Traditional singaporean Kopi

Want to talk espresso but not sure which forum? If so, this is the right one.
El_hondero

#1: Post by El_hondero »

an interesting short documentary i saw on youtube on Singaporean kopi roasting and culture
over here we call it Singaporean/ Nanyang coffee, but its actually pretty common in Malaysia and maybe indonesia ?
my dad told me some are roasted with sugar/ margarine and corn

Marcelnl
Supporter ♡

#2: Post by Marcelnl »

This is a fancy version of how I learned the Indonesian version of a brew; Kopi Tubruk
(which IMO is quite similar to a cupping protocol)
LMWDP #483

DamianWarS
Supporter ♡

#3: Post by DamianWarS »

When I'm served Kopi Turbuk in Indonesia it's made from a Turkish grind added directly to the cup like instant coffee with added sugar and is typically robusta. It's not filtered and you let it sit for a bit so the grinds sink and you don't drink the last bit (because it's just a sludge). Singaporean Kopi is different, it's filtered through a sock or cloth and milk is added with sugar commonly served with Kaya tost in the morning.

The roasting process of adding margarine, various cooking oils or sugar is because it's commodity coffee and things are added to take away from the bitterness and also to make the beans shiny and black (sorry to take away from the magic). Although I know less about how Singapore does it, when I go to a street coffee place in singapore it's always robusta.

Indonesia does do coffee like the OP such as the famous solong coffee in Banda Ache. They roast coffee over a wood flame inside of large drums that rotate and heeps of margarine is added and again it's robusta. Traditionally a large wooden mortar called a "lesung" hammers down on the roasted beans until powder. Maybe this is why it's called "tubruk" which is a word for a crash or something forcefully hitting into another thing. (Wooden "lesung" forfully crashing into the coffee beans)

That Indonesian video posted is some sort of adopted cupping method and not a traditional method. Immersion doesn't need a goose neck kettle nor do you need to slowly pour water over the coffee with the goose neck (that's for a pour over not immersion). The guy points out the "crema" of the coffee after the coffee has sunk to the bottom. If it were cupping it would be skimmed away but he is using it to demostrate how fresh the coffee is and seems to serve it this way. The Indonesian word he uses is "buih" which means "foam" and I'm fine calling it that but "crema" is probably the wrong word but I get Indonesian may be a bit limited in describing these things.

He seems to be based in Ache and I know a common method is to filter coffee through socks (a long cloth mesh filter) held high over several cups being perpared to create a head or foam. That's a traditional method and perhaps this guy is adopting some cupping method but is still seeking the foam effect to cater to the local demand. I'm not sure his goals but if I was served that the first thing I would do is skim the "buih" off.

Marcelnl
Supporter ♡

#4: Post by Marcelnl »

Interesting, the Kopi Tubruk I got acqainted with was made using a coarser grind, between brew and french press. Hot water poured on the grounds, stirred for like 30 seconds to then steep for approx 2=3 minutes prior to stirring into a swirl in order to submerge the grounds.
The origin of the family was the Moluccas Islands, perhaps there are local varieties too?
LMWDP #483

DamianWarS
Supporter ♡

#5: Post by DamianWarS » replying to Marcelnl »

I have no experience with the Moluccas Islands but Indonesia has a lot of cultural differences across their vast archipelago so it's no surprise to hear one part of the country does coffee different than the other part but they call it the same thing. east to west Indonesia covers the same distance of the east coast and west coast of the US it's just made up of thousands of islands and hundreds of people groups. My experiences are across Sumatra and Java which is vast enough but I wouldn't want to say one version is right over another.

it turns out there's a wiki article on it that opens with a definition of "Kopi Tubruk is an Indonesian-style coffee where coarse coffee grounds are boiled along with solid sugar, resulting in a thick drink similar to Turkish coffee" then as you go through the article under preparation it says "Kopi tubruk uses finely ground coffee beans. Sometimes, instant coffee is used, albeit one that contains no sugar or milk. These ground coffee beans are then mixed with boiled water". so the wiki article can't even get it straight which I think shows how much it can vary.

Marcelnl
Supporter ♡

#6: Post by Marcelnl »

surely, it likely even differs per island, or even per village how the coffee is brewed, just based on what is available, who made it first or where the idea was picked up
LMWDP #483

DamianWarS
Supporter ♡

#7: Post by DamianWarS » replying to Marcelnl »

What I like about the word "kopi" (which means coffee in maylay) is there is a verb form "ngopi" and it means to have coffee. There is a common expression "ngopi dulu" which means "coffee first". Indonesia/Singapore/Malaysia are very much coffee drinking places and the dominant preference is street coffee over specialty.