Quick coffee storing tip.

Want to talk espresso but not sure which forum? If so, this is the right one.
cpro48609

#1: Post by cpro48609 » Nov 12, 2019, 11:33 am

I've been using the Airscape containers which are awesome! When all the beans don't fit I also have been vac sealing the leftover beans and then break open a bag when the container runs low. It's been working out pretty well for keeping the beans fresh :)
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Radio.YYZ

#2: Post by Radio.YYZ » Nov 12, 2019, 10:32 pm

I do something similar. Vacuum seal it in a jar (primary) then i move some to a secondary jar for 5ish days doses and seal that toom, and repeat.
Good Coffee: Technique/Knowledge > Grinder > Beans > Water > Machine

RockyIII
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#3: Post by RockyIII » Nov 12, 2019, 11:41 pm

Looks nice, but don't the bags blow up like balloons from the carbon dioxide outgassing?

Rocky

cpro48609

#4: Post by cpro48609 » replying to RockyIII » Nov 18, 2019, 11:37 pm

Good point and I never thought of that lol. Ironically the bags are still airtight and feel the exact same when I open them. They are only in the bag for a week to a week and a half on average though.

cf

#5: Post by cf » Nov 21, 2019, 12:10 am

Great suggestion, I've got a new use for the vac sealer now!

jpender

#6: Post by jpender » Nov 21, 2019, 12:15 am

cpro48609 wrote:Good point and I never thought of that lol. Ironically the bags are still airtight and feel the exact same when I open them. They are only in the bag for a week to a week and a half on average though.

That means your coffee was relatively old when you vacuum sealed it. If it were fresh it would have inflated.

Try vac-sealing half the coffee from a batch and putting the other half in something as simple as a ziplock bag. Then compare the brewed coffee from each of them. Do it so that you don't know which is which when you're doing the tasting. Get a friend to help you or whatever. Report back here.

shadowzenith

#7: Post by shadowzenith » Nov 21, 2019, 4:24 am

RockyIII wrote:Looks nice, but don't the bags blow up like balloons from the carbon dioxide outgassing?

Rocky
They dont in my experience. I only vacuum seal them after about 10 or so days post-roast.
Been doing this for 2 years and so far so good.

cpro48609

#8: Post by cpro48609 » Nov 24, 2019, 7:32 pm

jpender wrote: That means your coffee was relatively old when you vacuum sealed it. If it were fresh it would have inflated.

Try vac-sealing half the coffee from a batch and putting the other half in something as simple as a ziplock bag. Then compare the brewed coffee from each of them. Do it so that you don't know which is which when you're doing the tasting. Get a friend to help you or whatever. Report back here.
Are you positive fresh beans expand an air sealed bag? I would think if it's air sealed tight the gas would be locked in and have nowhere to expand? I'm no engineer though lol. Ironically the beans are super fresh. I only use Nicoletti espresso roast beans and they arrive a few days after the roast date.

jpender

#9: Post by jpender » replying to cpro48609 » Nov 24, 2019, 9:01 pm


Fresh beans release enough carbon dioxide to expand a sealed bag. No question about that. It's the reason coffee is frequently sold in sealed bags with one-way valves. I've seen it the few times I've left vacuum sealed bags out at room temperature. Even bags that had been in the freezer for weeks or months still expand when allowed to warm up.

But maybe you're keeping them in the freezer? If that's the case then I wouldn't expect them to puff up at all.

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slybarman

#10: Post by slybarman » Nov 24, 2019, 10:26 pm

They will also off gas enough to pop the lid off a vacuum sealed Mason jar. If the beans are not far post roast, I will go back and reseal the mason jar after 5-7 days to take out the gases.