Questions regarding freezing coffee beans

Want to talk espresso but not sure which forum? If so, this is the right one.
romaen

Postby romaen » Jul 10, 2019, 2:15 am

Hello!

I am switching to single dosing, thats why I am going to store the beans in small containers.
I would like to store the rest of the coffee in the freezer.
Thats why I have some questions:

  • In which container should I store the beans in the freezer? Just a freezer bag or some plastic freezer containers? Should it be air-tight?
  • How long do I need to wait after getting the beans out of the freezer before grinding them?
  • After getting the beans out of the freezer, can I put them directly in the "small containers" and close them?
  • How long can I store them in the freezer?

Thanks for reading & helping!

bettysnephew

Postby bettysnephew » Jul 10, 2019, 7:39 am

In which container should I store the beans in the freezer? Just a freezer bag or some plastic freezer containers? Should it be air-tight?
I have never heard of anyone picking up taste from bags but I prefer to buy 5 lb. lots of coffee beans and store them in quart size

Mason jars.

How long do I need to wait after getting the beans out of the freezer before grinding them?

I grind mine right out of the freezer.

After getting the beans out of the freezer, can I put them directly in the "small containers" and close them?

I do that and it seems to work well for me.

How long can I store them in the freezer?

I have gone as long as two months when I had to be away for volunteer work. Did not really note any degradation but they had been vacuum packed and frozen while I was away. I have seen others say both ways to this but my experience has been good.
Suffering from EAS (Espresso Acquisition Syndrome)
LMWDP #586

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Balthazar_B

Postby Balthazar_B » Jul 10, 2019, 8:49 am

Roman, just one more little tip. If you get a set of small containers that are identical in weight, it makes the process of breaking down your Mason jar beans into individual doses a bit easier, since you don't need to tare your scale every time.

I prefer glass to plastic. Here are the ones I use. They'll hold about 18-20 g of beans. 4 oz versions are available if you dose really large.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01MUC3K08/
- John

LMWDP # 577

romaen

Postby romaen » Jul 10, 2019, 1:17 pm

Thank you both for your help, I really appreciate it! :)

bettysnephew

Postby bettysnephew » Jul 11, 2019, 7:10 am

@romaen

Looks like you got gang posted by the "Bosco Gang"! LOL :D :D
Suffering from EAS (Espresso Acquisition Syndrome)
LMWDP #586

Mrbiglzwerth

Postby Mrbiglzwerth » Jul 12, 2019, 9:30 am

I vacuum seal 6oz of coffee in FoodSaver bags. And I wait a couple hours to open the bag and grind after taking it out of the freezer. Looks like what I'm doing is overkill?

rblankin

Postby rblankin » Jul 12, 2019, 4:10 pm

George Howell seems to have a lot of respect as a roaster. If you go to this link at his web site, scroll down to Issue no.2, he discusses freezing roasted coffee.
http://www.georgehowellcoffee.com/knowledge/notes-from-george/

elbertfunkleberg

Postby elbertfunkleberg » Jul 14, 2019, 10:59 am

Mrbiglzwerth wrote:I vacuum seal 6oz of coffee in FoodSaver bags. And I wait a couple hours to open the bag and grind after taking it out of the freezer. Looks like what I'm doing is overkill?

Not just overkill but actually counterproductive. In my limited experiments with vacuum sealing it actually kills the coffee beans. You'll find that most/all premium coffee vendors do not vacuum seal their beans. Just freeze in airtight containers with the minimum of air.

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RapidCoffee
Team HB

Postby RapidCoffee » replying to elbertfunkleberg » Jul 14, 2019, 1:38 pm

I used to do the Howell thang ("take a thick zip-lock bag, place the beans in it, squeeze most of the air out, and freeze it"), but switched to vacuum packing bulk orders of roasted beans this past year. I have not noticed any significant differences in flavor, and the vacuum sealing has never "killed" a coffee. If anything, my impression is that vacuum sealing is preferable for long term storage (up to two months). Speculation: the more oxygen is removed from the storage container, the longer the beans will maintain freshness.
John

elbertfunkleberg

Postby elbertfunkleberg » replying to RapidCoffee » Yesterday, 11:46 am

It's also possible that the vacuum draws out "good" gasses and oils from the beans, especially during long-term storage. Some beans/roasts might be more sensitive to this type of storage so experiences may vary from instance to instance. It's all speculation I guess until someone performs scientific trials. That someone won't be me. :)