How’s This Idea For Fresh Coffee Bean Storage?

Want to talk espresso but not sure which forum? If so, this is the right one.
Rustic39

#1: Post by Rustic39 »

I was thinking the other day how I might improve my home roasted coffee storage by reducing the exposure to O2. Currently I'm putting beans into mason jars, which does fine in the short term since I'm going through it so quickly.

But what if I roast some ahead, and don't want to use it up quickly? I don't want to cycle it in and out of the freezer. If I store it in the mason jar, using some here and there, over time the headspace increases with each withdrawal, introducing more O2.

I'm thinking of trying out wine bottles for my storage container, closing bottle with vacuum stoppers. That would allow me to take out any amount of coffee, close bottle, and evacuate all the O2. I know that the young roast will off-gas CO2 for a little while, but would that still be a problem 5-20 days after roasting? Has anyone reading this tried it out?

I suppose when enough CO2 is released, the vacuum simply is filled, and eventually the stopper is pushed loose.

Not really interested very much in those single serving glass/plastic vials being sold for storage.

User avatar
yakster
Supporter ♡

#2: Post by yakster »

They make vacuum seal attachments for canning jars. The wide mouth size seems to seal better than the regular size for me. I only vac seal green (unroasted) coffee since I'm unsure that storing roasted coffee under vacuum helps or hurts the coffee but I know that there's others that do vac seal their roasted coffee either in bags or canning jars.

I like canning jars since I can run them through the dishwasher to clean them up easily after each use.
-Chris

LMWDP # 272

Jeff

#3: Post by Jeff »

James Hoffman recently did a review of long-term storage of roasted beans. My take-away was that of the commercial canisters he tested, the significant result was somewhat better espresso from those that reduced the pressure. None of the results were "overwhelming", in my opinion, to change my "this week's beans" storage in a container I find easy to use. Dark, cool, and as little oxygen as possible seem to be sound advice. I don't think that relying on CO2 to displace the O2 is very effective. I bag and vacuum pack mine with good results, usually for weeks, occasionally for months.

The approach with canning jars seems very reasonable if you don't have a high-end vacuum packer already. A simple hand pump is likely sufficient. I may try it with my chamber sealer as coffee beans will poke through a single bag.

Qrumcof
Supporter

#4: Post by Qrumcof » replying to Jeff »

I just bought a chamber vacuum sealer. Avid Armor Chamber Vacuum Sealer Model USV32 $600 on amazon. I pull two shots a day, but end up buying several pounds at a time; if it keeps my beans fresh it will pay for itself in a year or three.

My big question is if after you vacuum seal the bag, does the offgassing degrade the coffee at all? Since people of had good results vacuum sealing and freezing this implies that the offgassing does not harm the beans. I just bought 7 pounds from this place: https://bgcoffee.net/collections/all ..

I love this chamber vacuum sealer.. Looks like I can seal six of the 16 ounce mason jars at the same time, and maybe nine At a time.. Bought 7.2 mil thick foil bags (24 cents each), And the sealer seals them fine (but I had to adjust the seal time).

My plan is to vacuum pack the bags and store them in the freezer
And use the mason jars for the coffee I am currently using (at room temperature). Then I'll have the option to vacuum those if I choose. My plan is to vacuum pack the bags and store them in the freezer.. And use the mason jar's for the coffee I am currently using (at room temperature). Then I'll have the option to vacuum those if I choose.

jpender

#5: Post by jpender »

Rustic39 wrote:I don't want to cycle it in and out of the freezer.
Why not? Temperature has a greater effect on aging than oxygen exposure.

Rustic39 wrote:I'm thinking of trying out wine bottles for my storage container, closing bottle with vacuum stoppers. That would allow me to take out any amount of coffee, close bottle, and evacuate all the O2.
If you're talking about those wine bottle vacuum pumps, like Vacu Vin, you won't even come close to removing all the O2.

Wine bottles seem awkward to me but it won't hurt to use them. Just realize that even after pumping, depending on how full the bottle is, there will sometimes be more O2 than a simple ziplock bag.

Qrumcof
Supporter

#6: Post by Qrumcof »

Qrumcof wrote:I love this chamber vacuum sealer.. Looks like I can seal six of the 16 ounce mason jars at the same time, and maybe nine At a time.. Bought 7.2 mil thick foil bags (24 cents each), And the sealer seals them fine (but I had to adjust the seal time).
Maybe I spoke too soon. I was searching HB and found a discussion that chamber vacuum sealer's ruin the coffee taste (because of the strong vacuum of chamber sealers). Several people were saying there's a system that flushes CO2 gas that is much better. Maybe I'll play it safe (I hope) and set the vacuum sealer on low, then when the coffee offgassing puffs up the bag I'll be left with a very low oxygen percentage.

Tzuyu

#7: Post by Tzuyu »

Qrumcof wrote: Maybe I spoke too soon. I was searching HB and found a discussion that chamber vacuum sealer's ruin the coffee taste (because of the strong vacuum of chamber sealers). Several people were saying there's a system that flushes CO2 gas that is much better. Maybe I'll play it safe (I hope) and set the vacuum sealer on low, then when the coffee offgassing puffs up the bag I'll be left with a very low oxygen percentage.
What beans did you buy that was 7 Lbs Worth?, I live 5 miles from that location.

Qrumcof
Supporter

#8: Post by Qrumcof » replying to Tzuyu »

I wanted to try all four of the Italian roasts (Corresponding to regions in Italy). But then I bought a few more..

Tanzania Peaberry -
Misty Valley (Ethiopian Yirgacheffe) -
Vernazza Blend -
Espresso Estate -
Espresso Primavera -
Espresso Inverno -
Espresso Autunno -

jpender

#9: Post by jpender »

Qrumcof wrote:Maybe I spoke too soon. I was searching HB and found a discussion that chamber vacuum sealer's ruin the coffee taste (because of the strong vacuum of chamber sealers). Several people were saying there's a system that flushes CO2 gas that is much better.
There are hypotheses without supporting data. And there are conflicting anecdotal reports. If you're thinking about buying an expensive chamber sealer you might pause to consider negative reviews. But if you already have one just try it. Split bags and vacuum one half and compare. It's your taste that matters.

Qrumcof wrote:Maybe I'll play it safe (I hope) and set the vacuum sealer on low, then when the coffee offgassing puffs up the bag I'll be left with a very low oxygen percentage.
Adding CO2 won't change the total amount of O2 or the partial pressure.

bettysnephew

#10: Post by bettysnephew »

Regarding chamber sealer/freezing and taste of roasted beans...

I used to volunteer for Red Cross during major disaster deployments. The normal deployment is 3 weeks. I had gone out several times some years back and found no discernible taste difference even with the added 3 weeks of storage added to the normal length of storage time. Then hurricane Harvey and Irma showed up and I did back to back deployments, six weeks total. I fully expected to find my coffee beans somewhat aged in taste. To my delight I noticed little if any degradation. It may have been because I was so happy to get back to good espresso or possibly that my taste buds are not sommelier quality but whatever the case it works well for me.

FWIW, I vacuum seal 5 lb. in quart jars and they are stored in a conventional bottom mount freezer/refrigerator at 0˚F.
Suffering from EAS (Espresso Acquisition Syndrome)
LMWDP #586