Online espresso cost calculator

Want to talk espresso but not sure which forum? If so, this is the right one.
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keno

#1: Post by keno »

Thought this espresso calculator on the 1st Line website might be of interest. It determines the number of weeks that it will take for an espresso machine to pay for itself as a substitute for purchasing coffee out.

Here is the link: http://www.1st-line.com/estimator.htm

I know I made the same calculation when trying to get approval from my wife to purchase a $1200 espresso machine (and it certainly helped to close the deal). But while there is some validity to this method it also misses the point. There are other considerations that need to be factored in as well, including: you can make *better* espresso than what you get out; it's much more convenient; and it's more enjoyable to be your own home barista than to watch someone else make it.

On the other hand, an espresso machine will never be a substitute for all coffee consumed outside of the house. Sometimes you need a fix when at work, traveling, etc.. I wish I could take my machine with me (when I had a Silvia I did take it to my inlaws for the weekend). But at least those outings provide an opportunity to sample other espresso, even if 90% of the time it is worse than what I make at home.

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Psyd

#2: Post by Psyd »

keno wrote:Thought this espresso calculator on the 1st Line website might be of interest. It determines the number of weeks that it will take for an espresso machine to pay for itself as a substitute for purchasing coffee out.
Yay, my espresso machine will have paid for itself in 4 years, 4 months, three days, and eleven hours. Where's the calculator to find out how long it's gonna take to amortize my twin Mazzers?
Espresso Sniper
One Shot, One Kill

LMWDP #175

naked_barista

#3: Post by naked_barista »

Let's see... Hmmm... My machine has paid for itself and has been saving me money for... erm... carry the 2... factor in cost of repairs over the years... Yep! looks like 14 years, 37 weeks, and some hours. I could probably add in the cost of beans, milk, grinders, tampers, thermometers, pitchers, Bodum glasses, reading glasses, shoes, underwear, cars, houses, vacations, gifts, and charitable contributions, and still show a savings.
larry at laurelnet dot com

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Marshall

#4: Post by Marshall »

keno wrote:Thought this espresso calculator on the 1st Line website might be of interest. It determines the number of weeks that it will take for an espresso machine to pay for itself as a substitute for purchasing coffee out.

Here is the link: http://www.1st-line.com/estimator.htm

I know I made the same calculation when trying to get approval from my wife to purchase a $1200 espresso machine (and it certainly helped to close the deal). But while there is some validity to this method it also misses the point. There are other considerations that need to be factored in as well, including: you can make *better* espresso than what you get out; it's much more convenient; and it's more enjoyable to be your own home barista than to watch someone else make it.
Ah, Jim's long-needed "Wife Persuader." :D

I'll add two qualifications. 1. If you are lucky enough to live near a great espresso bar, you will usually get a better espresso out. 2. It might be more enjoyable to have your espresso in the company of your neighbors than in the solitude of your home.
Marshall
Los Angeles

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mrgnomer

#5: Post by mrgnomer »

Adding my grinder into the total it would take me about 1 use for my set up to pay for itself. Great espresso is priceless :wink: :lol:

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HB
Admin

#6: Post by HB »

Marshall wrote:It might be more enjoyable to have your espresso in the company of your neighbors than in the solitude of your home.
According to one of the home page surveys, it isn't as solitude a ritual as you might think:

Image

Unfortunately where we live in surburbia, the places worth visiting are too far away for frequent stops (Pheasant Creeek is approximately 10 miles away and Counter Culture's espresso lab is closer to 15 miles). Jim's attempt at price rationalization is an interesting marketing tactic, but the economies are weak when you factor in your time and effort. I often recommend that if you don't enjoy the process but love coffee, stick to a simpler preparation like drip of French press. Lately I've been following my own advice (three days French press / four days espresso per week) and it's quite enjoyable.
Dan Kehn

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Marshall

#7: Post by Marshall »

HB wrote:According to one of the home page surveys, it isn't as solitude a ritual as you might think:

image: /frontPage_ ... guests.png

Unfortunately where we live in surburbia, the places worth visiting are too far away for frequent stops (Pheasant Creeek is approximately 10 miles away and Counter Culture's espresso lab is closer to 15 miles). Jim's attempt at price rationalization is an interesting marketing tactic, but the economies are weak when you factor in your time and effort. I often recommend that if you don't enjoy the process but love coffee, stick to a simpler preparation like drip of French press. Lately I've been following my own advice (three days French press / four days espresso per week) and it's quite enjoyable.
I suspect your survey takers counted family members as "guests" (or they live in one of those sitcom apartments where friends walk in and out all day).

My biggest personal regret about home coffee is that it takes me about 10 days to consume a pound, because my wife's a tea person. So, it's hard to mix good drip origins and espresso blends in the same week. Espresso always seems to win out. I wind up drinking most of my drip at coffee shops, usually Peet's.
Marshall
Los Angeles

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HB
Admin

#8: Post by HB »

Marshall wrote:My biggest personal regret about home coffee is that it takes me about 10 days to consume a pound, because my wife's a tea person.
Home roasting is perfect for small batches, but I'm already so short on personal time, I order Intelligentsia's convenient half-pound bags for French press instead. Even that sometimes goes unfinished before I switch to espresso, but at least very little goes to waste.

Image
Dan Kehn

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timo888

#9: Post by timo888 »

Marshall wrote:I suspect your survey takers counted family members as "guests" (or they live in one of those sitcom apartments where friends walk in and out all day).
Or maybe the lonely lady from Hitchcock's Rear Window -- the one who prepares a candlelit dinner for an imaginary lover -- has filled out the H-B survey many times?

Regards
Timo

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cannonfodder
Team HB

#10: Post by cannonfodder »

My 5 year old son and I are the only ones that drink coffee (espresso). The wife and daughter do not. I do however pull several shots a day for myself and others in the office. One of the benefits to having a real office, my own mini shrine to the espresso gods (Isomac and Mazzer), and they thought I was going to use that table for work, Ha!

Most of my coffee is home roast. My son likes to help me so I always find time. It is also fun to watch peoples faces when they see a two group it the kitchen, then I tell them I roast my own as well. Most think I am nuts, the wife knows I am.
Dave Stephens