La Pavoni Europiccola vintage

A haven dedicated to manual espresso machine aficionados.
Tyler200
Posts: 3
Joined: Sep 09, 2017, 10:46 am

Postby Tyler200 » Sep 09, 2017, 7:58 pm

Hello everyone! New to this form and new to Espresso!

The past week I've been looking at getting my first espresso machine checking out reviews one best budget machines and learning as much as I can.

Today I came across this vintage Europiccola and figured it was worth picking up. Found out that some hold value question is how much? I still plan on buying a machine but wondering what the best route would be to go with this..maybe if it is worth something put it toward a machine...

I've seen some people rebuild these or replace the seals
I plugged it in and the heater works past that I don't know what I'm doing but it started steaming... overall looks to be in great condition...any help on what to do with this would be greatly appreciated thanks!

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Zombeezy
Posts: 1
Joined: Sep 09, 2017, 10:17 am

Postby Zombeezy » Sep 13, 2017, 10:06 am

I'm not certain this is a great first way to start out. If you already have one now, I guess that is a different story.

I had one back in the early 80's, and I was never satisfied with the results. Of course, back then I didn't have a very good grinder, and little on what makes good espresso was available outside of a few books on coffee and espresso, and a couple of specialty magazines.

Unfortunately, I recently tossed out all my documentation related to it. I recall that my biggest fear was that some day I was going to pulling (and at times pushing down) so hard on that lever that it was going to break off from the tank and blow up, lol. In order to get any crema at all, it was a huge effort. And bitter. Now I realize that perhaps I might have been able to do better had I had a better grinder.

Online you certainly can find youtube tutorials and also here in these forums - just saw one at La Pavoni Europiccola instructions... for newbies

It is a very attractive machine, so it looks great to have in the kitchen. Being new to this forum, I haven't lurked enough to see if others have posted on their success and/or happiness with this vintage machine. It certainly is simple in its simplicity. Nor have I lurked about enough to know what the best option for good espresso at the lowest cost in these times. After the La Pavoni, I moved onto to $1200 Bezzera and $300 grinder (in the mid-80's) that I was never truly happy with, then spent years buying Starbucks triple-shot lattes and then various low-end home systems and grinders, ending with buying a Nespresso Lattissima+ for my wife. I'm happy enough with the automated espresso machine in my hotel lobby (fresh beans!) so I can take the slow path to getting my next machine and grinder, which looks to be the wildly indulging Linea Mini and Kafatek Monolith :)

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redbone
Posts: 1558
Joined: Sep 12, 2012, 9:19 am

Postby redbone » Sep 13, 2017, 10:52 am

This is a recent related post and may also aid you. La Pavoni Europiccola User Recipes

These machines are capable of making great espresso.
The issue being that it generally comes with an initial learning curve and does require a good grinder, and non-chlorinated water for starters.
Welcome the vintage LPE family. You've come to the right place with tons of reference information.
ON A QUEST FOR BETTER ESPRESSO


Rob
LMWDP #549

Tonefish
Posts: 187
Joined: Jun 26, 2017, 5:31 pm

Postby Tonefish » Sep 13, 2017, 12:07 pm

Enjoy your new espresso adventure. The LPE can make great espresso!

This thread would be more appropriate in the "Levers" section. Perhaps a moderator will move it for you. Cheers!
LMWDP #581 .......... May your roasts, grinds, and pulls be the best!

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grog
Posts: 1127
Joined: Mar 09, 2012, 2:45 pm

Postby grog » Sep 13, 2017, 12:43 pm

With the 220v element, it will take longer to come to temp than with a 110v (unless you happen to have a 220v outlet to use it with).

But yes, these machines make great espresso after you learn their quirks. My first lever was a 1980 Europiccola and while it took me a few months to really start getting consistently great shots, many others have reported a shorter learning curve. Spend some time with the search function on this forum and you will find a wealth of information on the Europiccola.

Bottom line, manual levers aren't for everyone - but you will discover pretty quickly if they are for you.
LMWDP #514

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homeburrero
Team HB
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Joined: Jun 14, 2011, 10:54 pm

Postby homeburrero » Sep 13, 2017, 1:54 pm

I see in the pics that this machine is 220V with a NEMA 6-15 plug, which will require either a 220V NEMA 6-15 or NEMA 6-20 receptacle. If you were to change the plug or use a plug-adapter and use it on 110V nothing bad would happen to the machine, but it would heat very very slowly and the pressure would drop too low when trying to froth a pitcher of milk. (At 110V, you'd get 1/4th the power you want - it would pull only 200 watts on high, and 50 watts on low.)

If you have a 220V outlet in your kitchen you're good-to-go. You could have an electrician put one in, but that could be costly. Otherwise you could use it with a step-up transformer or quality (2000 watt or more) autotransformer. If you have plans of moving abroad where household voltage is 220V then this would be a good option.

If you want to use it here on 110V without a bulky transformer your option would be to change the power cord/plug and the heating element over to 110V, which is a little involved.
Pat
nínádiishʼnahgo gohwééh náshdlį́į́h

Tyler200
Posts: 3
Joined: Sep 09, 2017, 10:46 am

Postby Tyler200 » Sep 14, 2017, 6:01 pm

Thanks for all the replys and feedback! I've since purchased a Breville barista 870xl....from what I've read I think this is a good started for me as I have yet to have hundreds of espresso drinks I'm not too set a true taste...i look forward to playing around with the la pavoni and getting to learn how to use a lever style

Tyler200
Posts: 3
Joined: Sep 09, 2017, 10:46 am

Postby Tyler200 » Sep 14, 2017, 6:03 pm

I do have 220 in my garage that's where I tested it out. I could run 220 If I wanted to in my kitchen but I'll probably opt for the newer machine

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redbone
Posts: 1558
Joined: Sep 12, 2012, 9:19 am

Postby redbone » Sep 14, 2017, 6:16 pm

You can always send the 220v for a 110c swap to Hungary or buy a new 120v.
ON A QUEST FOR BETTER ESPRESSO


Rob
LMWDP #549

slipchuck
Posts: 164
Joined: Apr 12, 2017, 11:36 am

Postby slipchuck » Sep 14, 2017, 6:46 pm

Tyler200 wrote:Thanks for all the replys and feedback! I've since purchased a Breville barista 870xl....from what I've read I think this is a good started for me as I have yet to have hundreds of espresso drinks I'm not too set a true taste...i look forward to playing around with the la pavoni and getting to learn how to use a lever style

I have the batista express as well. Great learning machine!

Randy

 
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