Cafelat Robot User Experience - Page 442

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Kinukcafe

#4411: Post by Kinukcafe »

Thanks for confirming.

I aim for 1:20 but end up 1:21ish. That's what I learnt as the ideal ratio. I used 17.5G coffee. You actually raised a good question. I wonder Why the shot pulled in YouTube video looks much longer than the 36g I have ??

Here is the grounded coffee. Does it look too fine to you?


I learnt from the forums and break down the crumbs with toothpick and redistribute a bit by moving the tamper in a circular motion on top of coffee. And tamper with light pressure.

The coffee tastes not okay but not too terrible. So much to work on before I nail. But one thing I think I should fix first is the obvious channeling. I tried just tiny slightly coarser and still have channeling and start tasting sour but it may due to other variables. Not sure. But maybe I should focus on the channeling first. I'm kind of loss on what to try next. Any advice appreciated.

Ken5
Supporter ★

#4412: Post by Ken5 »

Oh... and those cracks that you see on the puck most likely happen when you lift the handles to remove the basket from the robot. Pulling the gasket up will draw water, and or air if you press all the liquid out, upwards through the puck. Manual has a blurb about puck analysis and the robot.

Ken5
Supporter ★

#4413: Post by Ken5 »

Hard to tell grind size from a photo. You should definitely break up those clumps before pressing the shot. Some say that a toothpick is too thick. Many options out there for wdt tools, anything from something you make yourself to something that you buy. I bought the levercraft WDT and I love it! Works well and is a pleasure to use. Search the site for options.

It is hard to tell from the video if the grind was right, mainly because there is no way to know how hard you were pressing. If you were pressing really hard I would think you were chocking the shot slightly with the grind setting you were using.

If you were pressing really hard I would say to try a coarser setting to see how it tastes. You will figure it out.

Kinukcafe

#4414: Post by Kinukcafe »

Ken5 wrote:Oh... and those cracks that you see on the puck most likely happen when you lift the handles to remove the basket from the robot. Pulling the gasket up will draw water, and or air if you press all the liquid out, upwards through the puck. Manual has a blurb about puck analysis and the robot.
Oh. I didn't notice there is an online version. I only read the hard copy comes with the package and it is much shorter in contents.

One thing I am confused in the manual is - it is recommended to press the filter firmly in place but also said "if one were to press it down firmly, it would almost certainly caused damaged screen." How firm should I press against the coffee without damaging it?

I was just placing it gentle on top of the coffee. Maybe that's why the channeling and inclined coffee after extraction?

Kinukcafe

#4415: Post by Kinukcafe »

Ken5 wrote:Hard to tell grind size from a photo. You should definitely break up those clumps before pressing the shot. Some say that a toothpick is too thick. Many options out there for wdt tools, anything from something you make yourself to something that you buy. I bought the levercraft WDT and I love it! Works well and is a pleasure to use. Search the site for options.

It is hard to tell from the video if the grind was right, mainly because there is no way to know how hard you were pressing. If you were pressing really hard I would think you were chocking the shot slightly with the grind setting you were using.

If you were pressing really hard I would say to try a coarser setting to see how it tastes. You will figure it out.
Great advice. Let me try.

Ken5
Supporter ★

#4416: Post by Ken5 »

Kinukcafe wrote: One thing I am confused in the manual is - it is recommended to press the filter firmly in place but also said "if one were to press it down firmly, it would almost certainly caused damaged screen." How firm should I press against the coffee without damaging it?
Paul changed the screen from the original screen with the metal handle to the one with the silicone handle. The metal handled screen had a rolled lip that made the center of the screen sit slightly higher than the rolled edge. He since changed to the red silicone handle with a completely flat metal screen. I doubt you can damage that, especially since the bed is already flat from being tamped. I just press hard enough to get the nub into the bed.

Kinukcafe

#4417: Post by Kinukcafe » replying to Ken5 »

Great. I hope it is the cause to the channeling. And I will try finer grind this time. Finger crossed.

Ken5
Supporter ★

#4418: Post by Ken5 »

Coarser.

Jonk

#4419: Post by Jonk »

With the original, old shower screen completely in metal, pressing out all of the liquid hard with the levers had a high risk of deforming the screen or break the metal pin.
I'd say there's still a risk of breaking the new silicone pin - but the actual screen is sturdier, completely flat and shouldn't deform as easy. There are replacement silicone pin/nubs for sale.

Deformed screens without pins can still be used, even if it's not as convenient. Paper filters also work as a substitute.

Kinukcafe

#4420: Post by Kinukcafe »

Just to report back:
Changes for this trial:
- 14g as per Cafelat manual
- no tapping at all on the PF
- tampering with fingers only (more gentle)
- (think this is major factor for the improvement) I pressed the screen down 360 degree. Make sure it has contact to the grounded coffee. I think I probably left void between them before
- I didn't count pull time but I reviewed the video after that I found I only pulled for 18s (excluding infusion). Not sure it is acceptable as the shot is only 28g.

Thing unchanged:
- ratio 1:2
- grind size
- 10s preinfusion

I am over the moon that (I think) address the channeling issue. (Or not?). But the drink is bitter and without any sweetness. Minimal crema. As discussed before, I will try coarser tomorrow (too much coffee in a day). Tried to change one thing a time.