La Pavoni Europiccola gen2 no pressurestat - adjusting pressure?

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bobsy
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#1: Post by bobsy »

I just installed a boiler gauge on my '78 gen2 EP (no pressurestat nor thermostat) with switches I and II.

When I turn on the machine at aII, pressure never goes beyond 0.9 (safety valve hisses like crazy - as it should), and when I flip it back to I, it stays around 0.75 range.

Is this considered normal or should I be doing something to slightly adjust the pressure (if so - how?) to be close to 1.0 when I'm on switch I while pulling my shot?

Thanks!

Utking
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#2: Post by Utking »

Working as intended! Enjoy your machine :)

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homeburrero
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#3: Post by homeburrero »

I'm with Utking - - idling at .75 bar before pulling a shot is a good place to be on a Gen 2. For steaming you can flip it to II and let it come up a little higher before opening the wand.

You should set it to II when you first turn on the machine so that it heats up quickly, then as soon as it is hissing fully flip it down to I and give it some half pumps to help heat the group head. Many of us use a temperature strip (or a themocouple rig) on the group to help know when the group is at an optimal temp for pulling a shot.
Pat
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bobsy (original poster)
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#4: Post by bobsy (original poster) »

Yep I recently got the strips and was mind blown I have been pulling shots way too soon around 65c. I didn't really feel it since I always make lattes, but I notice it's better when pulling at the right temperature.

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ei8htohms
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#5: Post by ei8htohms »

I've only just begun my own temperature experiments, but Bong Juachon did a series of them some time ago with these results (for correlating grouphead temperature to brew temperature):



He was using a K type probe, mounted at 180°, mid-bell, and mentioned that another temp probe he tried read about 3°C lower. On the Gen 3 model he tested, it had a plastic piston sleeve. He said the boiler pressure was 0.9 bar.

In my preliminary experiments, I've found temp strips to have considerable lag and generally to read about 6°C lower than a K type probe. I'll be testing for actual brew/puck temperature in the near future, but on my machine with a stainless steel piston sleeve and a bong isolator (hence my feeling that specific testing is required).
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homeburrero
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#6: Post by homeburrero »

ei8htohms wrote:In my preliminary experiments, I've found temp strips to have considerable lag and generally to read about 6°C lower than a K type probe.
Interesting. I don't think others have seen this lag or discrepancy. Here's a good example: How accurate are temperature strips: time lapse video

Temp strips are inadequate for doing documented temperature studies, but once you get used to them I think they can do a fine job of letting you know if your group might be too cool or too hot to start a pull. You don't need to know the actual group temperature -- you just need to learn (by experience and taste) which colors you like to see on your strip when starting a pull. You do need good lighting to read them, and after a year or two need to replace them with a new strip.
Pat
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ei8htohms
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#7: Post by ei8htohms »

homeburrero wrote:Interesting. I don't think others have seen this lag or discrepancy. Here's a good example: How accurate are temperature strips: time lapse video
Interesting. I can imagine there may be significant differences between different kinds of temperature strips, but this makes me want to do something similar on film to make sure the lag of recording the results is not contributing overly to any perceived lag. Will report back...
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ei8htohms
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#8: Post by ei8htohms »

homeburrero wrote:Interesting. I don't think others have seen this lag or discrepancy. Here's a good example: How accurate are temperature strips: time lapse video
Studying that post a little more closely, I don't think the results are that far off from my own. The probe temp sometimes gets to 7-8° higher than the strip before the next 10° step "light ups" on the strip. Using a single strip with 10° between units surely doesn't help matters.

I'll play with this comparison a little to try to make my overall results more applicable for a wider audience (I don't use temp strips generally).
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drgary
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#9: Post by drgary »

Long ago, I adapted a digital thermometers to the outside of the group of various home levers, including a 2nd gen Europiccola and a 1987 Cremina. That works really well and is easier to read than temperature strips. Currently I have a Europiccola with temperature strips. It's a 1st gen, where the heavy brass sleeved group is pretty stable. And it consistently pulls well-tuned shots. I haven't attached a pressure gauge to that machine since it's a 1964 model without a screw over the sightglass. I adjusted the boiler pressure when I set it up using a steam wand pressure gauge.
Gary
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MGBean
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#10: Post by MGBean »

Could you elaborate on the 'steam wand pressure gauge' please? What size fittings do you need to make one; does it attach to the wand tip, or to the valve body etc? Thank you.