Owner experience with the Strietman CT1 - Page 27

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erik82

#261: Post by erik82 »

SAB wrote:I'm normally just leaving it on for a few minutes in the morning, and I did have it on longer for a few days, so I may need to dial down the temp if I'm going to leave it on longer than usual.
This assumption is wrong. I had the same thing happen to me a while ago when I set the temperature too high while adjusting the thermostat. I talked it over a couple of times with Wouter.

The problem isn't in leaving it on for a long time but in the first cycle of heating up from a cold state. It kind of overshoots in the first cycle of heating because it needs to warm everything up and then the thermal protection kicks in. If you leave it too high it will kick in every time in the first heating cycle and when you reset it and turn it on again while still warm it can stay on whole day without a problem.

RockyIII
Supporter ♡

#262: Post by RockyIII »

I have some questions about the CT1.

What kind of wood is used for the lever, portafilter holder, and tamper handles, and what sort of finish is on it if any?

What tamping pressure do people use? I have seen "light" mentioned regarding tamping. Does that mean nothing more than leveling with fingertip pressure, or can you state an actual value to use such as 5 or 10 pounds?

Do people really put automotive grease on these machines to keep the brass and copper from tarnishing? It seems like that might create an objectionable odor when heated and also be unhealthy if it happens to get inside the open boiler. Does anybody have a recommendation of a specific type and brand of wax or grease that they have found works well? If you don't put anything on it, will it tarnish immediately from the heat?

Rocky

RockyIII
Supporter ♡

#263: Post by RockyIII »

Oh, I just saw in another CT1 thread that Super Lube Synthetic Grease is recommended, and it is acid free and food grade.

Has anybody found anything that works better? How about some kind of wax that dries harder than grease?

Rocky

erik82

#264: Post by erik82 »

I just use ball bearing grease on the outside. Works perfect and doesn't give a smelle after the first hour.

RyanP

#265: Post by RyanP »

Not sure where to post this, but it seems relevant to using the CT1. I have a love/hate relationship with a very light roast natural Ethiopian Kilenso from Slate roasters here in Seattle. The aroma it gives off, especially when freshly ground, is very enticing, almost intoxicating. Very fruity, jammy. They say strawberries and blueberries on the bag, and that seems right to me. For me, it has been a tough bean to dial in. It can easily pull overly acidic and bright. Sometimes the fruits are just hinted at in the cup, and the flavor just comes off as dull. But, when I get it right it is an absolutely fantastic shot of espresso, and offers everything it promises on the nose. I decided yesterday when I was passing by Slate to give it another go. I've pulled a few very good shots and think I have found a repeatable method on the CT1 for pulling the best out of this bean.

16.8g in the basket. I raise the lever at 201-202F (and turn the machine off). Instead of holding the lever up for 30 seconds like I usually do, after 15 secs of passive preinfusion, I gently lower the lever, probably in the 1-2 bar pressure range. I do this for about 10-15 seconds until I see full beading on the bottom of the basket and the beginning of dripping. I then ramp up to full pressure followed by a steady decline in pressure. The flow is moderate-slow, but not requiring excessive force on the lever. I pull the cup at around 35g. The result is sweet, very fruit forward, gentle integrated acidity, and a creamy mouthfeel.

I know this type of pressure profiling is nothing new to lever users, but I hadn't given it a shot yet with some of the more difficult light roasts. Very promising so far!

CwD

#266: Post by CwD »

RockyIII wrote:I have some questions about the CT1.

What tamping pressure do people use? I have seen "light" mentioned regarding tamping. Does that mean nothing more than leveling with fingertip pressure, or can you state an actual value to use such as 5 or 10 pounds?
I tamp mine until the puck won't compress any further. Works well for me. Very repeatable.

mfortin

#267: Post by mfortin » replying to CwD »

I am doing the same.

mfortin

#268: Post by mfortin »

RyanP wrote:Not sure where to post this, but it seems relevant to using the CT1. I have a love/hate relationship with a very light roast natural Ethiopian Kilenso from Slate roasters here in Seattle. The aroma it gives off, especially when freshly ground, is very enticing, almost intoxicating. Very fruity, jammy. They say strawberries and blueberries on the bag, and that seems right to me. For me, it has been a tough bean to dial in. It can easily pull overly acidic and bright. Sometimes the fruits are just hinted at in the cup, and the flavor just comes off as dull. But, when I get it right it is an absolutely fantastic shot of espresso, and offers everything it promises on the nose. I decided yesterday when I was passing by Slate to give it another go. I've pulled a few very good shots and think I have found a repeatable method on the CT1 for pulling the best out of this bean.

16.8g in the basket. I raise the lever at 201-202F (and turn the machine off). Instead of holding the lever up for 30 seconds like I usually do, after 15 secs of passive preinfusion, I gently lower the lever, probably in the 1-2 bar pressure range. I do this for about 10-15 seconds until I see full beading on the bottom of the basket and the beginning of dripping. I then ramp up to full pressure followed by a steady decline in pressure. The flow is moderate-slow, but not requiring excessive force on the lever. I pull the cup at around 35g. The result is sweet, very fruit forward, gentle integrated acidity, and a creamy mouthfeel.

I know this type of pressure profiling is nothing new to lever users, but I hadn't given it a shot yet with some of the more difficult light roasts. Very promising so far!
Try to use a paper drip coffee filter (1,75 inch diameter) in your filter basket and taste the result (do not forget to wet the paper filter before you add coffee). You will probably have to grind finer and get a better extraction.

RyanP

#269: Post by RyanP » replying to mfortin »

I'd have to search for it, but I seem to remember reading about that idea in an old thread and the conclusion more-or-less being that nobody who was trying it could taste a difference, and seems like it's not used much today? Am I wrong about that? I'm game to try it out for myself, though like i mentioned, getting very good results from the current method.

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aecletec

#270: Post by aecletec »

I just found it a tiny bit of a nuisance - but it seemed to make it easier to taste nuance at the expense of texture.