Restoration of a Faema Lambro - Page 9

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homeburrero
Team HB

#81: Post by homeburrero »

Sansibar99 wrote:The tiny holes allow that pressure to go inside the seal lips and press the upper v-seal and the upper part of the lower x-seal to the wall of the cylinder and therefore seal this section from spring compartment and compartment under the piston.
Thanks for confirming and clarifying. Your post clears up confusion about the seal orientation, where the lower seal is an 'X' (some call it 'W') seal that seals both ways and the upper seal is a 'V' seal with the skirt opening facing down. Like the MCAL, but very different than LP Europiccola/Pro home levers where the lower seal skirt faces down and the upper seal skirt faces up.
Pat
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IamOiman (original poster)

#82: Post by IamOiman (original poster) »

My replacement piston has those same holes like my old iron piston (seriously who thought that was a good idea!?). You can barely see them in it after I wire wheeled it. That brownish speckling is not brass (ie it is plated) but rather rust.


I had a go at the lid again after chatting with my metal guy. He said to practice on my little buffer to get a good feel on how much I can push into buffing wheels. I sanded the boiler lid to 3000 grit, and it definitely looks better (the top left corner was done by my metal guy for demonstration purposes on how he sands and buffs). I think I did not take enough surface off during the low grit sanding as I was apprehensive on removing material for a pressurized vessel. This is nonetheless a learning process so I am satisfied in its current state and I'll see if I can also clean up the boiler too when I get it back.

pre buffing


post buffing.


I also got my spring tool. It took 2 months to get here with Deustche Post! Pretty wild shipping times but as I said somewhere their shipping time takes ages, especially when shipping from Frankfurt to the US due to backlogging.
-Ryan
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Clear_dome

#83: Post by Clear_dome »

Edited

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Paul_Pratt

#84: Post by Paul_Pratt »

Glad to see you are making progress. My Ascaso order from last November is still in progress :D so you made the right call to find an alternative supplier.

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IamOiman (original poster)

#85: Post by IamOiman (original poster) »

Paul_Pratt wrote:An alternative supplier.
More like 5!

I've placed orders as TSE, Brooks Espresso, Chisko, SproParts, and Avola coffee systems. There is a French website that sells parts for just about distributor pricing but their layout was very confusing and not easy to navigate, therefore I just price matched at a few of my other places. An example: https://www.eevad.com/fr/support-roulem ... 06295.html
-Ryan
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EyalR

#86: Post by EyalR »

I LOVE this thread!

I just bought my (dream) lambro and will soon start the restoration.

So Excited !

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IamOiman (original poster)

#87: Post by IamOiman (original poster) »

Powdercoating bits are finally back. It's just the chrome bits that remain to be returned.

I picked RAL 3002 with some texture for the panels and a grey for the frame and water level. I got the boiler back as well which I will post about when I clean it up. The side t-fitting would simply not yield so it will remain on the boiler with its original seals. If it can survive the torch it probably should remain to prevent damage to the boiler.

Hopefully the frame will not need much sanding to fit the lower skirt from the added thickness, but the powdercoat can be sanded down a bit if necessary.


-Ryan
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IamOiman (original poster)

#88: Post by IamOiman (original poster) »

Reassembly began today! The first thing to go on are the four original aluminum feet. I screwed them on as far as I could by hand and finished it with a strap wrench (there was far less resistance compared to when I took them off). I went out to Ace Hardware to get some rubber feet. I selected the 1" ID ones used for protecting table legs so I could cut down the feet to size as I saw appropriate.




I also have a cord grip to prevent the power cable from being tugged accidentally out of the toggle switch I intend to install. The washer is there because the hex on the cord grip is ever so slightly smaller than the hole it rests against and this was the biggest one I could buy that would fit 14-3 AWG wiring. It is 3/4" NPT for the thread.


The lower skirt was next. This time the powdercoat did not prevent the skirt from fitting due to added material fortunately, so it was a simple process of adding the two rivets that secure the skirt to the frame. I also checked that the water fill and drain box threads would fit through their respective holes in the skirt.



A few threads in the frame needed some cleanup with a tap, particularly the M5 holes that hold the water level bracket. It was nice to have it one hand so I would not accidentally crossthread the hole when just trying to use the original M5 screws.



Going over to the panels, I purchased M4 x 10mm slotted brass studs that allow me to screw them into their holes pretty easily. If I were to redo it I would get ever so slightly 12mm or 14mm studs next time just in case, but these 10mm ones should work fine. Fourteen of them were placed, and I accidentally snapped on after applying too much force, but that is why I have extras just in case for stuff like that.




Once the studs are installed I keep one panel on its side and place the three rear panel pieces into their studs. I hand tight the nuts then place the assembly upright and install the little nuts on the other panel. Only when I see the panels are snugly fit and adjusted do I fully tighten the nuts, though they do not get tightened too much since they are made of brass. I tried cleaning up the yellow piece as best I could and so far it appears to look pretty decent even compared to the other cleaned up/powdercoated pieces. Note the new Lambro logo and the original emblem as well.




Next steps involve the boiler, so once I get the polishing pics done I will continue with assembly and posting.
-Ryan
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EddyQ

#89: Post by EddyQ »

Looks amazing Ryan! I'm amazed you remember where so many parts all go after months of waiting.
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IamOiman (original poster)

#90: Post by IamOiman (original poster) »

I have the boiler cleaned up to a point where I am personally satisfied with it, and will thus go over how I got to this point.

The first thing that needed to be done was sand the boiler. I did this using the little homemade square sanders made by my metal guy from a 2x90 sanding belt (each belt makes 2 of them). He showed me how to make them and then how to mount them to a chuck that can be adapted to fit an arbor. For practice purposes I did the sanding on one of his motors but I have the capability to do it on my little Omega grinder. I just did 320 grit for reference.



He says the higher the grit the material is sanded to the easier it accepts a polish from the buffing wheels. 600 grit is a good starting point to begin buffing but if you are aggressive enough you can do it on 320 (or even less for him, I saw him bring matte stainless steel to near mirror in about 20 seconds going from 80 grit to 220 grit on his belt sanders then to his sisal wheel). You can also go to higher grits for an easier time with the buffing stage.

I got my hands on some new spiral wheels and loose cotton wheels. They are 6" in diameter and I can stack two of them together for polishing large surfaces and use one for polishing smaller areas. The spiral wheels use brown tripoli and the loose cotton wheels use white tripoli.

Normally when receiving new wheels you would need to take a wheel rake to break the wheels in. This removes loose material/fibers that may impede in polishing, and any long strands that stick out can be cut with scissors to ensure a constant surface. You can see these loose strands in the following two photos. I had to also purchase new 3/4"-10 nuts and a pair of Baldor wheel flanges, which for 3/4" arbor is OEM part HA6098 (also shown in the photo)



Polishing involves holding the piece in a steady position that prevents it from being knocked or shifted around by the wheel. I found (and with advice from my grandfather and metal guy) that leaning it against the front upper thigh or lower stomach allows me to pivot the piece against the wheel fairly well. Of course you need to avoid pieces that can be hit by the wheels (like the flange or boiler fittings) and potentially move the piece or even launch it. It takes practice and I myself am still learning. Don't forget the filter mask and safety goggles as I doubt breathing these small particles is good for my health and I like having eyes.




The results, note the green stuff at the bottom is leftover flux from a small weld I needed to do. I just wanted the boiler to be cleaned up and was not going for mirror. The one way copper piece that holds the o-ring is flipped from its proper position in the pic which I fixed after.




Mounting the boiler involves an M8 bolt. It will need to be adjusted once I get all the chromed pieces back as it can pivot around this bolt. For now I just added the safety valve and vacuum valve. I used 3/8" BSP teflon gaskets which I hope I tightened on enough, and I also needed to file the end of the adaptor a little so it would screw in without bumping against the thermosyphon tube. The little brass screw needed a small silicone o-ring. The adaptor can be tightened with a 27mm wrench.




Finally I got the water inlet together. Note the one way valve is now integrated with the inlet unlike the President. I put some Dow 111 for the pivoted pin that toggles the water inlet. From here I really do not want to do too much until I have the chrome pieces back.

-Ryan
Using a spice grinder violates the Geneva Convention
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