Help Me Build My Coffee Bar

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blutch

#1: Post by blutch »

I have a blank 6ft wall in my kitchen I want to turn into my coffee bar. I want room for pour over stuff (one kettle), two grinders, two scales, E61 (probably Crem ONE Infuser) built in pitcher rinser, built in knock box. Below the bar I want room for a coffee bar plumb setup. Water bottle feeding the machine and drainage. Eventually I might plumb it all into the house lines because a bathroom is on the other side of the wall, but water is really hard, so I will need a good filtering system, so that won't happen right away.

I want it to be at least 24" tall, (maybe taller) 18-20" deep. A top I can drill and cut into for the build ins. I will install shelves on the wall over everything for various storage, but I'd like some shelves underneath or drawers but enough open space for the water bottles and drainage. I would like cabinet doors in front to cover everything, but would settle for curtains to cover all the mess underneath.

I can rough build stuff for outside, but don't have any fine woodworking skills or tools to build cabinets for indoors, so i need to either buy something pre-made or get someone to build it.

I'm open to all ideas and advice on this. Thanks in advance!!

B

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Randy G.

#2: Post by Randy G. »

Ready-made cabinets can be had from Lowe's, Home Depot, and check Ikea. Have your water tested to decide what treatment would be effective. I just finished settingting up a bar so check my blog"s Chapter 166 on my website for ideas.
www.EspressoMyEspresso.com
*20th Anniversary 2000-2020*

PeetsFan
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#3: Post by PeetsFan »

blutch wrote:I have a blank 6ft wall in my kitchen I want to turn into my coffee bar.
I did this recently. I put this in my breakfast nook, next to my kitchen. Obviously, you can spend a lot more, but this is where I'm starting and I'm very happy with the results so far. It doesn't quite have a custom kitchen look but it's a lot better than a table. Everyone who sees it loves it.

I added a picture with the countertop before I applied the Varathane; it's still wrapped and says, "Butcherblock Countertop" upside down. It doesn't look like that anymore.

Please let me know if you have any questions. This is 100% DIY.

I bought a 36" wide kitchen cabinet from Lowe's. It was open box. $100.
I bought a 42" wide butcher block countertop from Lowe's. It was about $120.
I bought a water filter/softener setup from Chris Coffee. It was $100.
I bought urethane and some very fine sandpaper for the butcher block. This was very easy but it took a weekend because you take the countertop outside, sand lightly, apply the urethane with a brush, and wait four hours to dry. Repeat. Repeat again. Flip over. Repeat/Repeat/Repeat. But each coat and sanding took less than ten minutes. The result is a waterproof wood surface that you can wipe spills off of right away. Apparently, it's very bad if you only coat one side. You have to coat and seal the whole thing.
Getting the water IN was a lot easier than getting the water OUT. So far, I'm only draining into a bucket. I'm probably going to buy a pump to get the water out.
I bought a 2-pack of water sensors for my Ring alarm. If the fittings leak here, or under my kitchen sink, I'll get an alert right away. That's the white disc you see in the water filter picture.
I haven't installed the sink yet. I found a few really nice rinser/drainers I like. I'm waiting to be 100% done with my plumbing.
Electrical is a challenge if you want an E61 and also a fridge for the milk. You need those two items on separate circuits. That little gotcha can blow your budget (or DIY labor hours) up fast.



blutch (original poster)

#4: Post by blutch (original poster) »

Peetsfan - This is VERY helpful to me. I looked at the same butcher block today and I'm glad to know how to finish it. Please let me know what weight of sandpaper to use.. did you use one of those foam blocks? Also the brand of shellac you used would be helpful. Is there anyway you could take a pic of it from the front with he finished top?

I'm looking at a 60" cabinet with a 70" countertop, so I have to buy a 72" top and cut it. I'd like to see how it looks all finished.

Thank you!

B

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Randy G.

#5: Post by Randy G. »

PeetsFan wrote:I did this recently. I put this in my breakfast nook, next to my kitchen. Obviously, you can spend a lot more, but this is where I'm starting and I'm very happy with the results so far. It doesn't quite have a custom kitchen look but it's a lot better than a table. Everyone who sees it loves it.
The Arc'd JG tubing leading into the softener cartridge as well as the loop between the cartridges should have 90 degree elbows in them and straight runs of tubing. The lateral force that the curve puts on the fittings will eventually lead to a leak. Don't ask me how I know, but it took three days for the carpet and padding to dry out (in the old house) even with a box under the carpet and a fan running 24/7.

Like this:

The one curved tube is a low pressure, low volume silicone hose.
www.EspressoMyEspresso.com
*20th Anniversary 2000-2020*

PeetsFan
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#6: Post by PeetsFan »

blutch wrote:Peetsfan - This is VERY helpful to me. I looked at the same butcher block today and I'm glad to know how to finish it. Please let me know what weight of sandpaper to use.. did you use one of those foam blocks? Also the brand of shellac you used would be helpful. Is there anyway you could take a pic of it from the front with he finished top?

I'm looking at a 60" cabinet with a 70" countertop, so I have to buy a 72" top and cut it. I'd like to see how it looks all finished.

Thank you!

B
What I used was 140 or 150 grit. I tried some 220 on the last coat, but I'm not sure if I needed to.

The butcher block is already sanded, so you just use very light strokes in the direction of the grain. I just wrapped the sandpaper around a sanding sponge; you don't need to do anything fancy. I don't recommend a power sander at all. Once you put a coat on and it dries, you're sanding VERY lightly. It's obviously very easy to sand through the coat you just applied. It's more like lightly polishing than sanding.

The thing about Varathane/urethane is that it outgases as it dries. That's why you should do this outside if possible and you need four hours for fast-drying product. If you put a second coat on too soon, bubbles from the underlying coat will occur. No matter what, some bubbling will occur, especially around edges. Your light sanding will take care of this.

The short edge is cross-cut and I'm not sure if you can sand it as finely; I didn't try too hard, but maybe you'll need 60 or 80 where you cut it.

PeetsFan
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#7: Post by PeetsFan »

Randy G. wrote:The Arc'd JG tubing leading into the softener cartridge as well as the loop between the cartridges should have 90 degree elbows in them and straight runs of tubing. The lateral force that the curve puts on the fittings will eventually lead to a leak.
Thanks Randy!
I've been meaning to take care of some of that, now my motivation is stronger!

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blutch (original poster)

#8: Post by blutch (original poster) »

Beautiful. Thanks for the details! I thought of another question. How is the top connected? Just silicone bead or did you screw it in somehow from the bottom? Thanks again.

PeetsFan
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#9: Post by PeetsFan » replying to blutch »

First, the cabinet is bolted to wall studs.

Right now, I haven't yet bolted the butcher block in because I intend to add a sink, so I might remove it to cut the sink opening outside (sawdust issue indoors).

Once that's done, the cabinet has plastic fittings which I can screw through to attach the countertop. I've been told to affix the countertop loosely, to allow for the countertop's expansion/contraction. But you might want to check someone else on that.

I hope by now you realize I'm not a professional kitchen installer, but this is a $300-ish job, not a $3,000 job. And you can spend WAY more for the cabinet and countertop. I absolutely love the result, though.

SandraF

#10: Post by SandraF »

I Highly Recommend getting something a little bigger than you think you'll require. My solution was an IKEA Utility cart I already had ($99). The surface measurements are: about 35" tall, 33" wide and 21" deep. I painted the plywood top with several coats of Annie Sloan chalk paint, then sealed well with wax. It works 'ok', but hot pitchers leave ring marks around the top. I may end up getting a butcher block like the previous poster and attach it to my cart.

https://www.ikea.com/us/en/p/bror-utili ... -60333850/

Something open like this won't suit your needs, however, I thought given the dimensions of the work surface I would have more than enough room for things. Well, what I wouldn't do for more space... May I suggest laying out all of your equipment in the position you decide (ahead of time), then measure. I'm 5'6" tall and having the cart just almost at counter height works great for me. Keep body ergonomics in mind while deciding surface area.

I like the idea of getting a closed cabinet, then a butcher block or similar for the top.