1957 Faema Marte 53mm group [Finished] - Page 2

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Sansibar99

#11: Post by Sansibar99 »

Ryan, is the boiler endplate made of iron or brass?
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IamOiman (original poster)
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#12: Post by IamOiman (original poster) »

Brass
-Ryan
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drgary
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#13: Post by drgary »

The Lady Duchessa home lever group looks like its design inspiration is the curved Marte/Mercurio group. The similarity includes the ability to lock down the lever for pre-infusion. I don't know any other home lever capable of this. My Lady D dates back to 1960, so the timeline fits too. Here's my Duchessa with Cher's (doubleOsoul) on my workbench awhile back.

Gary
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IamOiman (original poster)
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#14: Post by IamOiman (original poster) »

I disassembled the valves. Nothing dramatic happened in the process, but it is definitely apparent that the lower fittings are definitely really worn. In fact they look so worn I could swear that the lower fittings are not chrome but just plated (see further down about this).

The water inlet has two threads to unscrew to access the spring and gasket assemby. There is also a second v-gasket to seal the pin that the bakelite handle activates when you squeeze it. The gasket assembly does not unscrew but rather the gasket just slips off.






The steam and hot water valves are essentially the same, not withstanding the additional valve piece the latter screws into that is part of the water sight assembly. The water sight assembly itself is simple enough. The decorative glass cover cannot come off without unscrewing the ends. The sight glass gaskets are just like the ones on the E61/Presidents but are twice as thick (so I will use two gaskets per end).




The drain attaches to the right foot. It appears to be plated too.


I did a cleaning bath for the disassembled pieces. I also removed an ungodly amount of hemp, it was the nastiest stuff I've ever seen. The lower fittings are pretty 'tired' but now I am thinking they were not originally chromed but plated with something else. This possibility is why I am not immediately considering rechroming those parts. I also realized the wobbler weight pin has a big fat gasket rather than a metal to metal seal.





I also finished disassembling the lower skirt piece. I tried my best to save the rusted screws by wire brushing as much rust off as I could and adding a little penetrating oil to soak. Some screws were saved but others were sheared. This is why I really dislike carbon steel rather than using stainless steel with all of this rust. The gold piece attaches to the bottom skirt via two M4 screws. The lower frame is attached to the chrome skirt in the rear via two of the M4 screws, which also secure the ends of the little panel brackets.









The lower frame piece has 4014 stamped on it. Looking at the upper frame 401 is stamped, and there is possibly a 4 but is obscured. The two bracket pieces have 124014 stamped on them, just like the chrome skirt.




-Ryan
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IamOiman (original poster)
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#15: Post by IamOiman (original poster) »

Well, soon after I made my last post my tool shipment arrived to disassemble the upper group. The piston has four 4mm holes to allow a pin spanner wrench to exert force on the piston. However, there is little material for the pin to grasp, meaning the piston can be easily damaged compared to other pistons. Thus I was anticipating that not much force would be necessary to take off the piston (which I was correct). There is evidence of past servicing of the piston from the small dents in the piston wall. The spring had a little compression force still, and the piston was pushed a little outwards when the end of the threads were reached, but essentially the spring was almost completely relaxed. Taking off the piston and spring allowed me to unscrew the hex nut compressing the v-gasket at the end of the upper group casting.






With the spring off the fork and piston rod could come out. I first had to unscrew the two bearing guides, which only will unscrew fully when the fork is in the cocked position. That is the purpose of the sermicircle cuts in the fork to allow those guides to pop out. With the fork and rod out I could then take off the snap rings securing the bearings to the fork. The bearings themselves came off with my bearing separator (and puller) tool. The lever fork rod then could be tapped out. Overall the fork is in decent shape, not much wear has been observed.







The last piece to come off was the small pin in the back of the group casting that secures the chromed cover, via a small flathead screwdriver. Thus the group is now in pieces not withstanding the rubber stops (and possibly a grease pin). So far there is no indication of serious wear so far, so I may be able to reuse most parts. In the same shipment I also received the square drive needed to unscrew the radiator fitting, but I will clean up the hole first since it is filled with rust right now.



-Ryan
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#16: Post by IamOiman (original poster) »

mikel wrote:The top of that group has sides around the bearings. Do the sides come off?
and no, to answer you question the sides do not come off, just the small bearing guides. The fork and rod assembly just lift out from the top if they need to be removed.
-Ryan
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Henning S.

#17: Post by Henning S. »

It would be really nice if we could manage to get some more knowledge about the numbering of the French Faema machines. Unfortunately, the machines (I know) lack of an ANCC marking or something comparable on the boiler, so that an exact assignment to the date of manufacture as Sebastien has undertaken here will probably not be possible.
Nevertheless I noticed that some of the French Martes start with the number 12 XXXX, but on some elements like the frame only the rear digits were stamped, as you can see here on this machine:
Serial number 12 4014 and on the frame only 4014 [edit: corrected]

My 1grp. Marte has the serial number 12 3041 and at the frame there is 3041
and Henks Marte the 12 3027

Sebastien expressed in a short discussion with me the idea that the first two digits could possibly represent the type OR number of groups + type, I find this thought very interesting. For example, my French Mercurio has the number 11 7197 and on the frame there is only the 7197. (11 = Mercurio, 12 = Marte ??)

Maybe we can collect some more data in a new thread (i will open one, if there is any interest), that would be great.

Sorry for the bit of OT Ryan. Very nice machine and thanks for the, as always, great documentation!
Henning

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#18: Post by IamOiman (original poster) »

Yes, that would make sense because of the frame numbering being 4014 compared to some of the body pieces having 12 4014 (the skirt, bracket pieces). I know Jupe 3.0 has quite a few martes so perhaps we can ask for his serial numbers on his two group Martes (if they are French) and see what the first two digits could represent.
-Ryan
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#19: Post by IamOiman (original poster) »

The final screw for the boiler-frame connection finally yielded after multiple heating cycles + quenchings, my impact driver, and finally the 'I wasn't asking' breaker bar adapted to my large flathead bit. This was sort of risky but I made sure the bit was deep in the slot of the screw so it would not shear off. The boiler could finally be separated from the upper frame. The longer screw is due to the nut that threads on the back where the gas shield attaches. It sort of looks like there may have been asbestos insulation at one point but now there is just possible remnants left. In this process I must have swept the working surface three or four times with the amount of crud that came out of this machine.







The boiler does not look very bad inside, and the calcium deposits crumble off the interior with the poking of a pick, so I do not anticipate issues to occur during descaling. The only number I found on the boiler was on the group neck, with a 5651 stamped on it. The radiator fitting is pretty worn inside, so much so my square drive does not reach the good portion of the square hole. I will need to devise an alternative solution to get it out, but am not sure what to do besides looking for 8mm square metal stock. The sheared bolts will hopefully be attended to soon.







I've been working on getting the grouphead apart, but the sleeve and the shutoff valve are still stuck so more soaking and time is needed for those. The tap rods are different in design, one of them being annoying as I have no easy method of grasping the gasket holder well since it is completely round.
-Ryan
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#20: Post by IamOiman (original poster) »

The radiator fitting is still stuck, so at this point I just decided to descale the boiler with it still attached. Since the majority of the scale deposits were knocked loose, it only needed about 18 hours to get the majority of the inside clean. In the pic there is still some loose scale that was removed after taking the pic. Now at this point the focus can be placed on removing the broken bolts and radiator fitting. I am still debating to keep the original paint but I am definitely leaning towards it.





The magnetic tumbler was utilized today. The lower fittings are definitely plated, and they were not stripped when placed in the tumbler. I did a test piece first before committing all of the pieces to this process, and they did clean up very nicely. They will thus not be chromed. The piston has two little dents where someone in the past grasped it, with some small teeth marks on the vertical face indicating pliers or a related tool. You can see how thin the metal is!




-Ryan
Using a spice grinder violates the Geneva Convention
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