Cafelat Robot User Experience - Page 391

A haven dedicated to manual espresso machine aficionados.
YeetSkeeterson

#3901: Post by YeetSkeeterson »

Yes thanks for this. I got my "forever grain mill" recently and the honey mood period doesn't seem like it'll ever wear off. Hand made in Austria, wooden chassis with a custom motor and natural granite stones... easily adjustable via a single gigantic stainless thread, almost no plastics except where completely necessary. A single switch just like a coffee grinder. The Vitamix, or Kafatek, of grain mills...

I guess this sort of justifies my desire for a Monolith. I have a pretty standard electric oven. The grain mill I have is top grade but I don't have a $3,500 stone based oven just for breads. However I still absolutely love it and it has improved my bread with the tool I have available, even if marginally as I learn more.

It's easy to roast my own medium/dark beans with the SR800 roaster. Getting a Monolith would also give me an excuse to try light coffees from roasters all over, although I've made the move almost exclusively to organic coffees so selection is limited.

ojaw

#3902: Post by ojaw »

YeetSkeeterson wrote: It's easy to roast my own medium/dark beans with the SR800 roaster. Getting a Monolith would also give me an excuse to try light coffees from roasters all over, although I've made the move almost exclusively to organic coffees so selection is limited.
If you're roasting your own I would think there would be a huge variety and number of green organic beans available from all over, since they're unroasted time is much less of an issue, no?

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YeetSkeeterson

#3903: Post by YeetSkeeterson » replying to ojaw »

I have had no trouble ordering quite a variety from even just a single green coffee store. I meant if I end up with a Kafatek I'd like some light coffee, organic, from a high-quality specialty roaster which would be far more difficult to find, and I'm guessing expensive when including shipping a single bag plus tax just to try it out on my Robot. Yes green beans, no problem, I still have a solid selection left to try from Burman before I order my usuals and possibly move on to the next green coffee supplier I find. I usually order 5+ coffee varietals at a time from Burman. Last time I did get a couple non-organic that sounded very interesting. I'm no purist in that regard, it's too difficult and costly.

I can pull pretty consistently on my Robot and have kept grind settings notes for all of my home roasted beans. There will always be slight variation, but I really wish I could taste some flat burrs on my Robot.

K7

#3904: Post by K7 »

YeetSkeeterson wrote:...with the limitations of Robot techniques (I am not one to obfuscate the process, a steam heated basket is as far as I will go) I'm not sure how beneficial it will be. It could be a safety net for when I get temperature-stable gear in the future but I honestly haven't much of a desire to go beyond my Robot.
I have become so accustomed to manual gear that I can never land on where to go next. Perhaps I should be looking into convenient piston preheating techniques rather than new gear... But flat burrs have always called my name.
Preheating the piston and PF is actually not bad once you find good vessels and settle down on a routine. Here are mine. Use 1-cup "Pyrex" to boil water in microwave (2 minutes). I do this while the kettle is going so very little extra time spent here. Use 1/4 cup of it for piston, 3/4 cup for PF. Before submerging the PF, I dip the basket in the water to preheat it to a varying amount. Basket preheating amount is how I control the brewing temp (-2C, 0, +2C) while I ALWAYS preheat the piston and PF as baseline to keep the temp decline moderate. Again, very little extra time needed here because it's done while I grind and prep the puck. With this routine, I don't feel like Robot is running short on temp and I get very consistent output temp (I measured it for weeks lol). Another reason I always preheat piston and PF is to keep the back-to-back shots consistent. Otherwise, I would have to cool them down for the 2nd shot to be the same as the 1st one.

I too pondered "upgrading" to another machine in the past...But once i figured out the temp routine I became a happy camper. :)


thirdcrackfourthwave

#3905: Post by thirdcrackfourthwave »

jpender wrote:But if it's clean then it's most likely the seal. For whatever reason my seals have lasted on average just a little under a year. In each case occasional hissing or water leaks become more frequent and more severe.

I've wondered why mine start failing after 11-12 months while others get years of use. What's the difference?
Just thinking out loud. . .could be multifactorial. . .relative humidity of the environment comes to mind. After over 2.5 years I haven't had any issues (knock on wood) and I live in 'moistish' place for much of the year.

Jonk

#3906: Post by Jonk »

YeetSkeeterson wrote:I have the Kinu M47 and with the limitations of Robot techniques (I am not one to obfuscate the process, a steam heated basket is as far as I will go) I'm not sure how beneficial it will be.
To begin with, I think the differences traditional flat vs. conical is overstated and I found the Kinu M47 to be a slight improvement over the Mazzer Major it replaced.

But if you get one of the 'unimodal' style flat burrs it is beneficial paired with a Robot as well.. For the kind of light roasts that I found myself having to go to great lengths to extract properly with a traditional espresso grinder. Not only pre-heating everything but filter sandwich and blooming espresso shots. Even so I didn't really find them worthwhile until I bought the modest 64mm SSP brew burrs. As a bonus, high temperatures are not as critical the more unimodal your grinds are. I still think pre-heating the piston to have less decline is a good idea most of the time, but the other parts are superfluous since I might not even use boiling water.

Jeff
Team HB

#3907: Post by Jeff »

Moderator note: The discussion previously here with Welshdog has been moved to Dialing-in Espresso As A Sensitive Taster

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jpender

#3908: Post by jpender »

thirdcrackfourthwave wrote:Just thinking out loud. . .could be multifactorial. . .relative humidity of the environment comes to mind. After over 2.5 years I haven't had any issues (knock on wood) and I live in 'moistish' place for much of the year.
How moistish?

Where I live the RH is typically 60-80% in the morning when I make coffee. I'm not really sure how moisture affects the durability of silicone rubber. Does it make it better or worse? Surely heat affects it. I've wondered if my piston preheating, which usually submerges the piston in 90-100°C water for a couple of minutes, might have a cumulative effect.

Beats me. I'm curious about it but I'm okay spending $6 a year on a new seal.

thirdcrackfourthwave

#3909: Post by thirdcrackfourthwave » replying to jpender »

I am sorry I don't have any specific data for in my house. https://www.weather-us.com/en/oregon-us ... y_relative. We don't have A/C and winters inside are not 83%. My guess would be a all things being equal these things last longer in Seattle than Phoenix. FTR I generally don't preheat--I used to but didn't notice much of a difference with medium roasts. Also FTR six bucks is looking great after the fridge blew up this week. Also looking great v. all the maintenance and repair costs of semi-auto.

jpender

#3910: Post by jpender »

thirdcrackfourthwave wrote:I am sorry I don't have any specific data for in my house. https://www.weather-us.com/en/oregon-us ... y_relative. We don't have A/C and winters inside are not 83%.
I'm just 600 miles or so down the same coast, also sans A/C, and the RH is pretty similar.

thirdcrackfourthwave wrote:My guess would be a all things being equal these things last longer in Seattle than Phoenix.
Why would you guess that higher humidity is protective compared to lower humidity? Do you imagine the seal drying out?