Original Retail Pricing of Vintage Espresso Machines

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spiffy

#1: Post by spiffy »

An interesting topic evolved out of the Streitman Countertop thread on the original retail pricing of various vintage machines, and I thought it'd be useful to collect the information in one place and see if we can continue the discussion. The username links will take you to the original posts, including scans of brochures and catalogues.

Here's what we have so far (prices in 2015 US Dollars unless otherwise noted):


Faemina: $950 - $1000 (marcelnl conversion by pootoogoo)
Microcimbali: $810 (Francesco Ceccarelli via pootoogoo)
Cremina: $650 (espressoperson)
La Peppina: $700 in 1972 (espressme via bluecold) or $465 (Francesco Ceccarelli via pootoogoo)
Caravel: $370 - $480 (Francesco Ceccarelli via pootoogoo)
Faema baby: $90 (Francesco Ceccarelli via pootoogoo)

E: Here's the updated list using Sebastian's Method 2, where available, with the year the price is from (the prices are still in roughly 2015 USD)
  • Sama Lusso: $1000 (1976)
    Faemina: $950 - $1000
    Sama Export: $690 (1976)
    Microcimbali: $645 (1957) $610 (1961) $565 (1976)
    Cremina: $650 (1985)
    Gilda: $525 (1953)
    Quick Mill Omre (?): $480 (1971)
    Peppina: $350 (1961) $355 (1976)
    Europiccola: $350 (1971)
    Caravel: $330 (1974)
    Faema baby: $66 (1961)

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pootoogoo

#2: Post by pootoogoo »

Thanks spiffy, I was about to create the thread as recommended by TomC.

Here is the method I used:
I first converted the Lira to GBP using the year average from the Historical exchange rates tool, then actualized the GBP using the Historical Price converter (2013 rate)... then convert the GPB to USD using again the Historical exchange rates (2013 year average: 1 GBP = 1.564 USD).
(Method 1)

EDIT - Method 2: I realized that there is a more direct way to do it on the Historical exchange rates tool by correcting the Italian price for inflation then convert it to USD. This seems more accurate and gives systematically lower prices than method 1.

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pootoogoo

#3: Post by pootoogoo »

Here are the documents relative to some of the prices presented above:


[1961 catalog from Francesco Ceccarelli, with his kind authorization]

Method 1:
25800 Lira (1961) for a Peppina -> 465 USD (2013)
45000 Lira (1961) for a Microcimbali -> 810 USD (2013)
4900 Lira (1961) for Faema baby -> 90 USD (2013)

Method 2:
25800 Lira (1961) for a Peppina -> 350 USD (2015)
45000 Lira (1961) for a Microcimbali -> 610 USD (2015)
4900 Lira (1961) for Faema baby -> 66 USD (2015)

What about the Caravel cost back in the 70s ?
I may have the answer, thanks to Francesco again: he sent me a price without a date. The brochure says between 46900 and 35900 Lira.


[Image from Francesco Ceccarelli, with his kind authorization]

But if you look carefully at the strike-out price below it reads 38900 and 28900... this means 20% inflation (that certainly happened over one year to be modified on the same brochure). Such inflation rate did not happen before 1974 in Italy (24.5%)... I'm pretty sure that's the brochure date: it also correspond to the design (it's this or 1976 where Italy suffered 20.6% inflation).

Method 1:
This gives the listed prices to be between 370 and 480 actualized USD (for Caravel members club, subscribing to coffee delivery at home, and listed price respectively). Referring to 1976 will bring the price even lower (between 265 and 345 USD).

Method 2:
46900 Lira (1974) for a Caravel -> 330 USD (2015)
35900 Lira (1974) for a Caravel -> 255 USD (2015)

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crazy4espresso

#4: Post by crazy4espresso »

$650 for a Cremina?
Have they done anything radically different with the new Cremina's, i.e, is the frame made of gold? It would cost me over $4500 CAD to purchase a new one. I am a temporary custodian of a 1983 model, and looking at it, while being a solid little machine, there is nothing about it that justifies the absurd current costs of buying new.
"I would rather suffer with coffee than be senseless." — Napoleon Bonaparte
LMWDP #427

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pootoogoo

#5: Post by pootoogoo »


[1957 catalog from Francesco Ceccarelli]

Method 1:
45000 Lira (1957) for a Microcimbali -> 850 USD (2013)

Method 2:
45000 Lira (1957) for a Microcimbali -> 645 USD (2015)

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pootoogoo

#6: Post by pootoogoo »


[1976 catalog from Francesco Ceccarelli]

Method 1:
69000 Lira (1976) for a Peppina -> 545 USD (2013)
110000 Lira (1976) for a Microcimbali -> 870 USD (2013)
135000 Lira (1976) for a Sama export -> 1066 USD (2013)
195000 Lira (1976) for a Sama lusso -> 1540 USD (2013)

Method 2:
69000 Lira (1976) for a Peppina -> 355 USD (2015)
110000 Lira (1976) for a Microcimbali -> 565 USD (2015)
135000 Lira (1976) for a Sama export -> 690 USD (2015)
195000 Lira (1976) for a Sama lusso -> 1000 USD (2015)

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pootoogoo

#7: Post by pootoogoo »


[1971 catalog from Francesco Ceccarelli]

Method 1:
39000 Lira (1971) for an Europiccola -> 525 USD (2013)
53200 Lira (1971) for an Quick Mill -> 715 USD (2013)

Method 2:
39000 Lira (1971) for an Europiccola -> 350 USD (2015)
53200 Lira (1971) for an Quick Mill -> 480 USD (2015)

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pootoogoo

#8: Post by pootoogoo »


[1953 catalog from Francesco Ceccarelli]

Method 1:
35000 Lira (1953) for a Gilda -> 750 USD (2013)

Method 2:
35000 Lira (1955) for a Gilda -> 525 USD (2015)

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beer&mathematics

#9: Post by beer&mathematics »

This thread is awesome!
LMWDP #431

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spiffy (original poster)

#10: Post by spiffy (original poster) »

Thanks for the updates Sebastian - I've updated the OP with the new prices.

It seems like spring pistons occupied the upper end of the market (with the Peppina as the exception). I'm not sure how much the market for machines changed between the 70s and 80s, but it seems like even back then the Cremina would be considered expensive when compared to other direct levers. When compared to prices on the used market today, it appears that the direct levers have held their value extremely well, whereas the spring levers have depreciated roughly 50%)

According to the OE video I watched on the QM Omre (?), that was the thermoblock machine that effectively killed the home lever market, and it's interesting that it's priced between the spring piston and direct lever machines.