Small footprint levers - Page 3

A haven dedicated to manual espresso machine aficionados.
RyanP

#21: Post by RyanP »

palica wrote:Wouldn't the Argos by Odyssey be a much better choice? From specs and price point of view?
Depends on what you're looking for...

If you just want to pull espresso the Strietman does what it does very well and I'd argue better than any other manual lever on the market. Saturated group, superior piston design, high volume pulls, and 49mm basket makes for a pretty easy routine and stellar espresso. Compared to the other manual machines I've used (Cremina, Pavoni, caravel, robot, flair) the Strietman is the easy choice for me from a pure shot pulling perspective. The only home manual lever that I haven't used is a Flair 58, and I am at least a little curious about the use of a 58mm group with a manual lever, although I think I generally prefer the results from 49mm baskets. If you want milk steaming then that of course rules it out or requires a separate device.

The Argos is compelling, though. Very customizable. If they get the springs dialed in and it proves to have good temp stability then I could see having one for occasional steaming and to have a smaller footprint spring lever.

Iconicred (original poster)

#22: Post by Iconicred (original poster) replying to RyanP »

Thanks for the reply and particularly interesting coming from someone who has used everything! I am a new lever user. I dont pull shots like that ever before. Is the learning curve to get to a decent shot on the CT2 difficult? Or is it like any espresso pulling experience, where you just need to pull and practice and do it more to get better

tompoland

#23: Post by tompoland »

I'm not the guy you asked but ... I've had La Pavoni Pro, a Flair Signature Pro, an Izzo Valexia and a Strietman CT2.

I found the Strietman the easiest to consistently pour a delicious espresso from, closely followed by the Flair.

I still have the Flair, a Portapresso and a Decent DE1XL in addition to the Strietman and if I could only keep one, it would be the Streitman.
Some people drink coffee to wake up, I wake up to drink coffee.

RyanP

#24: Post by RyanP »

Iconicred wrote:Thanks for the reply and particularly interesting coming from someone who has used everything! I am a new lever user. I dont pull shots like that ever before. Is the learning curve to get to a decent shot on the CT2 difficult? Or is it like any espresso pulling experience, where you just need to pull and practice and do it more to get better
If you already know the basics of espresso making then the transition to a Strietman is pretty easy once you get used to the smaller dose and the feel for providing consistent pressure on the lever. If it's your first espresso machine it is another variable to learn, but definitely doable. My dad who has never made espresso before beyond using a nespresso machine has always loved the Strietman when he visits. He finally bought one and a niche grinder. In one face time call I had him pulling good espresso within 30 minutes. He's been happily using it for 5 months now.

erik82

#25: Post by erik82 »

mivanitsky wrote:Possibly, after a few revisions. This is a new machine, with some ambitious goals. If it achieves them, it will be a great value. My current position on Argos is "wait and see."

Streitman CT2 is a known quantity, and is basically the third generation of its design. It is not cheap, but occasionally one finds a used one at a nice price.

If you want to dabble in the manual lever world on the cheap, my current preference is Robot. Cheap and easy, and it can be your travel kit forever. Flair is as good, but it depends on your workflow and basket preference. Flair 58 is direct competition to CT2, but its heater is an assist, not a full heating boiler.
Strietman CT2 will give you the best results and beat a Pavoni or Cremina. It has a saturated group and normal shot volume compared to other levers.