1967 La San Marco Tipo 6X

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IamOiman
Team HB

#1: Post by IamOiman »

This is one my first San Marco machines. It was purchased as part of a larger lot of machines from my friend Francesco in Rome for a fair price. This particular machine was originally from Venice. The exterior is in really nice condition, although the red colored panel has rust on the inside so I am still determining whether to redo that part.





And of course I had to tear it apart the next day...

There is a front body panel that covers the group, and it attaches to the rear housing via six phillips screws, three on each side. It is easiest to slide it off with the lever fork in the down position and the bakelite knobs taken off the valves. You can see the rust I was mentioning earlier on the powdercoated panels.





The back housing comes off after the front backsplash (which comes in two panels secured by two screws each). Two screws secure the panel assembly to the frame. I had to tilt the panels from the rear of the machine at a nearly 45 degree angle to slip them out from the frame.



The mercury pstat and its pipe + wiring came off next so I could access all of the boiler bolts. The wiring and pipe are taped together. One of the terminal connectors looked really busted, perhaps it failed in the past. The bolts look replaced from the originals with Stainless Steel A2 M10 bolts. I decided to try out my latest acquisition, impact sockets, with my little 12V impact gun. I just would run the tool in brief intervals, and it works pretty well. Inside the boiler was a decent amount of scale. I also found a piece inside that goes to the wobbler weight.









I thought with the scale I would have a hard time getting the pipes off, but they mostly yielded without too much trouble. I had to soak a few fittings and heat them up before they would yield but nothing drastic was necessary. The sight glass is secured by a long rod that threads on the bottom of the housing and pushes the upper part against the glass.







The boiler is secured only by the group flange. I needed a big wrench to loosen the big nut. The flange and lower group could finally be removed after. At this point it was just the water inlet, drain tray, and gas assembly that remained until they too came off. The lower skirt is secured by four screws on the bottom. The front frame screw directly into the frame but the rear feet thread into a large counterweight in the back that is separable from the frame (and has to weigh 20lb, it's heavy!)



And thus initial strip down is complete. When more time is available I can start taking apart the valves and group and proceed from there. Thankfully no big problems have revealed themselves in the process.

-Ryan
Using a spice grinder violates the Geneva Convention
LMWDP #612

cedar

#2: Post by cedar »

You sure get to work quickly -- well done.

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truemagellen
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#3: Post by truemagellen »

Your first LSM...really can't wait for this one to complete. Look forward to seeing it in your museum. :mrgreen:

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IamOiman (original poster)
Team HB

#4: Post by IamOiman (original poster) »

I am just as excited as you are 8)

The group got wrangled apart last night. The first part I took off was the inlet valve cap nut on the bottom of the group. Next I clamped the assembly in my vise and took a look at the piston.

There are four notches for a spanner tool or socket to lock in, but the piston does does not keep the springs compressed. With this lack of force pushing against the piston I decided to just try an oil strap tool, and I was able to loosen it with a tug. There is a big nut that clamps against a plate that actually holds the springs. Not much effort was needed to start unscrewing it with a 27mm wrench. Since the plate between the nut and springs actually holds those springs, the springs did not rub or move during loosening like I have experienced on zodiac groups. I also have to praise San Marco with serviceability, as I the springs were fully relaxed before the nut came off.







With springs off the group I could take apart the lever fork and bearings. One of the bearing bolts/pins is a left hand thread just to note. After taking those off the lever fork pin could be knocked out. The pin is designed such that it will push one of the bearings out on the side the pin exits. The pin does not interact with the piston rod eye. Rather there are little roller pins held by an outer shell (which is what touches the eye) that the fork pin interacts with.




The inlet lever rocker comes off when a c clip is popped out. I use chopsticks to get this done, a little trick I picked up back in my Pavoni Professional days


The valves also came apart. Taking a look at the parts diagrams I realized these valves are still utilized by San Marco in their modern machines like the 105 and 85. I really like how they kept their design consistent, as I can literally purchase every part and fitting on all the valves (and on other stuff like the group) without issue besides the bakelite knobs.






This was the current state as of 9pm last night before I called it for the day. One interesting thing to note is there was a fat little spring inside the piston that pushed against the big spring nut. I believe it was used to create a little tension on the piston threads to help keep it in place on the piston rod. I wanted to take apart the manometer too but I do not have a small enough flathead screwdriver to loosen the screws. Usually a date can be found on the inside which is why I want to open it up.



-Ryan
Using a spice grinder violates the Geneva Convention
LMWDP #612

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IamOiman (original poster)
Team HB

#5: Post by IamOiman (original poster) »

And this is the progress made today 8)

The piston does come apart into two pieces. This allows me to slip off the one piston gasket, and I was surprised to see that is made of two pieces, a v gasket and a little v shim (the notches were found, I did not make that cut). I have asked around and so far nobody has ever seen this piston seal nor the little spring. The upper piston had a lot of grease on it. There is a little groove inside the upper housing that holds a felt piece. I do not understand its purpose to be honest, except perhaps it absorbs grease for lubrication purposes. Outside of the one way valve the entire group is now apart, and I could proceed with cleaning.







I first degreased the parts covered in the smelly lubrication grease with Gunk Engine cleaner followed by a rinse of water. This stuff does not work well on coffee oils so after that I tossed the parts in the ultrasonic cleaner with Glo Joe/coffee detergent for some time. This cleaned the majority of the filth from most parts.





Many of the valve pieces and water sight had a citric acid bath, and the non-chromed pieces were tossed in the magnetic tumbler for the final cleanup. There was a little gasket stuck on three fittings that had to be burned and chipped out in pieces. In the meanwhile I did manage to take off the one way valve. It has a little ball that pushes against a gasket to prevent water from flowing back into the boiler.





Finally, I have an approximation of the date of this machine. I found a tiny flathead screwdriver from a glasses repair kit to unscrew the little flathead screws. The bezel was pretty stuck but it yielded eventually. Taking off three screws in the back finally allowed me to find the little date written on the back of the manometer indicator plate. November 28 1967. This machine model had a few variants that resulted in a naming nomenclature of Tipo 6X. I have seen 64, 65, 67, and 69 from other posts online, and I approximated mine with 69 but I will probably never know for sure since the id tag is blank on that.


-Ryan
Using a spice grinder violates the Geneva Convention
LMWDP #612