1980 La Pavoni Eurobar [Finished]

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IamOiman
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#1: Post by IamOiman »

Here is a new project, a 1980 Pavoni Eurobar. It took over a month for this guy to arrive, including a near month lack of updates on the tracking number leaving me in a concerned state until it finally updated as going through US customs last week. It was adequately packed for the trip and I have not seen any shipping damange.





I got this guy because it's super orange, and also to try out a manual thermosyphon. I thought this was the only mass produced style but I was reminded the Gaggia Achille exists too. The emblems were already off due to failed adhesive but they were kept with the machine that I sourced near Siena in Italy. I had a friend pick it up and ship it to me.




-Ryan
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IamOiman (original poster)
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#2: Post by IamOiman (original poster) »

I will be trying a new style of organizing my posts, as with the number of pictures I post I often get lost trying to figure out where to reference specific tasks I did on my projects.

1) Panels come off
After some quick checks on parts references I brought the Eurobar downstairs for disassembly. The front panels and a lower rear panel come off via phillips screws. The long screws on the lower panels are for threading into the bottom base of the machine




I popped off the steam valve so I could access the side panel more easily. It is secured by two indents on the bottom of the panel that slip onto the chassis. It slips off with a strong tug along with its opposite twin. The rear panel can be taken off with only one panel removed.





-Ryan
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IamOiman (original poster)
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#3: Post by IamOiman (original poster) »

2) Pipes and fittings
I took off as many pipes as possible.I could not take off one of the thermosyphon pipes without a crow wrench I did not have so that had to wait until the boiler is off the chassis. I found an odd, waxy substance covering all fittings going to the boiler and the little brass block behind the group. I am really hoping it's not for sealing purposes as they are all degraded and cracked.



The sight glass is the same style found on Europiccolas. It came off easily, and what is nice about the elbow glass fittings is they have little bosses that prevent the fitting from turning and snapping the glass while attemping to unscrew the support nut.





The two valves are an old design but I don't know if they exist on any of the commercial machines of that era (P90 or DP9).

-Ryan
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IamOiman (original poster)
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#4: Post by IamOiman (original poster) »

3) Group removal and disassembly
With the pipes loosened from the group connection block I took off the two M6 bolts securing the group to brackets behind the backsplash (that also come off in the process). It was quite nasty inside due to failing piston seals but I was able to take everything apart without too much hassle.







The same wax substance is on this block and I am again curious about its purpose. I am also curious if the block is brazed into the group or if it threads on.
-Ryan
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IamOiman (original poster)
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#5: Post by IamOiman (original poster) »

4) Element and Boiler removal
At this point it was just the boiler and the feet still attached to the chassis. The eight allen head bolts were loosened, although they were gummed up with the rubber boiler gasket and resisted coming fully out. The heating element popped out with some leverage and getting under the gasket. The heating element is good (I measured 50Ω with my multimeter), and is stamped February 1980.







The boiler should have come out but it was stuck due to frame corrosion. I had to get a razor blade under the lip of the boiler to begin separating the frame from the boiler. I now understand why there is a lip on the boiler face, and that is because the frame supports the boiler gasket against the element.






The Eurobar is fully apart. I will start cleaning and see what I can do about the frame, and whether it needs a full coating or if I will keep it fully original. I am also going to investigate the waxy stuff as I may need to redo all the boiler fittings if it is not good.

-Ryan
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Blernsball
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#6: Post by Blernsball »

So cool.

That looks like a standard europiccola/ professional group from that era? What does the block brazed on the back do?

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IamOiman (original poster)
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#7: Post by IamOiman (original poster) »

Instead of a dipper tube going in the boiler a loop is created by the pipes going to and from the block in the back that in theory keeps the group hot but not burning hot via cycling hot water around. Since it uses water from the boiler it is known as an open thermosyphon (closed thermosyphon is usually for HX machines with a pump but water still cycles in a loop). The third fitting is the tube going to the hot water valve.
-Ryan
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Javier
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#8: Post by Javier »

Great find, Ryan! The La Pavoni Eurobar is one of my favorite lever espresso machines. Looking forward to your updates!
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#9: Post by IamOiman (original poster) »

5) Cleaning and crack discovery
Welp I was hoping to not run into issues, but during cleaning the boiler I discovered a crack about three inches long running vertically towards one of the fittings. It does not look great, and I cannot tell if the crack was present before disassembly. Looking inside it may seem to appear it's been there for a while but now I need to make the decision to braze it up or leave it (leaning towards the former right now). I would also braze the fitting in the process on the exterior after cleaning off the wax stuff. The wax stuff is peeling off some of the boiler fittings.





The pipes and valves are descaled and will be cleaned up further in the tumbler or wire wheel. The group bore is mostly clean but now it will be gently sanded.


-Ryan
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#10: Post by IamOiman (original poster) »

6) Repairing the crack
I decided to braze the crack with Cupalloys 455 silver solder using MAP Pro with the Bernzomatic TS8000 torch. This is the largest brazing repair I have yet attempted, and after preparing the damaged area it required over a minute of heating the boiler to reach brazing temps. It took over a minute more to lay the solder along the crack and around the fitting, and required 20 minutes of cooling for me to touch the piece and clean it in citric acid. It turned out better than I was expecting, and I could see on the inside the crack did fully penetrate the brass :shock: . The solder should hold under 1 bar provided I properly covered the entire crack (which so far appears so).






-Ryan
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