Profitec Pro 800 Seal Replacement

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rsc
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#1: Post by rsc »

I've had my Profitec Pro 800 machine for about 8 months now and pull and average of 8 shots per day. I am wondering how one knows when the piston seals should be serviced (lubed) or replaced? Is it smart to be proactive and just replace them annually? I am not noticing and loss/drop in pressure or leakage anywhere. Thanks and apologies if this a FAQ.

Oskuk
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#2: Post by Oskuk »

If there is originally black seals, they become hard with time, like portafilter seals too.
But if no worries -no worries. But it is good habit to have spares in hand, and I recommend silicone ones.
Even thou I have had mystery-problems with mine, took many years to at last realise that my seals were bigger than blackies, and lowest one prevented water to come in the chamber. But that aside, right ones are good, flexible and long lasting.
If you check these once a year, that sure is not too often.

PPapa
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#3: Post by PPapa »

I would typically reassemble the group every six months, clean and regrease with Loxeal No4. 4-6 shots daily, and on for 4-8hrs.

The silicone seals are the worst, they seemed to crack if not greased regularly. They're much easier to install but I only had bad experience with them (despite liking it as shower screen seal). The rubber ones should last years.

The new no-grease Londinium seals are buttery smooth and should require less servicing as they do not need any grease. Would definitely recommend as an upgrade, if you can get hold of them (I assume they'll fit just fine...).
https://londiniumespresso.com/store/ind ... duct_id=69

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baldheadracing
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#4: Post by baldheadracing »

rsc wrote:I've had my Profitec Pro 800 machine for about 8 months now and pull and average of 8 shots per day. I am wondering how one knows when the piston seals should be serviced (lubed) or replaced? Is it smart to be proactive and just replace them annually? I am not noticing and loss/drop in pressure or leakage anywhere. Thanks and apologies if this a FAQ.
I would have lubed seals a couple months ago.

The catch with these groups is that you can't see or easily notice the most common leak/corrosion point, which leakage above a worn/cracked upper piston seal. You have to pull the piston and inspect.

With piston seals I count how many times the machine is regularly turned on (and warmed up). For commercial spring lever groups, I lube about every hundred or so times. For example, if I turn the machine on once a day, then I am lubing the seals every three-four months; twice a day, every two-three months; but always at least once every couple of years.
-"Good quality brings happiness as you use it" - Nobuho Miya, Kamasada

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pizzaman383
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#5: Post by pizzaman383 »

baldheadracing wrote: The catch with these groups is that you can't see or easily notice the most common leak/corrosion point, which leakage above a worn/cracked upper piston seal. You have to pull the piston and inspect.
Why do you say that this is the most common leak point? My experience with the same group used on the pro800 is that the bottom seal dries out, wears, cracks and/or degrades much faster than the top seal. I found that if I inspect the top seal each time I replaced the bottom seal I found it to rarely need replacing.
Curtis
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“Taste every shot before adding milk!”

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baldheadracing
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#6: Post by baldheadracing replying to pizzaman383 »

Most common leak point that causes damage because the leak isn't noticed - unless the group is regularly serviced.
-"Good quality brings happiness as you use it" - Nobuho Miya, Kamasada

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JohnB.
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#7: Post by JohnB. »

baldheadracing wrote:The catch with these groups is that you can't see or easily notice the most common leak/corrosion point, which leakage above a worn/cracked upper piston seal. You have to pull the piston and inspect.
When the upper seal on the 3 seal piston gets worn you will see water dripping out where the top and bottom group sections come together. With Bosco's 4 seal piston this isn't an issue.
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