Freeze Distilled Milk

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Capuchin Monk

#1: Post by Capuchin Monk »

Anyone tried freeze distilled milk?
When I came back to US from my trip to Italy, I noticed that milk here in the states taste more like half water and half milk in comparison and cappuccino I made just didn't taste anything close to the ones I've had in Italy. So I'm wondering, has anyone tried this freeze distilled milk?

OldmatefromOZ

#2: Post by OldmatefromOZ »

I did it a couple of times with full fat which i think is around 3.5% here.

It definitely kicks up the richness / decadence factor in a flat white. This was enough to make me interested in a 2nd batch, enough to make 2L batch of yoghurt and it was the best ive ever made / eaten, could hang upside down on spoon and was naturally sweet after 12hr ferment.

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JohnB.
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#3: Post by JohnB. »

Just buy Half & Half and save some time.
LMWDP 267

jpender

#4: Post by jpender »

Wouldn't Mr. Put have thought of that first?

They're not the same thing. Half & half is higher in fat but has essentially the same concentration of sugars/proteins as whole milk.

Capuchin Monk (original poster)

#5: Post by Capuchin Monk (original poster) »

JohnB. wrote:Just buy Half & Half and save some time.
I've experimented with h & h, heavy cream, mixed with milk...etc. It just didn't come close to the milk in Italy (or Europe?). :(
This distillation may be a new experiment for me to try. :idea:

CoolHandLukey

#6: Post by CoolHandLukey »

Freeze Concentration - Complete yumm for switch-hitting the same batch of brewed beer: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/a ... 732030795X
Death is not evil let alone the worst of evils. 'Live free or die'

chipman

#7: Post by chipman »

So you end up with 1 1/2 cups of milk from a full half gallon container? Seems a little waste of money if you ask me, which you didn't.

jpender

#8: Post by jpender »

Capuchin Monk wrote:I've experimented with h & h, heavy cream, mixed with milk...etc. It just didn't come close to the milk in Italy (or Europe?). :(
This distillation may be a new experiment for me to try. :idea:
Whatever it is about European or Italian milk that makes it taste better it isn't because it's more concentrated.

Unless... were you drinking donkey milk in Italy? That milk is higher in sugar.

Nunas
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#9: Post by Nunas »

jpender wrote:Whatever it is about European or Italian milk that makes it taste better it isn't because it's more concentrated. Unless... were you drinking donkey milk in Italy? That milk is higher in sugar.
I agree. It more likely has to do with the breeds of cows in the herd. Have a look here https://extension.psu.edu/milk-componen ... dairy-herd Another difference is genetic variation. I found this The difference between American cows and European cows has to do with amino acid 67 - in European cows, it's a proline. Because of a genetic mutation in American cows, amino acid 67 is a histidine. Finally, there are quite likely major differences in how European cows are fed and treated with antibiotics, as the health and husbandry regulations are quite different in the EU.

jpender

#10: Post by jpender »

Maybe the feed as well?

I got some pizza at a local place the other day and was talking to the proprietor. I noticed they had bags of Caputo flour stacked up. It's the same brand I ended up with for home pizza making after experimenting with several flours. I asked him about it and he said that he'd tried a number of domestic double zero ground flours and none of them were as good as the (more expensive) flour from Italy. Why is that? Well, for whatever the reason, they make better flour there.