La Pavoni Professional burnt terminal cover and pressure gauge pointer off set

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IvyWrigl3y

#1: Post by IvyWrigl3y »

:cry: Good day!
I was adjusting the pressurestat on my 2019 Professional and noticed a burnt terminal cover (see photo) on a post for the heating element. The machine seems to work fine. Is this a concern? When I purchased the machine I did have to rest the thermostat on the S/S heating element. Perhaps this burn happened when it was tripped before I owned it (maybe why the owner thought it was broken)?

Also, the pointer on the face of the pressure gauge starts several values high (see photo). However, does this even affect the true reading of the pressure?



Nunas
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#2: Post by Nunas »

IvyWrigl3y wrote:<snip> on my 2019 Professional and noticed a burnt terminal cover (see photo) on a post for the heating element. The machine seems to work fine. Is this a concern?
Yes, it is a concern. The photo you posted shows a classical case of a poor joint. Sometimes the connectors become loose, and sometimes it is the crimp between the connector and the wire. Either way, it will never self-heal, and will likely get worse. In the worst case, the plastic can burn, and the wire may break. The correct fix is to cut the wire back until you see clean copper and crimp on a new, high-quality connector. Also, clean up the male connector on the element to remove any corrosion or annealing.
Also, the pointer on the face of the pressure gauge starts several values high (see photo) . However, does this even affect the true reading of the pressure?
This is a common fault. Sadly, the quality of the gauges used on most of our equipment isn't the best. Thus, there's usually no way to re-zero the needle. On better gauges, usually liquid filled, there is an adjustment screw or a small rubber plug. Have a look at your gauge to see if there's an external adjustment (probably not). If not, then you'll have to put up with it or buy a new gauge. Meanwhile, you can use the gauge, mentally compensating for the error.

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lassepavoni

#3: Post by lassepavoni »

Nunas wrote:The correct fix is to cut the wire back until you see clean copper and crimp on a new, high-quality connector. Also, clean up the male connector on the element to remove any corrosion or annealing.
You'd need the proper crimp tool and know your way around it, though. Better to have it made by a professional, or you may end up with the same problem as before (or even worse).

That said, crimping on connectors is not rocket science, but there's still plenty to do wrong. On the other hand it won't cost you an arm and a leg to have it made by a local repair shop.
Regards,
Lasse

Nunas
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#4: Post by Nunas »

Good point, I should have said that you need a ratchet crimper, not the kind that look like flattened pliers, that one often finds in department store crimping kits. There are lots of posts here on H-B describing the process in some detail. If in doubt and you intend to DIY, do a search.

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mrgnomer

#5: Post by mrgnomer »

I'm no expert but have had experience with shorted out heating elements. It can happen over time or if the machine was turned on with the boiler empty and the element dry fired. I'd consider checking the continuity of the element if you find a burnt connection.

When the element goes either it won't turn off or turn on when plugged in. The won't turn off happened to me. The water heats up when the machine is plugged in even when it's switched off. Switch it on and the heating gets faster, the pressure goes past the pressurestat setting and builds until the safety valve pops. One way to stop the runaway pressure is to unplug the machine and bleed pressure out through the steam valve.
Kirk
LMWDP #116
professionals do it for the pay, amateurs do it for the love

IvyWrigl3y (original poster)

#6: Post by IvyWrigl3y (original poster) »

Thank you all!! I will take it to a trusted tech to do the work as you have advised. I realize that is an inexpensive repair but could be a VERY EXPENSIVE mistake if I don't!! I have ceased using it for the interim.
Also, I can live with the mis-calibration on the gauge since it is absolutely impossible to pull the cover. Thank you all again for your reply.