Freezing coffee beans for espresso - Page 3

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RapidCoffee
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#21: Post by RapidCoffee »

JohnB. wrote:Are you saying you've had bad luck freezing vegetables?
OT but yes, fresh fruits/veggies can undergo profound deleterious changes in texture and flavor when frozen/thawed. Ditto for fish. To be fair, I haven't pursued this to any great extent (unlike freezing coffee :wink:).
John

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JohnB.
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#22: Post by JohnB. » replying to RapidCoffee »

We freeze a large portion of the vegetables we grow in our garden each year & 90% of our blueberries. I guess it depends on which vegetables you try to freeze but we've had excellent luck freezing yellow corn, black eyed peas, tomatillos, lima beans, fresh jalapenos, roasted peppers & more. Tomatoes get made into sauce which then gets frozen.
As far as the fish goes the vast majority of the "fresh fish" you buy at the markets was previously frozen & thawed before putting it in the display case.
LMWDP 267

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LBIespresso
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#23: Post by LBIespresso »

JohnB. wrote: As far as the fish goes the vast majority of the "fresh fish" you buy at the markets was previously frozen & thawed before putting it in the display case.
https://www.nytimes.com/2004/04/08/nyre ... reeze.html

I had to search for the article but I remember being shocked when I read that, "Most would be even more surprised to learn that if the sushi has not been frozen, it is illegal to serve it in the United States."
LMWDP #580

jpender

#24: Post by jpender »

Auctor wrote:Where I think there's disagreement is whether the freeze/thaw/refreeze cycle has any impact on coffee, especially when new air is introduced during the thaw phase.

If you expose cold enough beans to open air moisture will condense on the beans. This is very easy to demonstrate for yourself. What is harder to demonstrate is what effect it has on the coffee.

While not quite what you're talking about, like others I pull coffee out of the freezer daily, open the container, measure a dose, and the return the container to the freezer. I wondered how this repeated exposure affected the coffee. So I tested it. I measured the moisture content of the beans I pulled out over the course of two weeks. I performed multiple blind tastings with those beans versus beans from the same batch that had been sealed in the freezer as individual doses. The result? Moisture accumulation was negligible. And I could not taste any difference between the two storage methods.

jpender

#25: Post by jpender »

The freeze/thaw/refreeze question has been debated before. People assume that it's a problem based mainly on analogy with foods. It certainly is not true in general, even for food. Is it true for coffee? I've only seen one person test this. He concluded that it had a deleterious effect.

Preserving coffee freshness for use on weekends

You could test it yourself with a simple experiment: Two sealed containers of beans from the same batch in the freezer. Take one container out and let it come to room temperature. Then return it to the freezer. Then cup both of the coffees. You can fairly easily blind yourself to which beans are which without any assistance.

My guess is you won't be able to detect a significant difference. To really know you'll likely have to repeat the experiment many times. It might depend on the specific coffee as well.

JackHK

#26: Post by JackHK »

First try with Centrifuge tubes "Can withstand temperature from -80° to 121°C"

This 50ml tubes fit about 20 grams of beans.

I do grind it frozen direct from the freezer :mrgreen:


LindoPhotography

#27: Post by LindoPhotography »

In case no one has solved this yet, I believe I had the same issue at first and I know what causes this problem (and how to avoid it).
When you freeze lets say a bag or jar of coffee, and you take it right out of the freezer and use it right away, I believe the condensation forms and the moisture causes the beans to age or stale at an accelerated rate, I remember it was good for the first day or two then went downhill fast!

BUT since I started leaving the coffee out of the freezer to come up to room temperature first BEFORE breaking the seal, the coffee now seems to continue aging at the normal rate.
Auctor wrote:+1
I think thawing changes the bean, and possibly ages it faster (similar to veggies). Also, definitely never freeze, thaw, and refreeze.

chanty 77

#28: Post by chanty 77 »

I just started ordering for the sake of saving on shipping three 12oz. bags at one time. The first & second bag, no issues in any way, third bag no flavor issues, just the fast running no matter what grind/grams probably due to it being about 24 days post roast when I open that bag. That said, I put the 3rd bag (sealed, 10 day post roast) in the freezer. I've searched & read that condensation can build up on the beans once you take the bag/container out of the freezer, so it should be unsealed to avoid condensation. Now I just read what someone posted back in March 2022 below:
'BUT since I started leaving the coffee out of the freezer to come up to room temperature first BEFORE breaking the seal, the coffee now seems to continue aging at the normal rate'.

I don't plan on refreezing the beans once I thaw out. It is a 12 oz. bag that I will go through within 7-9 days. Do I unseal bag right away or wait til room temp to avoid condensation? Thanks.

prust
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#29: Post by prust »

Have been freezing for years in plastic coffee storage bags with valves. I divide a roast into several bags, each with enough to last for a week and freeze immediately off roast. If I want to coffee to degas for 3 days before use, I take it out of the freezer 3 days before I will need it. It never goes back into the freezer and this process has worked well. I have also frozen bags of coffee received from commercial roasters. They typically arrive about 3-4 days post roast. I usually purchase several bags, keep one for immediate use and freeze the remaining. I then use a bag from the freezer without waiting since it has already had 3-4 days to degas during the shipping process.

chanty 77

#30: Post by chanty 77 » replying to prust »

Since I put it in the freezer at already 10 days post roast, can I use it as soon as the beans thaw? Also, should I open the sealed bag right away before thawing so I don't get condensation? Thanx!