Just purchased a Faema Lambro

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and4848

#1: Post by and4848 »

Hello!

I am new to the forums and this is my first post. I have a lot to learn and have found the topics to be already so helpful. I've recently acquired a Faema Lambro lever machine in pretty good condition. It could use some cleaning up and I haven't begun to take things apart to really inspect it.

My goal of course is to not only get it up and running, but truly understand all the working parts as I use this beautiful machine. I was wondering if anyone with good knowledge of the Lambros or even another owner had any overviews or even rough diagrams that break down the machine and it's parts. I have no experience with a lever machine, only pump driven so all very new!

This one was modified with an Auber instrument kit and briefly had it turned on to start heating up. Looking forward to hearing any feedback!

yoshi005

#2: Post by yoshi005 »

Congratulations! The Lambro ist a relaible and robust machine. And the best is that you can find almost all the spare parts.
An explosion digaram of the Lever group can be found here: https://www.tse.at/at/shop/index/cat/c2 ... ruppe.html
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IamOiman
Team HB

#3: Post by IamOiman »

I won't shill myself out too much, but I have a pretty well documented thread on the one I fixed up. It should get you started but if in doubt I have good recommendations on where to get parts for the best price.

Hopefully you can get it running up without too much hassle 8)

Restoration of a 1963 Faema Lambro [Finished]

I also request pics of your haul in its initial state!
-Ryan
Using a spice grinder violates the Geneva Convention
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and4848 (original poster)

#4: Post by and4848 (original poster) »

Thank you yoshi005-this is very helpful!

IamOiman, I'll get some pictures posted for sure! You're restoration is impressive and you should be proud. I actually went through it completely before even purchasing mine in an effort to familiarize myself.

The more I read, the more I felt that the undertaking of just understanding the boiler and it's mechanisms may be a lot to learn. Hopefully I'm just overthinking a bit. For instance, the safety of the pressure, I've read some people have redone them to have an updated valve?

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IamOiman
Team HB

#5: Post by IamOiman »

the wobbler weight can be kept, but I often switch it out for a modern one. That fitting is a common 3/8 BSPP so there are a variety of fittings that will fit. You can sneak in a vacuum valve too if there are fewer available boiler fittings than pipes and valves you want to install. Wobbler weights work fine with an oring but it's perfectly ok to go to the modern one. You can usually switch back to the original since there is no modification done to the boiler thread


I use a special fitting on the Lambro that is available for the cheapest on eevad https://www.eevad.com/en/block-for-flap ... 06895.html

-Ryan
Using a spice grinder violates the Geneva Convention
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and4848 (original poster)

#6: Post by and4848 (original poster) »

Ryan, thanks for that info. I've posted some interior pics. It seems a previous owner did some restoration/work on the machine as it looks like a newer valve has been added. I think learning the names of each part of the boiler will be the biggest challenge and understanding the mechanics of getting the machine running properly and safely.

The only thing it seems is missing is a basket for the portafilter.




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IamOiman
Team HB

#7: Post by IamOiman »

Looks to be in pretty good shape. What I am curious about the machine is how the pressure is regulated. It has a Solid State Relay, which usually is paired with a PID but I am not seeing how the temperature probe is connected. If there is a pressurestat I am not seeing that either. You can see my Sirai/Asco pstat and the pipe that goes to the boiler fitting on my Lambro.


The vacuum valve connect to the boiler where the pstat pipe normally attaches, and there is a modern safety valve where the old wobbler weight would connect. The gaskets look handmade out of teflon/ptfe and silicone. Only other comment is the wacky looking thermosyphon pipe that loops around to the group. Not sure if that is original or a replacement but I think it's the latter seeing the differently shaped fitting going in the group compared to the bottom one.
-Ryan
Using a spice grinder violates the Geneva Convention
LMWDP #612

and4848 (original poster)

#8: Post by and4848 (original poster) »

Thanks. Mounted to the bottom is this Auber unit, I should have included this image when I sent them. I know this sets temp, but unsure if pressure is different? Apologies for so many possibly dumb questions.

Assuming I get a portafilter basket (any you recommend?) and get this hooked up with water, think I can start attempting a first flush and shot safely? Any first time recommends? I'm going into the mechanics rather blindly!

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bostonbuzz

#9: Post by bostonbuzz »

You will have to include photos of the whole machine or risk account suspension... just kidding.

Pressure and temperature for water in a container are one and the same thing. Water boils at 212F at sea level under atmospheric pressure. Every 1 psi over that and the temperature will rise 3F. Which is why people cook more efficiently with pressure cookers. Under vacuum the reverse is true and under enough of a vacuum water will boil at room temperature.

So at 1.0 bar relative, your water temperature will be something like 250F. Your machine will cool a degree or two and the heater will kick back on say, at 240F or .8 bar, and it will not be able to heat the water at that pressure. No big deal since the water will be boiling and creating steam. This will increase the pressure and allow the water to reach 250 under pressure.

I think I learned this working on machines as well, fun stuff.

https://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/amp ... d_926.html
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