How hot should espresso be drunk? - Page 2

Want to talk espresso but not sure which forum? If so, this is the right one.
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Marshall

#11: Post by Marshall »

gilrain wrote:Aside from having some shots with my brother, several years ago, my home machine will be my sole introduction to fine espresso.
This is waaay too early to get anal about espresso issues. Your machine hasn't even arrived! There are lots of rituals to learn and then perfect before you can pour a good shot on a regular basis. THEN you can worry about your favorite serving temperature. Actually there is nothing to worry about at all. You think it's too hot? Wait a minute or two, and it will be cooler (and taste different).
Marshall
Los Angeles

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gilrain (original poster)

#12: Post by gilrain (original poster) »

Is it ever too early to get obsessive about espresso? :wink:

I mean, okay, maybe so... it's just how I am with a new interest. And once I get my stuff, and can actually begin trying to apply all this information, my mental intensity will decrease to sane levels. It's just the waiting that gets to me.

Joel_B

#13: Post by Joel_B »

Hehe, pretty funny. I can definitely appreciate your enthusiasm, if not a little envious.

I'm with marshall on this one. It's a little like not knowing how to ride a bike, ordering a mt bike, and wondering what would be the optimum dampening of the shocks :) If you're like a lot of us here, you'll spend several days and several pounds of coffee to get something worth drinking in the first place. Ultimately you'll determine how hot you want your espresso to be drunk.
cannonfodder wrote:For the record, I like Oban 14 year single malt most of the time...
Probably one of my favorite scotches.

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gilrain (original poster)

#14: Post by gilrain (original poster) »

That sounds exactly like what I would doing, if the Expobar was actually a new Trek. :)

I actually did wind up testing my sipping abilities, yesterday, while drinking a cup of pu-erh tea. I can't sip enjoyably until the temperature drops to 140 F. You all have persuaded me to not be too concerned about that, though.

As far as scotch goes, I enjoy a wide variety of 'em. My desert island scotch, though, would probably be Lagavulin. Ardbeg is good, though, and not so overpriced. And gosh, on a desert island you might want less of the peat-and-seawater taste, so maybe Highland Park...

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Psyd

#15: Post by Psyd »

cafeIKE wrote: Laphroig 15 yr is nothing like a Caol Ila. They are made next door to one another, yet vastly different.
Would you 'train' yourself to drink JD & Coke when The Glenlivet 18 and a splash of Highland Spring was on offer?
Note to self: > next time in CA, make time to hang in Woodland Hills for at least and afternoon <

I'm partial to the Macallan 18, but here it tastes more sugary and a bit less scotch-like. Cadenhead's Campbeltown Malt is probably my all-time fave, but I have no idea where to get it aside from the Royal Mile in Edinburgh... Kind of a trek even for good scotch...
I'm fond of espresso in really good, sweet rum, but I'm still afraid to combine scotch and espresso. I guess I may have something lying around that wouldn't be sacreligious to experiment with!
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cafeIKE
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#16: Post by cafeIKE »

Joel_B wrote:Oban... Probably one of my favorite scotches.
Cutty Sark is 'scotch', Oban is malt whisky, albeit a pretty tame one. It's distilled in a tourist town for tourists. It and Cragganmore are my two least favorites of the "Classic Malts." Glenkinchie is a nice lowland and much better than Oban if you like to add a drop of water. Dalwhinnie is the most variable of the Classic's as it's the highest distillery in Scotland and the weather can be more extreme. When it's great, it's truly great. Lagavulin and Talisker are my two faves in the Classic's.

Recommendation for Oban drinkers : Scapa.
No ice. As they say in Glasgy, "Why d' y' wanna poot th' fire oot, laddie?"

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eastpresso

#17: Post by eastpresso »

cafeIKE wrote:What our tongue senses changes with temperature. That's why there is so much sugar in ice cream and neat Jack Daniel's is so unpalatable. Using the kettle and thermometer is a waste of time because as it is just a physical sensation.

Some people pre-heat their cups with boiling water to keep the espresso scalding, while other prefer just warmed.

Pull and drink espresso at the temperature you find most enjoyable.
I am with Ian on this one. Scalding you tongue because you are trying to drink the espresso at a 'recommended' temperature (a temperature someone determined based on their personal preference) will surely dampen your enthusiasm :mrgreen:

Supposing for a minute there was ONE ideal temperature for drinking espresso - how would you measure it, determine it's the correct temperature AND drink it while it is still at the same exact temperature (short of sticking a Fluke in there and watching the display while you drink it)?

There are other factors that will most likely influence the taste of your espresso more than a subjective drinking temperature - just wait :wink:

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Psyd

#18: Post by Psyd »

cafeIKE wrote: No ice. As they say in Glasgy, "Why d' y' wanna poot th' fire oot, laddie?"
The Old Gaffer I drank with in Glasgow agreed with me. Cask strength was not intended to be drunk without water. So did the distiller I met in Edinburgh. 'We don't mind hauling whisky around, but it seems a bit unthrifty to drag water over hill and dale, when there'll just be more water there 'nyway.'
I'll take my mine with water and ice, so it's at the strength that the distiller intended, and the temperature that I remember Glasgow to be! ; >
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Joel_B

#19: Post by Joel_B »

cafeIKE wrote:Cutty Sark is 'scotch', Oban is malt whisky, albeit a pretty tame one. It's distilled in a tourist town for tourists. It and Cragganmore are my two least favorites of the "Classic Malts." Glenkinchie is a nice lowland and much better than Oban if you like to add a drop of water. Dalwhinnie is the most variable of the Classic's as it's the highest distillery in Scotland and the weather can be more extreme. When it's great, it's truly great. Lagavulin and Talisker are my two faves in the Classic's.

Recommendation for Oban drinkers : Scapa.
No ice. As they say in Glasgy, "Why d' y' wanna poot th' fire oot, laddie?"
I stand corrected :oops: I haven't been into single malt whiskeys in a while, but oban was always near the top for me. Looks like I've got a few recommendations here to get me back into it, thanks!

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WilsonHines

#20: Post by WilsonHines »

If I could fit my head, I would let it drop straight into my mouth from the portafilter! :lol: :shock:

Seriously, I drink my espresso immediately after I stop the pump.