage, and since there is no air pocket above the water on the pick, you have a direct feel (no 'bouncing' of the air pocket) for the pressure you apply. If I am correct in this reasoning, then in effect you are enabled to apply a softer, more even pressure profile.

kofi

#76: Post by kofi »

I really like simplicity of the CT1 design. This will be a great machine for somebody who only drinks espressos, like me :D.

I've been putting off getting a more robust espresso machine because the market is really flooded with machines that brew and steam. There are only a few espresso-only machines on the market to choose from. I'm glad Strietmn went back to the basics of making a great espresso: temperature-controlled kettle and lever brew head.

Once you get steaming out of the equation, there are fewer compromises in the design.

donn

#77: Post by donn »

fransg wrote:On Strietman's devices you apply less force by the smaller leverage, and since there is no air pocket above the water on the pick, you have a direct feel (no 'bouncing' of the air pocket) for the pressure you apply.
Interesting, has anyone instrumented that? I mean, it would be interesting to know for example how much handle force to match commercial spring lever pressure (I suppose someone has measured spring lever pressure, though right off hand I wouldn't know where to find that info.) The 10 bar over-pressure failsafe implies you can go pretty high (or maybe it doesn't, if it's 10 ± 5.)