La Pavoni new vs old pressurestat - Page 2

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Belbo (original poster)

#11: Post by Belbo (original poster) »

drgary wrote:I think you can make the unadjustable ones adjustable by breaking the seal of the paint they use to hold them in place. It's been awhile since I've done that, so please check this.
Thanks Garry! I have read the relevant threads and considering it, just afraid I might break it!

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drgary
Team HB

#12: Post by drgary »

You will just break a paint seal. The pressurestat will still work. And you were thinking of replacing it anyway.
Gary
LMWDP#308

What I WOULD do for a good cup of coffee!

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Kaffee Bitte

#13: Post by Kaffee Bitte »

Actually it's set at 1.1 bar, almost always but about once a week or so it decides to climb higher. At 1.1 it's great for steam but shoots the group past temps easily. If it were my Stradivari I think that would be perfect as the group doesn't climb as quick nor overshoot as easily.

I thought about trying to break the seal and adjust it but I am not the most mechanically inclined and with my luck I would break it and have to buy a new one anyway.
Lynn G.
LMWDP # 110
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drgary
Team HB

#14: Post by drgary »

Kaffee Bitte wrote:I thought about trying to break the seal and adjust it but I am not the most mechanically inclined and with my luck I would break it and have to buy a new one anyway.
Lynn: If you decide to replace it because of the overheating tendency, might as well give it a try. I wasn't mechanically inclined either until I started trying things like this.
Gary
LMWDP#308

What I WOULD do for a good cup of coffee!

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homeburrero
Team HB

#15: Post by homeburrero »

I think in Lynn's case it's either some scale clogging or a sticky mechanism causing the unpredictable switching. Adjusting alone will likely not fix it, so good idea to go ahead and buy a new one right away. My recommendation would be Stefano's replacement adjustable pStat. I just did that for a friend's machine and it was a very straightforward job.

Look in the boiler for scale, and if there is visible scale, descale first.

Then unplug the machine and use two wrenches (17mm or adjustable crescent) to remove the old pStat at the pStat fitting.

When the pstat is removed, get a flexible wire and make sure that there is no scale in that pipe. You can flush it a little with the machine in a sink or tub, avoid getting any water on the electricals. If you do be sure all wires, contacts, and switches are nice and dry before you plug it in.

To adjust it I'd recommend this sequence. With the base still off, water level 3/4 full
1. Plug in and watch it come up to full pressure.
2. Release some steam and watch it come back up 2 or 3 times. Note the min and max pressure, tapping on the gauge sometimes helps. 0.8 bar max is often recommended but many people choose to set it lower or higher. Higher gives you more steam but also more prone to overheating. If you are at high elevation you can go a little higher (I go 1 bar at 5000 ft altitude.)
3. If it needs adjustment, unplug!, let off some steam, let it cool a little, use hotpads or oven mitts to tilt the machine over.
4. To decrease the max pressure, turn the toothed plastic wheel counterclockwise (when facing the top, wired part of the pressurestat. Clockwise to increase pressure. 1/4 to 1/2 revolution should make a noticeable change.
5. Upright and plug it in, switch on, and watch it come up to max pressure. Release some steam and note the pressure when it switches on, then off. You won't hear a click but If the room is very quiet you can hear faint bubbling when it switches on. If you have a Europiccola you'll see the green light come on. If a Stradivari you'll see the 'ready' light go off.
6. Unplug and repeat steps 4 and 5 if necessary. Otherwise replace the base and you're done.
Pat
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