Boiler overfill problem

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Clint Orchuk

#1: Post by Clint Orchuk »

Came in this morning and had a minor flood. Our Astoria 2 group lever's boiler overfilled in the night and was leaking from the negative pressure valve and the over pressure valve. I unplugged it, and disconnected it from the plumbing. I assume it's either a problem with the autofill probe, the fill solenoid, or the gicar. Any one have any advice on how to trouble shoot this problem? What should I look at first?


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stefano65
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#2: Post by stefano65 »

Start with the simple one,
turn water on
before plugging it in
wait few minutes and see if the level is rising again on his own,
if so then the solenoid is not closing properly,
if nothing happens and the boiler is not filling then
plug it in and turn the main switch on
lever machine doesn't have the motor therefor your autofill will only click (the control box relay will make the clicking)
if so then it could be the level probe or the signal to the control box and/or the ground
Stefano Cremonesi
Stefano's Espresso Care
Repairs & sales from Oregon.

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Clint Orchuk (original poster)

#3: Post by Clint Orchuk (original poster) »

Thanks Stefano,
I hooked up the water supply and it didn't leak past the solenoid. When I turned the switch on, the boiler began to fill. I shut the main switch off so it wouldn't over fill . There is no scale on the level probe. What do you suggest I check next?

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erics
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#4: Post by erics »

First thing I would do is syphon some water out of the boiler below the normal level and disable the heating element.

I would check that the single wire leading from the level probe to the control box has 100% continuity. Its the easiest thing to check but the least likely to be at fault. Remove one wire from the fill solenoid coil to disable it or just remove the solenoid coil and set aside . . . whichever is easiest

Now turn the power on. If you DO NOT hear any click from the control box, this tells me that the relay for the fill solenoid is stuck in a closed position.
Skål,

Eric S.
http://users.rcn.com/erics/
E-mail: erics at rcn dot com

IMAWriter
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#5: Post by IMAWriter »

Clint, that is a precious child. My goodness. :D
Sorry for the OT.
Rob
LMWDP #187
www.robertjason.com

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allon

#6: Post by allon »

erics wrote: Now turn the power on. If you DO NOT hear any click from the control box, this tells me that the relay for the fill solenoid is stuck in a closed position.
On my machine every time I turn it on the autofill activates for a couple of seconds regardless of the boiler level.

I once had a problem with it seeping past the fill solenoid and was going to replace it but the problem went away. I also hedge by cutting the water when the machine isn't on; I do not leave the machine on 24x7 -- I only use it on the weekends, for the most part.

Check to see if there is a valve for adjusting the autofill flow - my machine has one. Turn it off all the way and fill manually as needed. If the overfill problem persists then it is likely the manual valve leaking. If it goes away, it is the solenoid.
LMWDP #331

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stefano65
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#7: Post by stefano65 »

follow Eric suggestion to remove the wires of the coil (careful one in 230v machine is always hot)
but I will keep the boiler level high
so technically the machine SHOULD not be asking for more water,
then in addition get a multimeter and
carefully while the coil is disconnected test for voltage, between the 2 hot one
if the coils wires are reading voltage then you know 100% that the coil/solenoid is getting power when it should not
at this point in time you can play with the ground to level probe,
to see if the issue is the connecting between them or is a bad control box
Stefano Cremonesi
Stefano's Espresso Care
Repairs & sales from Oregon.

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erics
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#8: Post by erics »

Stefano's post above IS the way to do it rather than trying to listen for a click or clack.
Skål,

Eric S.
http://users.rcn.com/erics/
E-mail: erics at rcn dot com

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Clint Orchuk (original poster)

#9: Post by Clint Orchuk (original poster) »

Thanks for all of the help. Thanks for the OT Robert, she's a good kid and helps out a lot. She turns 2 in a month.

I'm too scared to mess with 230V wires while it's plugged in. Shouldn't I unplug the machine before I remove the coil wires? Do I disconnect them at the coil, or at the other end? It sounds like Stefano is saying I should test the voltage at the coil when the machine is plugged in.

Has anyone got a photo of what I should do? Honestly, messing with electrical stuff when it's plugged in, scares the hell out of me.

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erics
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#10: Post by erics »

Has anyone got a photo of what I should do? Honestly, messing with electrical stuff when it's plugged in, scares the hell out of me.
That's understandable. Post a pic of your boiler fill solenoid valve showing the wire connections.
Skål,

Eric S.
http://users.rcn.com/erics/
E-mail: erics at rcn dot com