Italians don’t know they are drinking such bad coffee - Page 4

Want to talk espresso but not sure which forum? If so, this is the right one.
ben8jam

#31: Post by ben8jam » Jan 11, 2019, 10:38 am

CwD wrote:"Regular" coffee is a cherry-like fruit. Traditional coffee is what's distant from what coffee is. I don't care if somebody else enjoys it, but a chocolate bomb is unmistakably more distant from "regular" coffee than a fruit bomb.
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randomorbit

#32: Post by randomorbit » Jan 11, 2019, 1:30 pm

CwD wrote:"Regular" coffee is a cherry-like fruit. Traditional coffee is what's distant from what coffee is. I don't care if somebody else enjoys it, but a chocolate bomb is unmistakably more distant from "regular" coffee than a fruit bomb.
Except that, like with chocolate, we make coffee from the seed and not the fruit. If you expect roasted ground cherry pits to taste more like cherries than like chocolate, or if you're expecting peach pits to be delicious without significant processing, you might be disappointed.

Green coffee beans taste terrible. Roasting them tends to bring out the sugars, and under-roasting them under-develops the sugars. Not unlike how an under-ripened banana will taste woody and sour, under-roasted coffee will not taste good either. We all know it's easy to over-roast coffee, but it's comparatively difficult to find that fine line with lighter roasts where the sugars are fully developed, but none of them are caramelized. Not that light roasting is bad in and of itself, but the current trendiness of light roasts has led newcomers to the field to believe that it's always the best way, and actually it's not always, and again it's comparatively difficult to get it right, from roasting to brewing. So if you're going to do it, you need to do it VERY well, or you shouldn't do it at all.

Another useful analogy is bread. Also delicious, and also made from processed seeds. If you try to eat raw bread dough made only from flour, water and a bit of oil, it will be rather bland and slightly sour. Bake it, and the flavors of the grain develop, and it brings out the flavors we like. Toast it, and it gets sweeter yet. This is the maltose sugars in the grains caramelizing. Some people like bread and some people prefer toast. There are infinite opinions on how dark to make toast, but general consensus is that burnt toast is no good. I happen to enjoy the caramelized flavors, and that's what I look for in a coffee, and I never find them in beans that are too lightly roasted, so this current trend is not for me.
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